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possible processor problems ?


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#1
SKOOTERBUM

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i purchased this desktop tower the other day for a backup. it's an older Gateway E-4000.

I'm still learning about how these things work. a newbie. i am mechanically inclined, and can take the system apart and clean it, then put it back together with no problems. which i just did with this PC.

when i took it apart, it was obvious it had never been cleaned before. it looked like it was used as a dryer vent. when i removed the processors heat sink fan, the heat sink was "packed full" of lint. i am assuming the processor has been over heated many times. i did not remove the heat sink from the processor.

i am using the PC right now. it does work, but it often hangs up, and it takes a very long time to bring it out of sleep mode, which are my concerns. are these symptoms / signs of the processor being damaged / going bad ??

is there a way i can test this processor ??

i do have another processor that i believe to be good, that i can swap it out with if needed.

or am i going in the wrong direction with these symptoms ??


Ron
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#2
Troy

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Hello,

What I would suggest you do is pull the heatsink off the processor and clean them up with isopropyl alcohol. Then put a fresh layer of thermal paste on and reinstall.

As for the hangs I believe you would be looking in the wrong direction, it sounds like it is possibly overheating (which fresh thermal paste above should resolve) and/or hard drive problems.

You say it is "older", did you purchase it 2nd hand? Have you performed a fresh install of the operating system? Have you run any diagnostics or maintenance tools?

Troy
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#3
SKOOTERBUM

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hi Troy, thanks for your response !! i will do as suggested, and clean and re-install the heat sink.

yes it is a used PC i got 2nd hand.

yes i did a new installation of windows.

no i have not ran any diagnostics, or maintenance tools. what do you recommend that i do ??

i did find the air flow from the PSU was rather warm, so i removed the side cover from the tower. i am going to ad another fan to the system. should i have the new fan blowing fresh air into the tower, or should it pull the hot air out of the tower ?? or does it matter which way it moves the air as long as it works ??

also, it has an old 2002' western digital 80gb hard drive. there are no noises coming from the drive. i have not done anything with the drive other than deleting the old partition, and created a new one with fresh install of the OS.


Ron

Edited by SKOOTERBUM, 21 March 2012 - 07:24 PM.

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#4
Troy

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no i have not ran any diagnostics, or maintenance tools. what do you recommend that i do ??

i did find the air flow from the PSU was rather warm, so i removed the side cover from the tower. i am going to ad another fan to the system. should i have the new fan blowing fresh air into the tower, or should it pull the hot air out of the tower ?? or does it matter which way it moves the air as long as it works ??

also, it has an old 2002' western digital 80gb hard drive. there are no noises coming from the drive. i have not done anything with the drive other than deleting the old partition, and created a new one with fresh install of the OS.


I will deal with these three points.

1. and 3. First up you need to perform a full physical inspection inside the computer. In particular (now that you have cleaned it out), look for popped or leaking capacitors on the motherboard and graphics card, also anywhere else you can see capacitors (don't open the PSU to check though). Also take a careful look for signs of electrical damage or water damage. At a bare minimum you need to run a memory diagnostic such as Memtest86+, and also a HDD diagnostic. If anything fails then it will explain why performance has been freezing. If memory fails you will need to replace the faulty module(s), if the HDD fails then replace it. Just because there is no noise coming from the HDD doesn't mean it isn't dying. Also it might be a good idea to go into the BIOS and check the PSU voltages, normally there is a section where you can view CPU temperature, fan speeds, and voltages. If the PSU is operating outside of the range then this can cause issues also. If you need any help with these, let me know.

2. Airflow - preferably both if you can. One fan at the front sucking cool air in and one at the back exhausting the warm air.

3. Is dealt with in section 1.

Cheers
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#5
SKOOTERBUM

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well this problem has been solved....

Troy, one of the first things you mentioned was to check all of the capacitors. which is what i should have done when i had the system disassembled for cleaning.

I'm still learning.....

i did as you suggested, and found 3 capacitors that were buldging and leaking on there tops. this may not have been the source of my problem, but it sure was going to be a problem in the very near future.

so i scrapped this MB.

thanks Troy, for leading me in the right direction !!! i know now to do this check at the beginning of cleaning up a PC rather than after many hours spent trying to get it going.

you sir, saved me a lot more time being wasted on this system !!!

i do have a question about the different tools for checking a H-D. i found one tool named HDD CHECKER, or something like that. i ran it on the H-D in the PC in question, and the H-D was noted as being in critical condition. i then found a H-D tester on western digitals site. figuring it would be the best tool to use considering the H-D was a WD drive, i ran there test, and it showed the drive to be in good shape. i find this to be a bit confusing.

what are your thoughts on this ??

thank you for your time !!!!!

Ron
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#6
Troy

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Hi again,

Glad it helped. If you know someone who is an electronics engineer they might be able to replace the caps, I have heard of this being done. But I never bother myself, it's always quicker and cheaper to replace the motherboard - and that's usually what the customers want (quick and cheap)!!!

Best option for Hard Drive diagnostics is to run the manufacturer's utility, I find using a bootable CD you can make from the ISO on their website. I always recommend the long scan, often a drive will pass the quick scan and then fail on the long. If the drive is still in warranty and it fails, you will need to have a failure code when processing the warranty claim anyway.

Some good information on hard drive diagnostics and manufacturers:
http://www.tacktech....ay.cfm?ttid=287

Another good tool to use (within Windows) is HDTune, there is a free version for home use:
http://www.hdtune.com/

Also good to consider is a full format of the drive, and/or a full CHKDSK /R run from the CMD prompt within Windows.

Glad I could help.

Troy
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