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Amd64 & i386 stray folders in my HDD. What is it?


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#1
chromejael

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I have a desktop using Windows XP.

In one of my HDDs, there are 2 folders with uber-lengthy names, eg.38cnbs92j7cn739c93c. The contents of those folders include more sub-folders with the title "amd64" and "i386".

What are they? They've been there for 2 years, and only up till recently, I decided to do some HDD spring cleaning to free up valuable space.

It's annoying because it's cluttering up my HDD, and it's not even packed into one neat folder.

I tried deleting it, but it message popped-up saying I don't have permission.

Can I delete it?
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#2
rshaffer61

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Simply put NOPE.
The I386 folder are the system drivers and default settings for your system. The AMD64 folder is for your processor and any 64 bit application corresponding drivers. Both are needed for your system to run correctly and in case of a problem they help to replace corrupted or failed drivers on your system via a SFC diagnostics program.
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#3
chromejael

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I see.....

But why did it have to install itself in my biggest HDD? I have 4 physical internal HDDs. Why didn't it install itself in the usual C: drive?

What happens in the event that I have to remove the HDD that its installed itself in? Is there a way to safely re-locate the files to the C: drive?
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#4
rshaffer61

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Normally The I386 folder is located on your Windows XP CD. Many people copy the
I386 folder down to their computer so that they do not have to insert
the CD every time Windows needs to copy system files over when new
hardware is installed or new windows components are added.
You can move the folder to your C drive but you would then have to do some registry editing to tell it where it is then.
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#5
chromejael

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Yes, I would like to do that.

I have little to no experience when it comes to editing Registries on my own, and tampering with crucial Windows files. Could you show me a step-by-step? I have a real fear that I may damage PC when it comes to fixes like these.
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#6
rshaffer61

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OK first you need to move the folder to whatever drive you want it on. Before doing this I have to tell you that this folder is only used when windows needs to find system files during a installation of the OS, corruption or in some instances a program installation. If you have a Genuine Microsoft Windows XP installation disk the I386 folder is located on that disk.
Is your system a branded system or a custom built because that may answer why it is on a different drive.

After that then you will need to do the following.


Go Start and then Run
type in regedit and click OK


Navigate to the following key:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Setup

You will see various entries Values on the right hand side.

The one we want is called: SourcePath

It probably has an entry pointing to your CD-ROM drive, usually D and that is why it is asking for the XP CD.
All we need to do is change it to: C:
Now, double click the SourcePatch setting and a new box will pop up.
Change the drive letter from your CD drive to your root drive, usually C:
Close Registry Editor.
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#7
chromejael

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I'm not sure what you mean by custom built, but I did add that drive later on, way after I installed XP on my desktop. So yeah, it wasn't originally there when I first bought the desktop, I added it 3 years later.

Before I do this, I would just like to confirm that we are both talking about the same folders.

Here are the 2 stray folders :

Posted Image

The contents of the 1st folder :

Posted Image

The contents of the 2nd folder :

Posted Image


Sorry, I forgot to be more specific about the details. It's actually 2 stray folders, one of 'em has the amd64/i386 files, and the other has about 30 files including one titled "HotFixInstaller".

Do I use your method on both stray folders?
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#8
rshaffer61

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Yes

Do I use your method on both stray folders?


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#9
chromejael

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I got a "Cannot copy file: access is denied" error for both the "6aa35aa63d211f96b53852" and "56231482a2d89f3921627f50b71baa" folders.

I tried to cut and paste it in C: drive, but it didn't work.
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#10
rshaffer61

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OK you may need to take ownership of the folders first.
Follow the instructions from Microsoft HERE to take ownership and then retry the moving of the folders.
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#11
chromejael

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It still won't move, keeps giving me the same error.

Some of the steps from that Microsoft article you provided, were vague.

for step 4:
"4.In the Name list, click your user name, or click Administrator if you are logged in as Administrator, or click the Administrators group"

There were 2 names available.

Furthermore, there were 2 usernames available during the start-up user account mode, Administrator, or my own name. I tried the method under both accounts, both didn't work.

and the final step 6:
"6...........reapply the permissions and security settings that you want for the folder and its contents."

I'm not sure if I'm suppose to do something specific with this, or just click OK and be done with it
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#12
rshaffer61

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Looks like you did everything correct and they may not be able to be moved.
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#13
chromejael

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Well, the contents directly in the "56231482a2d89f3921627f50b71baa" folder, specifically the 6 non-folder files, were able to move to the C:drive, but every folder within the 1st level of the folder did not.

Does that mean I have to inidivdually try the method for each of the 30 folders? I can do it, probably take about 10 minutes, but will it work in the end?
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#14
rshaffer61

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It should work theoretically but I can't guarantee that.
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#15
chromejael

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ok i will give it a shot
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