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Building my new computer


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#16
NKGuy

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Ok just make sure to use newegg.ca if you decide to shop from there.
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#17
Patrick Parent

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Any opinions on this bad boy? http://www.tigerdire...1786&CatId=4928
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#18
NKGuy

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Its not a bad choice the only thing is that you do not know what kind of hard drive it brings.
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#19
NKGuy

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Also the PSU is unknown as well.

Edited by NKGuy, 15 March 2012 - 03:47 AM.

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#20
Digerati

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I am afraid you are getting some mis-information concerning the case. You do NOT need a full ATX case! Those are huge and used to support large numbers of harddrives and EATX motherboards. As seen here, that mid tower TT case supports standard ATX boards, like virtually all mid-towers. That said, I will never buy a case again that does not have removable, washable air filters. I too like Antec cases, but note the Three Hundred supports ATX boards too.

To ensure compatibility, ALWAYS check your motherboard’s webpage for the QVLs (qualified vendors lists) for compatible RAM and CPUs. You MUST buy a CPU from the list but there are too many RAM makers and models for motherboard makers to test them all. So you must buy RAM with the same specifications as listed RAM.

A 500W PSU provides little headroom and little to no room for future expansion. I would prefer to see something in the 650W neighborhood. The PSU is one of the most critical components and one that requires considerable thought - but only AFTER you have selected all your other components, and added up their power requirements. The use of a good PSU calculator can help with that. When ready, I will post my canned text on sizing and selecting a good PSU.

I don't see an operating system listed. A common mistake is some users assume they can use their old Windows license on a new computer. Understand only a "boxed" full Retail license can be transferred to a new computer (or upgraded motherboard). It is illegal to use an OEM license that came with or was purchased for one computer on another computer. A disk “branded” with a computer maker’s brand name, or is labeled with “OEM/System Builder”, “Upgrade”, “Academic Edition”, or "For Distribution with a new PC only", is not transferable to a new PC (or upgraded motherboard) under any circumstances. These OEM licenses are inextricably tied to the "original equipment". So if that is the case, I recommend 64-bit Windows 7 or one of the many free Linux alternatives. Just ensure it is 64-bit since you have selected 8Gb of RAM.
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#21
Patrick Parent

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I think I will probably go with the build that we were talking about before. I would like to run through the process of building a computer myself. Although I'm guessing Windows 7 64 bit will be seperate.
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#22
Patrick Parent

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With that information provided Digerati, what would you recommend as alternatives to those which we were discussing before? I'm really just hoping to get the best performance for the money I'm spending without accidentally purchasing incompatible components. :P
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#23
Digerati

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That's like picking out a car for someone. There are just too many makes and models and colors and options to pick for someone else - when the bottom line, almost any will meet their "needs".

When I start a new build, the first decision must be AMD or Intel CPU. For my own systems, I go Intel but make no mistake - AMD makes excellent, reliable CPUs too. Then I pick a CPU. If budget allows, I go i7. If not, i5.

Then I find a motherboard that will meet my needs. That means it MUST support my current hardware, as well as any new I might buy over the next 4 years or so. Therefore, the motherboard must support the latest technologies - like SATA III, PCIe 3.0, USB 3.0. I prefer Gigabyte boards, but I like ASUS too.

For RAM, the "sweetspot" for 64-bit Windows 7 is 8Gb for dual-channel memory architecture motherboards (6Gb for triple channel). 8Gb is the sweetspot because less than 8Gb and you will see a drop in performance. More than 8Gb and the bang for the money rapidly diminishes - at least for most users.

I'm really just hoping to get the best performance for the money I'm spending without accidentally purchasing incompatible components.

And that should be everyone's primary goal! And that would be much easier if there were not 1000s and 1000s of options to choose from. But for sure, to ensure compatibility, ALWAYS check the motherboard QVLs. Virtually every motherboard maker posts them on the motherboard's webpage. Also note the ATX Form Factor Standard dictates that all ATX motherboards, ATX cases and ATX power supplies WILL physically and electrically fit and connect. Now there are some physical size problems when you get into µATX cases, and a very few "slim" cases, but generally, any ATX or smaller motherboard and any ATX PSU will fit in any mid-tower ATX case - that is all mounting screw holes, rear I/O panel ports, power connectors, and expansion slots will align perfectly - regardless the component maker. If only the notebook industry would support self-builders that way. :(

Good timing! This month's edition out today, check out Toms Hardware - Best Graphics Cards for the Money, March 2012.

What are you bringing to the table? That is, does your budget include a new monitor too? Keyboard? Mouse? Speakers? UPS?
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#24
Patrick Parent

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I would prefer about the $1200 range with no peripherals. Tons of great information that I'm getting here; I feel like im learning so much from few details. I will probably use the i5-2500k with a http://www.asus.com/...TOOTH_P67/#CPUS mobo

Ram: CORSAIR Vengeance 8GB CMZ8GX3M2A1600C9B
PSU:CORSAIR Enthusiast Series TX650 V2 650W ATX12V v2.31/ EPS12V v2.92 80 PLUS BRONZE Certified
Case: http://www.thermalta...93&ID=2048#Tab0 guessing this as Idon't mind cleaning. If I can find a cheaper model that I like I'll definitely get it.
Video Card:...no idea at the moment haha
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#25
Patrick Parent

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potentially GeForce GTX 560 Ti or Radeon HD 6870
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#26
phillpower2

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Just to add my two cents worth - the Z68 platform MBs have more future upgrade potential than the P67 type an example for you http://www.newegg.co...N82E16813157271 pci-e 3.0 and Ivy Bridge ready etc
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#27
NKGuy

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potentially GeForce GTX 560 Ti or Radeon HD 6870

Ultimately it comes down to what you can get for the best price because both cards stack up well against each other.
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#28
phillpower2

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Some benchmarks for you http://www.videocard...orce GTX 560 Ti the HD 6870 comes out second best.
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#29
Patrick Parent

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Ok, so I have decided to go with the Radeon Video card. The mobo will be either the one I have already chosen or the one phil has recommended. So with these two decisions, how does the overall product look? I really wanna double and triple check before I order all of these :P
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#30
phillpower2

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Looks good to me :thumbsup:

NB: Personally I would opt for the i5 2500k as I don`t feel that the extra cash for the i7 2700k performance is worth it, just my opinion.
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