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25 year old case + new parts = HELP!


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#16
Jorunn

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I ran to another little problem with my plywood front, the case has a bump for a speaker.

[attachment=56076:Speaker bump.jpg]

I am appling tongue depresser as shims to level out the front.

[attachment=56077:tongue depresser.jpg]

It seems to have worked well.

[attachment=56078:font.jpg]

Next, I need to connect the lights to the front. The download MoBo manual with the clearer picture, show how to connect them. Going thru my salvage I found a plastic panel with 3 colored lights. useing my hair dryer to war up the ot melt glue, them came out very easy.

The old double USB jack I found needs a small plate made. I went to the hardwar store and pick up a few free samples of flomica. I figure I can do it with that.

Later
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#17
Troy

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Looks great, keep the updates coming, loving the pictures. Definitely a one-of-a-kind case :)
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#18
Jorunn

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Looks great, keep the updates coming, loving the pictures. Definitely a one-of-a-kind case :)



Sometimes a kind comment can encourage,:wub: thanks.

Here is the old USB jack I am using, do you think it is kind da ugly too?

[attachment=56141:old USB.jpg]

So, I got a few samples of Formica from the hardware store, and went to work.

[attachment=56142:formica.jpg]

Oh, it chipped a little, and not, like perfect perfect, But wait till you see it fitted. My real job is measureing stuff, so I used my caliper to measure and mark the layout, then drilled a hole. To make that hole rectangle I just used a box cutter, and scrapped it out.

Here it is, I think it will be fine. I will make final adjustment befor I attach it.

[attachment=56143:face.jpg]

Later
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#19
Troy

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If it was ugly without the cover, you sure fixed that up.
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#20
Digerati

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You know, if you put a large intake fan down at the the bottom of that front panel, then not only will you have a nice looking, custom front panel, but you will have an intelligent design custom front panel!

A front intake fan with a removable, washable air filter would be smarter yet! I recommend the intake be as big as you can fit, to supoort at least a 120mm case fan (140mm or 160mm would be better yet). Fan placement preferably be behind the front panel, in front of the drives, drawing cool air in.

A large front panel intake fan at the bottom of the front panel does wonders for interior cooling. The fan pushing air in helps establish a proper balance of air pressures inside the case. A proper balance and low intake fan placement are the ideal conditions for optimal, front-to-back air flow through the case. And a good flow is what removes most of the heat.

Concentrating most of the incoming air through a filter prevents the majority of heat trapping dust from entering the case and blanketing the heat sensitive components. Occasionally washing an easy to remove air filter is a lot easier, and greatly reduces the number of times you will need to tear down the computer to lug it outside to clean.

I have used Vantec 120mm fans for years. They are quiet (important for a front fan) and they are all still running, as far as I know. I don't go for fancy lights because I tend to pay attention to my monitors and expect my cases to sit quietly and discreetly out of the way. But since you are making a custom, yet apparetently reserved ( :thumbsup: ) design to this, there are some fans with LEDs and a subdued (nothing flashing!) blue glow might look nice too.
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#21
Jorunn

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You know, if you put a large intake fan down at the the bottom of that front panel, then not only will you have a nice looking, custom front panel, but you will have an intelligent design custom front panel!


This is a good idea! Me front lower is spoken for, and infront of the HDD is too, but. The top half is open, it's not in front of the MoBo, but it's me best location.

A front intake fan with a removable, washable air filter would be smarter yet!


That is a wicked cool thought too. It makes me want to put the fan in front too.

Concentrating most of the incoming air through a filter prevents the majority of heat trapping dust from entering the case and blanketing the heat sensitive components. Occasionally washing an easy to remove air filter is a lot easier, and greatly reduces the number of times you will need to tear down the computer to lug it outside to clean.


Air in is valuable information, I was thinking of haveing a fan over the CPU to back it's fan. If I put the fan in the top front, then it will be a gentler flow, and maybe cooler.

I don't go for fancy lights because I tend to pay attention to my monitors and expect my cases to sit quietly and discreetly out of the way. But since you are making a custom, yet apparetently reserved ( :thumbsup: ) design to this, there are some fans with LEDs and a subdued (nothing flashing!) blue glow might look nice too.


I did fond a 120mm, red LED, 2000 RPM, silent model that i thought would look cool. The other lights are for the power on, and HDD active. I have a hearing problem, and it's a good satus indicator.

I spent the week working on a idea for the side panel.

[attachment=56202:weave.jpg]

This is a unfinished example. I was thinking cane, but that is harder to weave, I was also thinking a nylon color string, but couldn't make up me mind.
Any suggestions on this? If I make panel under the MoBo solid and the panel over it, open like this, there be plenty of unrestricted air flow out. Another thought was to leave it solid and have the weave over it. SO many chosses, I real do need hep on this!
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#22
Digerati

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was thinking of haveing a fan over the CPU to back it's fan.

Many cases have side panels fans for this purpose. However, I have done much testing on this over the years and have found in most instances, the side panel fans do NOT help. In fact, in some instances, cooling got worse. I concluded this was because the side panel fan introduced turbulence inside the case, disrupting the desired front-to-back "flow" through the case. Remember, the CPU's fan is designed to toss up the heat into that flow where it is carried out the back.

In looking at your case image in post #16 above, it looks like you have plenty of room near the bottom. That is the preferred front location - not the top. The bottom location works better with the Laws of Physics where heat "naturally" rises.
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#23
Jorunn

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Well I just messed up the staining process, cause I tried a new type of stain. I will be making a new front. The lower area is where the old speaker bump is at. Would it be okay to have the fan on the inside, and I make some sort of grill on the front?

[attachment=56213:Speaker bump.jpg]

Now I am thinking on covering the fron and sides in vinly, maybe I can find a leather looking material.

Cutting a hole over the bump will let me set the front flush on the cabinet, and I can make a grill cover that pops out for a filter on somesort behind it. This will soften the red LED in the fan, which will be nice.

If i can put a second fan in the top back, this would make circulation too, but I have one SYS FAN jack?

I have been hearing of these solid state hard drives, are they effecient?
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#24
Digerati

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Would it be okay to have the fan on the inside, and I make some sort of grill on the front?

As long as the flow has a clean shot into the case, sure.

You mentioned the speaker bump before, but I quess I thought that was in the old faceplate, not the chassis itself. Thatlooks like it would block a lot of the air. But it also looks like it has screw holes for perhaps an 80mm or a 120mm fan.
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#25
Jorunn

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DISATER
has struck.:blush:

I took the Mobo tray out and set it on the floor while I took the frame to work. At work, I cut out the bump out on the front bottom to mount the fan.

At noon I got a text "Come home quick! The hot water tank busted! The basement is flooding!" :help:

When I got to the basement, the water was deepest in my room, at least 2 inches. The Mob tray has about 3" of clearance. When the moister is out of the basement, I will have time to get back into the computer build.

I pray that the Mobo was not damaged. I couldn’t upload pictures this time, so when I get back into the build I will start a new thread and limit me pic’s some. Maybe by then I will have some on the case done.

Later, my fine geek friends, your help was appreciated! :wub:


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#26
Troy

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:(
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#27
Digerati

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That is too bad. If you have not done so already, remove the CMOS battery NOW!

I would put that motherboard (and all your other electronic devices) in a warm, dry, well ventilated place and leave it for at least a week to completely dry. You definitely do NOT want mold to start growing on your electronics. If you have access to an air compressor (one properly configured with a decent in-line moisture and particulate filter), I would, as soon as possible, blast every crack, crevice, and component to drive out any trapped water.

This is actually worse than spilling water on the board as dust, dirt, and oily dander will be picked up by the flooding water and deposited on the board. If this motherboard was submerged in this flood water, I might be tempted to wash it again, with clean water, or perhaps 50/50 water/isopropyl alcohol. The alcohol promotes rapid evaporation/drying. Do not use electrical contact cleaner, except on the contacts as it can eat the protective resin coatings that help prevent corrosion on the traces and other components.

Good luck.
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