Jump to content

Welcome to Geeks to Go - Register now for FREE

Geeks To Go is a helpful hub, where thousands of volunteer geeks quickly serve friendly answers and support. Check out the forums and get free advice from the experts. Register now to gain access to all of our features, it's FREE and only takes one minute. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more.

Create Account How it Works
Photo

Scared to turn it on.


  • Please log in to reply

#1
Jorunn

Jorunn

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 22 posts
I'm back. :lol:

I was making the custom case awhile back (http://www.geekstogo.com/forum/topic/314056-25-year-old-case-new-parts-help/), Then the hot water tank decided to flood the basement and some of me stuff got scrapped.

Well, I replaced the MoBo with the same, Gigabyte GA-Z68MA-D2H-B3 with a i3 2125. I reused the CX500 power supply, DDR3, used 320HD and new DVD drive. Because my messing around, taking so long, cost me a MoBo, I decided I buy a case. (http://www.memoryexpress.com/Products/MX24182) It has three LED fans, quick connects for drives, a clear side (so I can watch the parts move around as the work :whistling: ), and I got like half a million USB ports on this thing.

I haven`t turn the power on yet, kinda scared. I have bad luck sometimes! Will you guys ask me some question and stuff to kinda check it out and give me confidence?
  • 0

Advertisements


#2
Digerati

Digerati

    Grumpy Ol' MSgt (Ret.)

  • Retired Staff
  • 3,997 posts
  • MVP
Well, first, triple check to ensure you have not installed more standoffs in the case than the motherboard needs. Since cases are designed to support 1000s of motherboards, they typically have more mounting holes than any given motherboard requires. So you MUST ensure you don't have an extra standoff under the board that may short out the board (and anything plugged into it).

You may consider assembling the computer outside the case first on a wooden breadboard or the like. You can start with the CPU, HSF, graphics solution (if not on-board) with monitor, and 1 stick of RAM. No drives. You should see the boot process make it through POST, then halt when it cannot find a boot drive. If that works, then verify your standoffs, and install the motherboard in the case with your full complement of RAM.

As for your side window, while I am not a fan of fancy cases (I think they should sit quietly and discreetly off to the side and NOT draw attention to themselves - since I prefer to pay attention to what's on my monitors) side windows are nice for conducting REQUIRED monthly inspections for dust build-up an fan operation without having to tear-down the computer and pop open the case. And too that, as I mentioned several times in your other thread, a case with removable, washable, air filters minimizes the number of times you will need to tear-down and clean the interior, but sadly, that CM case does not have them. So not a case I would get, but at least it does offer lots of cooling options.
  • 0

#3
Jorunn

Jorunn

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 22 posts

You may consider assembling the computer outside the case first on a wooden breadboard or the like. You can start with the CPU, HSF, graphics solution (if not on-board) with monitor, and 1 stick of RAM. No drives. You should see the boot process make it through POST, then halt when it cannot find a boot drive. If that works, then verify your standoffs, and install the motherboard in the case with your full complement of RAM.


I did the outside test, like you say. It looks good.

Well, first, triple check to ensure you have not installed more standoffs in the case than the motherboard needs. Since cases are designed to support 1000s of motherboards, they typically have more mounting holes than any given motherboard requires. So you MUST ensure you don't have an extra standoff under the board that may short out the board (and anything plugged into it).


The case came with this paper template, I took it and lined it up with the MoBo. Then put it in the case, and only installed those marked. The case has no extra post and all the post has align and screw down the MoBo. I feel very good about the post issue.

This does raise another question. The screws that hold the MoBo down are they special, like big round. Besides holding down the MoBo, do they serve another purpose?

20103515489155.jpg

The holes for the MoBo spots of solder that the screws will contact. I assume that this is for assuring low voltage ground. I used the 2nd row, 2nd type screw from the picture. I have seen some screw, (in the install kit, the kind with pliers and screw drivers) have fiber washers.

As for your side window, while I am not a fan of fancy cases (I think they should sit quietly and discreetly off to the side and NOT draw attention to themselves - since I prefer to pay attention to what's on my monitors) side windows are nice for conducting REQUIRED monthly inspections for dust build-up an fan operation without having to tear-down the computer and pop open the case. And too that, as I mentioned several times in your other thread, a case with removable, washable, air filters minimizes the number of times you will need to tear-down and clean the interior, but sadly, that CM case does not have them. So not a case I would get, but at least it does offer lots of cooling options.


Tell ya the truth, that is what I was thinking too. The front fan has a foam screen on the grill, like you suggested. Fresh air comes in the front, and over the MoBo. The exhaust fans will remove more than the incoming fan. This will be plenty of air exchange. Being able to see thru the window will give me heads up on dirt, bad case fans, or bad CPU fans. I am deaf, so the visual will help.
<BR style="mso-special-character: line-break"><BR style="mso-special-character: line-break">


  • 0

#4
Digerati

Digerati

    Grumpy Ol' MSgt (Ret.)

  • Retired Staff
  • 3,997 posts
  • MVP

This does raise another question. The screws that hold the MoBo down are they special, like big round. Besides holding down the MoBo, do they serve another purpose?

Well, there are specific screws, but they are not "special". And their purpose is to securely mount the motherboard to the case, plus they "ground" the motherboard to the case.

I assume that this is for assuring low voltage ground.

Not sure what you mean by low voltage ground. Ground should be 0V.

I never use those fiber washers. They are to help prevent cracking the motherboard due to over-torquing the screws. The screws should be tight, but not too tight. The solder, being soft metal, acts as a buffer and a washer - if not over tightened.
  • 0

#5
Jorunn

Jorunn

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 22 posts

I assume that this is for assuring low voltage ground.

Not sure what you mean by low voltage ground. Ground should be 0V.


Your first answer is the same, the srews are grounding the MoBo to the case. Which can only be low voltage or DC.

I have got the MoBo installed now and all the wires, I think I will disconnect the hard drive to get the same response as on the cardboard.

If i do the next difficulty will be installing the OS. I have WIN 7 in a green box. I think I just have to put the disk in and get a code from the web sight to activate. I think I get like 12 uses out of it, and I have only done it like 4 times?
  • 0

#6
Digerati

Digerati

    Grumpy Ol' MSgt (Ret.)

  • Retired Staff
  • 3,997 posts
  • MVP

Which can only be low voltage or DC.

:confused: That's not true at all! While a properly working PSU only provides 12V or lower, and only DC voltage, the grounds are also to short any high-voltage and/or AC component to ground too.

I think I just have to put the disk in and get a code from the web sight to activate. I think I get like 12 uses out of it, and I have only done it like 4 times?

No, the code to activate should be on the box, and on a label you attach to the case. And you only get 1 use, not 12.
  • 0

#7
Jorunn

Jorunn

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 22 posts
Well, I felt pretty good with the assembly, but it wouldn't turn on. The CPU comes on as long as the button is pressed. I am getting the manuals out figuring what happen. I put the continuity test on the reset switch wires, it works. The power switch didn't, I must have done something.


  • 0

#8
Digerati

Digerati

    Grumpy Ol' MSgt (Ret.)

  • Retired Staff
  • 3,997 posts
  • MVP

I put the continuity test on the reset switch wires, it works. The power switch didn't, I must have done something.

How did you test the power switch? You should be able to stick your meter into the two wires coming from the case's front panel power switch. Then when you press the button, you should see a short (0 ohms), but only while the button is pressed.

Also, make sure all the power connections have been made and are secure. Most motherboards take 2 and sometimes 3 separate connections from the PSU. Many graphics cards requires a separate power connection (or 2).
  • 0

#9
Jorunn

Jorunn

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 22 posts
Yes, I check the switch like you described. The one marked PWR, did work like that. I have my manuals and print outs, I will be going back thru it today.

I was so sure the first time, don't know what I did.
  • 0

#10
Digerati

Digerati

    Grumpy Ol' MSgt (Ret.)

  • Retired Staff
  • 3,997 posts
  • MVP
You should be able to short the two pins on the motherboard's front panel I/O header where those two power button wires go. You short them just for a second. If all works, this will signal the PSU to power up and start the computer.

I (very carefully and with a steady hand) use a flat tipped screwdriver to short just those two pins.
  • 0

#11
Jorunn

Jorunn

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 22 posts
Turns out the PSU was shot, brand new and has problems. I put a 250 in it, and it worked fine. Now I will get a PSU on pay day.


  • 0

#12
Digerati

Digerati

    Grumpy Ol' MSgt (Ret.)

  • Retired Staff
  • 3,997 posts
  • MVP
Sounds like a plan. I recommend getting a good PSU from a reputable maker. I like Corsair and Antec supplies. Just make sure it is 80-Plus certified.
  • 0

#13
Jorunn

Jorunn

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 22 posts
THE MONSTER LIVES!!!!

I picked up a CM 700 PSU for $80 bucks and WIN 7 for $112, slapped it in and BINGO!

RECAP;

I bought;

Gigabyte GA-Z68MA-D2H-B3 mother board $100
i3 2125, $170
Patriot 2x2 DDR3 1333MHz $25
CM storm scout case $90
used sata 320G hard drive $55
DVD drive $32
Front panel USBs $30
CM 700 PSU $80
WIN 7 $112
$694

I think that is not a bad price.
I installed the motherboard standoff pins, assuring there be no extra, and all in the right place. The screws in the motherboard are snug tight, not wrenching. Power supply is simple, it came with plastic ties for tying wires. Most of the wires were labeld.

In all, it turned out simple.:wub:
  • 0

#14
Digerati

Digerati

    Grumpy Ol' MSgt (Ret.)

  • Retired Staff
  • 3,997 posts
  • MVP
Super! That's good news.

Now make sure you have a decent anti-malware solution. I use and recommend Microsoft Security Essentials (MSE). I also use Windows Firewall and Secunia PSI - with it set to inform me when updates are available, rather and automatically install the updates. And of course, I keep Windows fully updated too.
  • 0






Similar Topics

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

As Featured On:

Microsoft Yahoo BBC MSN PC Magazine Washington Post HP