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Replacing Motherboard + CPU + Case


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#1
Dr. Skittles

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Hey guys, think I can get some suggestions?

One of my friends recently got into PC gaming, so as a welcoming gift I took a slightly outdated HP (not sure what model it is) and slapped a Rosewill Libertas Series LIB-650 650W PSU (http://www.newegg.co...N82E16817182101) and a MSI TwinFrozr GeForce GTX 275 (http://www.newegg.co...N82E16814127429) in it. The computer ran well for a few months, then the motherboard kicked the bucket.

My friend wants to get a new motherboard, CPU and case. His max budget is $240, but he isn't going to be maxing out every game he plays any time soon.

What would your guys' suggestions be for the provided budget?

Parts he already has:

RAM: Kingston HyperX 8GB DDR3 1600MHz http://www.newegg.co...600C9D3P1K2/8G"

PSU: Rosewill Libertas Series LIB-650 650W http://www.newegg.co...82E16817182101]

Graphics Card: MSI TwinFrozr GeForce GTX 275 http://www.newegg.co...N82E16814127429

CD/DVD-ROM Reader/Writer, 500GB 7200RPM HDD.

Thanks for taking the time to read through this.

Edited by Dr. Skittles, 06 March 2012 - 11:52 PM.

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#2
Digerati

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Hi Doc and :welcome:

A new case, motherboard and CPU for $240 is not much of a budget. Also, It is very important to note that the motherboard is considered the heart and soul of the computer and as such, for licensing purposes, new motherboard is considered a new computer. A common mistake many users make is they assume they can use their old Windows license on a new computer (or upgraded motherboard). Understand only a "boxed" full Retail license can be transferred to a new computer (or upgraded motherboard). It is illegal to use an OEM license that came with or was purchased for one computer on another computer. A disk “branded” with a computer maker’s brand name, or is labeled with “OEM/System Builder”, “Upgrade”, “Academic Edition”, or "For Distribution with a new PC only", is not transferable to a new PC (or upgraded motherboard) under any circumstances. These OEM licenses are inextricably tied to the "original equipment". So if that is the case, I recommend 64-bit Windows 7 or one of the many free Linux alternatives. Just ensure it is 64-bit since you listed 8Gb of RAM.
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#3
bayernmunich

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hi digerati i know this is not my thread by i just want to ask regarding the OEM LICENSE..... will i still be able to install OS on new motherboard but it is illegal or THE MICROSOFT will going to detect it and they will not let me install it on new motherboard??? if my motherboard is got damage and cant be use anymore and i bought a new motherboard will it be okay to transfer my OS to new motherboard if its OEM?? you said OEM Is tied with original motherboard but what if im not using it anymore and just use the new motherboard?? and if its full retail version can i use the disk to install on computer as many as i want???? im sorry im a bit confuse regarding this thing....
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#4
Digerati

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will i still be able to install OS on new motherboard but it is illegal or THE MICROSOFT will going to detect it and they will not let me install it on new motherboard???

Technically, you will be able to install the operating system with the new board. But note that is like running a Stop sign. Technically you can - but legally? (See note below).

Will you get caught? Maybe. After you install the OS, you will need to authenticate it with Microsoft and it is then it may be detected as having been installed on another computer. You may be instructed to contact Microsoft, where you will be expected to tell them the truth about what you are doing. Not telling the truth is deceit, or legally called "fraud".

if my motherboard is got damage and cant be use anymore and i bought a new motherboard will it be okay to transfer my OS to new motherboard if its OEM??

If you are replacing the old motherboard with a new motherboard as part of a repair action because the first board failed, then you can use the same license only IF the replacement board is an EXACT model replacement from the same maker. If the original model is no longer in production, you must use the suggested replacement by the same board maker. You can NOT take that opportunity to "upgrade" to a newer, better board.

you said OEM Is tied with original motherboard but what if im not using it anymore and just use the new motherboard??

If the OEM equipment is no longer being used, then the OEM Windows license gets retired with the hardware. Period. No exceptions. If you giveaway or sell the computer, the license (and installation disks) should go with it.

Bottom line in the vast majority of circumstances is this: new motherboard = new computer therefore requires new OS license.

if its full retail version can i use the disk to install on computer as many as i want????

Yes, but it can only be installed on one computer at a time. If you buy/build a new computer, you must uninstall the old installation first.

NOTE: With "branded" OEM licenses - "branded" being OEM disks from Dell, HP, Acer etc. that have been "branded" or labeled as from Dell, HP, etc., - are often modified or hard-coded to look for their own branded products. That is, if the OEM disk came with a Dell computer, it is likely the Dell disk will look for Dell BIOS information during the install. And if your new motherboard is not from Dell, the install will abort.

Is it fair? Yes. If you want to have flexibility, you buy the full retail license. If you want to save some money, you buy the less expensive OEM license and put up with the limitations. Of course, if you want to save more money, or want to avoid making Microsoft richer, you have the option of using one of the many capable and "FREE" Linux alternatives.
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#5
bayernmunich

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thats fast reply... thank you so much digerati.... regarding full retail you said i can use it many times as i want as long as i uninstalled it on my old computer first... how will microsoft going to find out that i uninstalled it already??? uninstalling the OS means formatting it right? or is there other way to uninstall it by typing a product code or something?? if formatting is the only way then once i format my drive will microsoft will already know that i uninstalled it???
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#6
Digerati

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how will microsoft going to find out that i uninstalled it already???

I keep getting the feeling you are looking for ways to get around this - to find some way to get away with illegally using Windows. I hope that is not the case and you are just trying to sort it all out. Remember, there are perfectly legal free alternatives to Windows.

How will MS know? They won't - not exactly. There is a an honor system here based on your binding agreement to use the software in accordance to the EULA when you checked that little agreement box when you first used that copy of Windows. So regardless, you entered a contract by agreeing with the EULA and it is up to you to police yourself.

Also note if both computers with the same license connect to the Internet at the same time, that can be detected by MS.
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#7
rshaffer61

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My question is if you are buying a new mb, cpu and memory why would you put a OS on it that is not going to be supported at all in less then 2 years? Most likely that mb will not be supported by XP so why limit your system?
Purchase Win7 and your system not only will be up to date but also will be legal as Digerati has pointed out. I have a legal copy of XP, Win7 and now Winn8 installed on my OS drive on different partitions and honestly I can't remember the last time I booted to my XP partition. Win7 it has been 2 weeks since I was on that partition as I am testing Win8 to see what differences are good and bad. Now to answer a question you may have I built this system over 2 years ago when XP was still a viable OS and manufacturers were still making drivers for programs and hardware.
If it was not for the fact that a lot of folks still use XP I would delete it and run only Win7 and Win8. In closing I ask again why limit the capabilities of your system with XP and not take the jump to a newer OS with support still happening on a regular basis? ;)
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#8
bayernmunich

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thank you digerati.... i know that i sound like i wanted to have FREE MICROSOFT but im not.... actually im not doing anything.... during my freetime i spend my time here in geeks to go to learn to troubleshoot computers... i just like the feeling when i know how to troubleshoot so im trying to learn from here... i dont have both OEM disc and FULL RETAIL disc ... so i actually can't try this things hands-on, thats why im asking and i dont want to spend money buying the disc just to figure this out...again thank you very much
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#9
Digerati

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I appreciate the understanding. When addressing this issue I am sometimes accused of defending Microsoft because I am an MVP. It has nothing to do with that at all. I am against and speak out against the illegal use and distribution of all copyrighted materials, including tunes, videos, published writings, and software, regardless the maker (AKA: victim). But it is not about that either. It is all about security and security trumps all.

It is a well known fact, at least among those who stay "security aware", that computers running illegal copies of Windows are frequently compromised by badguys then used to distribute malware, spam, or to participate in a bot-net army to launch DDoS attacks on others. And this is because they fear Microsoft, law enforcement or other anti-software piracy organizations may be watching and fail to keep their systems patched and updated with latest critical Windows Updates. The badguys know this well and being bottom-feeders, seek out those "easy pickings" vulnerable machines. Once compromised, they can be used for all sorts of nefarious deeds - remotely by the badguy at will - with the user oblivious to it all.

When a machine becomes compromised, as those running illegal copies of software often do, that affects the security not only of the user, but of rest of us too, including me and my kids and grandkids. So my objection to illegal use of software licenses and illegal filesharing of tunes and videos via torrents and P2P sites is about keeping the rest of us safe. Having supported secure communications networks for 40+ years, and knowing the damage the can be done to organizations, governments, our computers, us, our children (sometimes to the most heinous degree! :upset: :angry:), I take security seriously.

To be sure, the home user who once every few years moves an OEM license from one computer to another is not likely a malicious contributor to the security woes of the world today. But his machine might be.

***

As to rshaffer's comment about XP being antiquated, I agree. It is legacy stuff, designed over 10 years ago to support DOS era hardware and software from 10 years before that. Designed with security as an afterthought.

If you are buying new hardware, do yourself a favor and buy Windows 7 64-bit. Drivers are not an issue. Your hardware will love Windows 7 and Windows 7 will love, and take advantage of (a good thing) the modern hardware. And Windows 7 was designed with security first, and the 64-bit version has a couple more security features over the 32-bit version (which is becoming a legacy architecture anyway.
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