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Building a new PC


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#1
Exida

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I have no idea how to do it! No idea what I need. I do know what I want it to do though!
If someone could help me build something in a $1000-1200~ range with a good computer screen that'd be the best.
I want it to be able to play games with the good graphics option.
I plan on playing Diablo III and I know it requires certain type of Gfx Cards, so if that could be included in the budget so I can play it that'd be nice too xD.

I'll be playing games like Skyrim, or FPS' or RTS and WoW (Heard it was processor dependent)

I'd like to have a lot of RAM, or whats just needed. Memory storage isn't that big of an issue. My current PC has only 138gb of space.

I don't know how all much this will cost, I'd hope it will fit in my budget.

Help me out please and thanks!
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#2
iammykyl

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Hi Exida, Posted Image

What kind of computer do you have at the moment? if it would not be used in the future, we may be able to use some parts from it.
In what country will you be purchasing your parts?
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#3
Exida

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Hi! Thanks for the welcome! I have a Compaq Presario PC SR5505F. I recently added a 2g ram stick too it, because the cpu only has 1g without it. And i'll be buying parts in the U.S

Edited by Exida, 11 August 2012 - 09:56 PM.

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#4
iammykyl

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Here are the specs for your computer, > http://h10025.www1.h..._R1002_USEN#N33

It is max 4 years old, still a decent PC but most of the hardware is now quite outdated. The only useful parts would be the optical drive and HDD. Upgrading with a discrete GPU is possible but would require a PSU upgrade as well.

I would look for similar on eBay and see if it is worth selling and go with your first intention to build a new rig.
What do you think?
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#5
Exida

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I plan on giving the computer away actually (the old one). I have a friend who needs it.

Edited by Exida, 11 August 2012 - 11:57 PM.

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#6
phillpower2

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Hi Exida

While colleague iammykyl is offline here is a list of parts for you to consider http://pcpartpicker.com/p/erxZ

iammykyl may also have suggestions and will help you to tweak the list if it is needed.
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#7
iammykyl

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Thanks Phillpower2 for your selection. Mine is under, may be able to tweak the pair.


Exida

We have included W7 OS and unfortunately this adds $90 to the cost.
I have not included a mouse or keyboard. Everyone has such different preferences, I always think it is better to go to a store and do some hands on testing.


> http://pcpartpicker.com/p/erBk

Edited by iammykyl, 12 August 2012 - 06:56 AM.

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#8
phillpower2

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You are welcome iammykyl :thumbsup:

Two good selections for you Exida, you will notice that with the exception of the choice of PSU the core components are the same brand at least if not also the same item.
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#9
Exida

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They both look pretty nice to me, I really have no idea what all it does though haha. Well, thanks you two, I was looking for an alternative to an Alien ware PC, but it seems the pricing is about the same.

Thanks guys!
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#10
Exida

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Also! If theres a print out guide to putting a computer together... that'd be much welcomed. I have no idea what i'm doing!
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#11
Exida

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In both I see there is no sound card, does that mean I can't listen to anything on the computer?
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#12
phillpower2

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Also! If theres a print out guide to putting a computer together... that'd be much welcomed. I have no idea what i'm doing!

Build guide courtesy of Troy and Artellos respectively http://www.geekstogo...r-own-computer/

In both I see there is no sound card, does that mean I can't listen to anything on the computer?

Most modern MBs (motherboards) have that good of an integrated sound chip that you would need to spend a silly amount of money on an add on sound card before you would notice any difference, the suggested MB has a very good sound chip

NB: Rather than do multiple posts before you receive a reply can you please edit your last post to add new questions or information, thanks.
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#13
Macboatmaster

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Exida

In view of the fact that you are honest enough to admit, that you have no real experience of building a computer and using the guide my good colleague phillpower2 has sent you, MAY I suggest that you DO NOT gain the experience on your NEW BUILD of the parts you buy for this computer.

It is not difficult, these days, as it was in past years, as most connections to the motherboard are block connectors, with a blanked off or offset pins and providing you take reasonable care it is not as easy as it once was to make a mistake.

NEVERTHELESS it can still be done, and just a couple of months ago on this site, a person posted a problem, where the computer would not even boot, after his new build.

He had it transpired connected a POWER IN to a power out connector on the motherboard for a fan.

He consigned TWO motherboards to the scrap bin., making the same mistake twice.

MY strong advice is to obtain, even if necessary by buying, a computer that is past any real useful like, but working.

Possibly a friend or acquaintance may have one.

TAKE the computer completely apart.

Reassemble it. If it still works all is good, if it does not, then clearly something is wrong.

This old practice computer may well not be a copy of your new build, but the experience you gain will be invaluable.

I would say, in addition to the above that these are your main points to guide you and the main risks you need to avoid.

1. Take your time, there is no point in rushing the job. There are no prizes for speed.

2. Choose a time when if possible you will not be interrruped, even by telephone calls.

3. Your working area, should NOT be on a carpet or another static inducing surface. AND you need good light.

4. Before handling any components, take anti-static precuations - explained in the link.

5. When you buy the case, it normally comes with a packet of screws and other small parts. Stand - off posts for the motherboard. SORT these out into their various sizes and keep each group separate in sutiable containers.

6. EXAMINE carefully the location of the securing points for the motherboard and match those to the positions on the case - motherboard mounting area, so that you are SURE that stand-off posts are ONLY inserted into the case in those positions.

ONE stand off post in the wrong place can IMMEDIATELY consign a motherboard to the scrap bin, as soon as power is supplied.

7. Assemble the CPU and the cooler and fan on the board BEFORE putting the board in the case. NOTE this is the best way normally, as the force needed, although not great to install the cooler is usually best applied before the motherboard is in the case. ENSURE you are working on a level, surface and are not straining the board.

8. Generally it is best to install the PSU, especially if it is an upper mounted PSU, before the board, as if of course it slips from your hand onto the board, it MAYBE an expensive slip.

9.When connecting the main 24 pin power supply connection to the board and it is normally near the edge of the board, SUPPORT the board, on the edge. DO NOT forget the CPU power and the fans connections.

10. The motherboard will come with its own I/O plate, (Input - Output) for mouse, keyboard - maybe USB connections, sound connections, LAN (Network) and USB ports. This must be placed in the case and if one is already fitted, that one (the pre fitted one must be removed.)

11. If you are installing a graphics card, ensure that you know where this is going to be located on the rear of the case from its position on the board and remove the blanking plate in that location, BEFORE you install the board. This is VITAL on the cheaper cases where that blanking plate has to be broken away from its securing points. It is still best to do so, however on most cases where the blanking plate is frequently ona block of them, released by one securing clip or screw.

12. Depending on the type of case it is also usually easier to install the Optical drives DVD/CD and leave them temporarily secured by one screw, fastened only touch tight, before you install the PSU or motherboard. The fitting of these drives requires you usually to remove the blanking plate on the front of the case, and to do that the front panel has to be removed.

TAKE it slowly and carefully you will not be the first person to break one of the clips on the front panel.

13. The HDD inserts into its slot from the inside of the case. Take care with this and the optical drives that you do not mix up screws, as too long a screw in a HDD, will in some drives, damage the drive beyond redemption.

Some cases are cllips for the drive, which simply twist and lock and you do not have to use screws.

There are many other points and all you have to do is ask and someone will be here to help.

MY FINAL comment is that this is not a job where you can read the manual AFTER you have installed the motherboard.

I would urge you to read it at least twice before you start and check the connections from the PSU to the motherboard, to the HDD and the case connections to the motherboard for the USB, the front panel audio and the front panel header where the power, rest and leds connect VERY carefully before you start

FINALLY good luck




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#14
Exida

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Macboatmaster

Thanks for the advice! While I don't know anyone that would be willing to let me take apart their old computer the computer I'm using at the moment could do, no? I opened it once or twice and had a look though I haven't taken anything out. I read over the guide phillpower2 had linked me too, it seems to be informative on how things are generally handled. I'm not crazy enough to scrap something if it doesn't work the first time. I think that's a little excessive!

I'm sure if the manuals that come with the parts will be able to help greatly. But if I can't get it to work then I will take it to a local computer tech guy.
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#15
Macboatmaster

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As you think best.

. I'm not crazy enough to scrap something if it doesn't work the first time. I think that's a little excessive!


That person I was referring to

He consigned TWO motherboards to the scrap bin., making the same mistake twice


had no choice in the matter as he BLEW the two boards, by connecting the wrong item to the board.



I was trying to give you the best advice and as I said Good luck with it










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