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learning Linux


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#1
Shady

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is there a good place online (class--not books) to learn linux? the more and more i use it, i see how much more you can do w/it compared to Windows. i've checked both local community colleges and they do not offer anything for Linux. even checked Illinois State University, nothing. any help would be appreciated. thank you.
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#2
devper94

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Hi,

There are not many Linux courses online, but you can check out Linux+. I don't believe it is an online course though.

The best way to learn Linux, in my opinion, is to install a Linux distro (I recommend Debian/Ubuntu/Mint, Arch, Gentoo or Linux From Scratch) and discover for yourself.
Note that Gentoo and Linux From Scratch are not very beginner-friendly. Arch is simpler, but still requires a lot of setup to get a working desktop. You can pick one based on how confident you are with Linux. Also, you should install it on a VM like VirtualBox; that way you will be able to turn back your Linux to a working state at any time.
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#3
ridius

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While I'm not aware of any online courses, I personally learned a ton about Linux just doing a Gentoo install (and meticulously following the handbook). Consider at least looking at the handbook for Gentoo at http://www.gentoo.org.

As was mentioned, it's not the easiest system to use but you will learn a lot. I know I sure did.
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#4
Macboatmaster

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Shady


I would echo what has been said.
The ideal situation I found with Ubuntu and I am by no means an expert was to install it, on its own, on a spare computer I had.
Then if you get it seriously wrong you are not risking disaster, as you MAY be if you had it as dual boot on your main computer.

I found the terminal commands the most challenging as of course it is really so much different to the windows cmd prompt.

In respect ONLY of Ubuntu
http://shop.canonica...products_id=807
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#5
calvert

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this is good for learners, nice and easy to use

http://linuxsurvival.com/
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#6
Aristazi

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Thanks calvert! The modules are really creative and helpful. I'm just through Module 1 so far, it's kinda fun! :)
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#7
NKGuy

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If anyone is reading this the best way to learn about Linux is first pick a derivative such as Ubuntu, Fedore, openSUSE, Debian or etc. Then go to that site's support forum usually you will find the people there extremely helpful to new members. Unless you go to Debians. Linux is one of those things that is better learned hands on. With Ubuntu you have the option to install it as any program would install on windows.
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#8
XeonFlare

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I had spent a lot of time playing around with distros like Ubuntu and even spent some time with Opensuse. Personally, I found that I started to learn a lot when I was working with Linux for a purpose, for example working with a distro like Backtrack or trying to setup something like Asterisk. The process of working with tools, most of which are completely operate from the terminal, helped me break the dependency of GUI that I had acquired in Windows; not to say Windows doesn't have none GUI elements.
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#9
Wald0

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I learned linux from installing Ubuntu in a virtual machine like virtual box and started to play around with some of the basic commands in the shell to get a hand on the system. After that I went to nixcraft they went more in depth with certain topics in the linux atmosphere.
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#10
ash004

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Its all about self learning Install mint 14 and go search google how to play with it install stuff, Modify the kernel and u can do a lot of stuff
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#11
lampdeveloper

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check this out

http://localdomain.me
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#12
anonionous

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is there a good place online (class--not books) to learn linux? the more and more i use it, i see how much more you can do w/it compared to Windows. i've checked both local community colleges and they do not offer anything for Linux. even checked Illinois State University, nothing. any help would be appreciated. thank you.


I think a lot of the learning that you're talking about would depend upon how deep you want to go into Linux.

If what you want to do is to install a distro to use alongside of or in place of windows and all you're worried about doing is surfing the net you don't have that much to learn.

If what you want to do is get into the command line and really learn Linux then you need to learn a lot more.

Let's say for the sake of argument that all you want is an operating system that will work and let you surf the net.

IF your system meets the system requirements, which you can find out by going to a search engine and typing in the name of the distro you are considering for ex. Linux Mint 14 system requirements.

Once you have determined what distro you would like to use, that you have the correct system requirements, you then need to download the .iso file for the live cd/dvd.

From the downloaded ISO file you need to burn it as an image.

Leave the burned disk in the drive and restart the computer.

You might want to check your BIOS settings at this point to make sure you can BOOT off a CD/DVD before you boot off your HDD.

After checking out the distro from the live cd/dvd you can choose to install it.

I am giving directions for the Linux Mint distro.

If you want to install more software you should go to your package handler to find the programs you want to install.

If you want to surf the net click on the browser icon.

There now you have learned the basics of Linux.

Hope this helps.

dandielionous
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#13
6stringer

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Couldn't get any of the modules to load on my machine.
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#14
flyboy1565

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if you have the money i remmond CBT Nuggets, the video teach the basics. I only use them because the company is paying for them, otherwise I'd try to go free as well.

Either way best thing with linux is, you can run it pretty much any where. Meaning you can make one to mess up.
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#15
geekofgeeks

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You can check this Unix Questions Answers. This site contain a good variety of Linux Questions
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