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computer crashing, especially when playing videos


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#46
DavidinSF

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I would very much enjoy a smooth operations for a change...
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#47
DavidinSF

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I get the impression that if I upgrade to Windows 7 Ultimate from Windows XP Professional, I won't have to reformat my hard drive and can just have the new operating system overwrite the existing OS with all my data left "untouched".

Is my assumption correct? Even if that action works, is it a smart way to proceed, since I'm pretty sure I have one or more viruses on my desktop and I don't want them to migrate to te new OS? Is it better just to save data, reformat hard drive and then install Windows 7 Professional on my desktop?

Many thanks
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#48
Macboatmaster

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1. If you wish to ensure the installation is clean then go, as I advised previously to our Malware forum I provided you with the link



2. Re the upgrade
http://windows.micro...asked-questions

and this for the specific answer
http://windows.micro...xp-to-windows-7

3. Did you check the compatibility on the link I sent previously
http://windows.micro...upgrade-advisor

and here you can check any software you have concerns with or if you di not have it checked on the link above external hardware
http://www.microsoft...us/default.aspx

4. If you wished and the installation was pronounced clean by one of our Malware experts and you have sufficient capacity you can install 7 on a new parttion and have a dual boot with XP - although you should be aware that 7 can run in compatability mode AND you can install XP anyway as here
http://www.microsoft...c/download.aspx

I hope you do not find that all too confusing

In summary the answer is
You can buy the upgrade and either follow the guidance in the first link with 7 professional
OR providing you have a XP system installed, you can still do a clean install of 7.
The essence of the upgrade edition is that it must detect an already insta\lled operating system.
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#49
DavidinSF

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Many thanks!
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#50
DavidinSF

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Hi,

I installed Windows 7 Professional on my desktop -- a clean install is what I did, as opposed to an Upgrade install. The good news is that the new OS appears to be working fairly well and I have Internet access.

The bad news is that my desktop is still crashing, even with this new OS.

What kind of diagnostics/repair efforts do you recommend for my desktop under these circumstances?

Thanks
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#51
Macboatmaster

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To save me reading the whole topic again, when you opened the case and cleaned it, you presumably saw the ram. sticks

I cannot remember now, your apparent level of experience, but if you feel competant and after taking the usual precautions for anti-static, release the clips at each end of the ram stick, they simply push away and down from the stick and the ram can then easily be taken out

If you have two sticks, and two slots, take out the one furthest from the processor.

Try it.

If it still crashes, take the remaining one out and put back in THAT same slot the one you took out first.

To reinsert the ram, you note the oreintation of the slot on the bottom edge, match with the ram slot on the motherboard, gently, checking the the edges are in line with the slots on the clip, push down on gthe top edge and the clips will move back into place.

When you have the case open, if you have more than two slots, either check the motherboard manual to see where the one stick must be left to boot, or if you have not already told me post me details of the board

NOTE

I have checked now you have 4 sticks of ram, one in each slot.
Take out two sticks to start with.
Leave one stick in each of the SAME colour slots.
You will have to check with the manual to see which channel, should be populated to boot with just the two sticks -

If it still crashes CHANGE ONE stick at a time with one of the two you took out., retesting after each change, on the premise that one of the two originally left in is the faulty stick

If it does NOT crash - do the same on the premise that ONE of the TWO you took out originally is the faulty stick.

My advice is to write ONE TWO THREE and FOUR on a piece of card.
Place the two you take out in the approrpriate positions, according to the slots either 1234 from the processor OR the actual numbers on the motherboard.

Retain the sticks in their respective positions on the card, otherwise you will USUALLY get yourself confused.

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