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RAID 0 drive needs replacing


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#1
Jackpine

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Hi there. My computer has two 250GB Western Digital SATA 2 hard drives configured as RAID 0 that I use strictly for data storage. My operating system (Windows XP) and all other programs are on a separate WD hard drive.

I sometimes hear a clicking sound when I restart the computer from a total shutdown. The clicking sound is recent over the last week or so. My computer is about 6 years old. I used a WD diagnostic tool which showed that one of the RAID drives is failing. My questions concern the method of replacing the defective drive.

When I originally configured the drives, I went into Start,..., Administrative Tools, Disk Managment, and followed the instructions to initialize, format and assign a drive letter. (Numerous other steps were completed previously such as installing the RAID driver and using the Intel Matrix Storage Manager Utiltiy to set up RAID 0.)

What would the process be if I swapped the defective drive with a new one? Is it simply a case of swapping and rebooting the computer, or is it necessary to go through the same configuration process? (By the way, everything on the RAID drives has been backed up, so I can erase everything if need be before replacing the defective drive.)

Basically, what I am looking for is: after the new drive is installed, what are the steps to get this machine operational again?

Thank you.

Edited by Jackpine, 04 January 2012 - 01:08 PM.

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#2
Neil Jones

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Copy everything off the RAID to a new drive while you still can, because when drive in question fails, it will take the entire data with it.

In a RAID 0 setup, there is no redunancy. Therefore if a drive fails, the array falls down. In that scenario you would need to replace the drive and rebuild the array. In RAID 0 you cannot simply replace the faulty drive and carry on.

In your case, replace the faulty drive and then rebuild the array as you did before, because the machine should still boot off the drive XP is installed on now.

Bear in mind if both drives that were in your RAID 0are of the same age the still working drive is almost certainly going to fail soon so you may want to consider replacing it as well. Bear in mind if you put two drives of different sizes into a RAID 0, you'll only get a size of the smallest drive.
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#3
Jackpine

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Thank you for the feedback.

Both RAID drives are exactly the same age, so I will follow your advice and replace them both at the same time, with the same size drives.

As I mentioned, I have already backed up all the data, so that is not an issue.

Just so that I am clear, after replacing both drives, the steps to rebuild the RAID 0 array is done via Disk Management, correct?
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#4
Neil Jones

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Normally an option in the RAID BIOS which appears when the machine fires up. Most commonly press F10 or CTRL+S or whatever to get into it. You can format the RAID from Disk Management.
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