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Replaced Power Supply. Now Computer Starts briefly then stops.


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#1
Damian Gerstner

Damian Gerstner

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I just replaced my blown Dell power supply with an exact replacement power supply. I think every cable has been reconnected properly. I plug in the power, press the start button. The computer starts briefly, the mother board fan runs for about 1.5 seconds and then shuts off. I have seen similar posts on this topic in this network, but not for this specific model. Is there a way to reset the system so that it can run again?

Thanks.
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#2
Damian Gerstner

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Just in case you cannot view my profile, here are my system specs:
Dell Dimension 9200
Dual In-line Memory Module, 1G 667M, 128X64, 8, 240, 2RX8 (4 total)
Processor, 6600, 2.4, 4M, Core Duo-conroe, Burn 2
Card, Planar, Matrix Tank Desktop, V2, Dimension 9200/410
ASSEMBLY..., CHASSIS..., MATRIX TANK DESKTOP..., 9200, L5+
Card, Graphics, 258, 8600 MRMGA+3B
Dell L375-60 Power Supply, PN # PS-6371-1DF2-LF
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#3
Digerati

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Hi Damian and :welcome:

Why did you replace the PSU in the first place? What were the symptoms before? Obviously, you need to double check to ensure all the necessary cables are properly and securely fastened.
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#4
Damian Gerstner

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I moved to Germany. I had checked to make sure my power supply was good for European voltage, so I thought I was good. I didn't realize I needed to flip a switch on the PSU until after I had turned it on, so it blew. I have a new power supply, but the computer will not fully turn on. I'm hoping that it is a simple fix and not that something downstream of the PSU blew. I'm an engineer and technically oriented, but I lack tools, etc. to test individual components. Let me know if you have any ideas on how to proceed. I saw another post for a different type of computer that suggested pulling all power from the system, removing PCI cards and then changing a jumper temporarily and then returning everything back to the way it was. My assumption was that it was a way to discharge some power, or to reset the system.

The system was not plugged in for about 3 months. Any chance that I need to replace the battery that looks like a watch battery?
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#5
Digerati

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I'm hoping that it is a simple fix and not that something downstream of the PSU blew.

Well, that was certainly my first thought. And sadly, that "something" would likely be the regulator circuits on the motherboard, and if really unlucky, everything plugged into that. :(

If you are certain this new PSU is good, and all power cables to the motherboard (there are typically 2, sometimes 3) are fastened, then about all you can hope for is a cable was knocked loose during shipping, or while replacing the PSU. Or perhaps the CPU HSF assembly came loose during shipping.

I saw another post for a different type of computer that suggested pulling all power from the system, removing PCI cards and then changing a jumper temporarily and then returning everything back to the way it was.

Unplugging from the wall, touching bare metal of the case interior to discharge static in your body, then moving the CMOS reset jumper for a few seconds will reset the BIOS. Replacing the CMOS battery will also reset the BIOS (again, with system unplugged). The battery should not be bad due to 3 months of no use. But they are cheap so you are out little for trying.

Without a spare CPU to try (and perhaps sacrifice), I am afraid there is little hope of troubleshooting this on your own. About the only thing else to try is one stick of RAM at a time.
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#6
Damian Gerstner

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What a doofus I am. I missed one small cable that needed to be plugged in. Thanks for making me take a closer look at it again!
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#7
Digerati

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What a doofus I am. I missed one small cable that needed to be plugged in. Thanks for making me take a closer look at it again!

Anyone who says they haven't been there are probably lying to you!

Glad you got it sorted out and thanks for the followup.
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