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Clock Time in Win 7 Resets Itself


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#1
blueblue

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I first noticed this a week ago, it happened twice, for no reason, my clock time sets itself back many hours. Can someone give me some ideas on why this is happening? I hope it's not malware, I just reformatted a few weeks ago. When I mentioned it to the people helping me with a previous malware problem that caused me to reformat, one said it happened to him once, someone also said it could be a failing cmos battery. How do I check for that? I will look in the Windows Performance section and run some tests, too.

By the way, Java got the update yesterday. I was glad to see the warning about Java at this site, had disabled it, then last night the update came in.
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#2
rockmilk

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Cmos Batterys are so cheap, might just be a good idea to go ahead replace it.
Here are a couple of links that show how to replace a cmos battery.


For laptop.

For Desktop.

Most likely it is the Cmos battery let us know if the problem persist after changing the battery.
You can get the battery at your local walmart or even gas station.
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#3
blueblue

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Hi, thank you for your help, I will do that. It seems to be happening too often, in fact, I just looked, I had reset it a couple of hours ago and it now it's off again. I don't see any links where there should be for your instructions, maybe it's something I have blocked.

Edited by blueblue, 02 September 2012 - 11:59 AM.

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#4
blueblue

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Uhoh! I just read that some people who changed the cmos battery couldn't restart their computers! I'm afraid if this happens I'll lose all my data and settings, have to start all over again, still reading from searches to see if that happens, wouldn't surprise me. What a Bummer. :(

Edited by blueblue, 02 September 2012 - 12:12 PM.

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#5
rockmilk

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I highly doubt that changing the Cmos battry will brick your machine.
You can not see the youtube videos I posted?
Here they are.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cg_wvp1YdSI&feature=player_embedded
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ao866I9XpTo&feature=player_embedded

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#6
blueblue

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OK I see the links. Something in one of my blocking programs is preventing me from seeing the video, I'm trying to find what's causing that so I can see it.

Many, many years ago I replaced a battery in a desktop unit and it started up just fine, so I hope it'll be OK with this machine.
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#7
rockmilk

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What browser are you using you can try and disable any add ons that you have to enable you to see the youtube videos that I posted.
I have changed out many cmos batterys for friends and myself and as a part of sidework and have never had a machine not boot as a result.So from my experience I would say that it is 100% safe to change your cmos battery and I am 99% sure that is the problem in your case.
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#8
blueblue

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Hi, it's FF, I added a lot of plug-ins to block sites from tracking me and dumping on me. Anyway, I found what was blocking it and saw both videos, glad I did, the one for the desktop says touch something metal before changing the battery, the laptop one says to wear an antistatic bracelet, which I don't have. Thank you SO MUCH for your help. I've never done this on a laptop. My netbook is only 3 years old, I have another one that I got the same year I got this one, but who knows how long they sit on a shelf before being bought, and that battery could be old I guess, but I read someplace, they shouldn't need changing for about 8 years. I have another netbook I gave to someone, which is about 4 years old; neither of the other 2 have done this, only the one I use online now.

I'm lucky I have a spare battery, and any tools I may need to open the case.

Thanks again, I'll report back here again soon.:thumbsup:
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#9
blueblue

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Hi, I opened my computer but nothing looked anything like the videos. My friend and I watched the vids together and then opened up the machine, I took pics of it in case it'd hep, gonna search for schematic; Acer will be of no help unless I pay them, as we all know, my machine's out of warrenty and I don't have the $$ to pay.
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#10
Troy

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Hi blueblue,

A local PC repair store shouldn't charge too much to replace the CMOS battery, give a few a call and ask for cost? As for Acer warranty, even if it was under warranty you'd probably find that batteries are classed as a "consumable" and not covered under warranty anyway, I hear this a lot from my vendors and it doesn't make my clients happy.

You said it is an Acer netbook, right? What is the model number please?

To address a different part of the discussion, rockmilk, I can think of one reason why a machine may not boot up after changing the CMOS battery. If the system default setting for Hard Drives is to run in IDE emulation mode, but the current OS was installed with AHCI. Changing the CMOS battery will reset the BIOS settings to default and therefore as soon as Windows tries to load it would BSOD and reboot. I have seen this before. Any other kind of error would be cause for concern.

Troy
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#11
blueblue

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hi Troy, it's an AO532h. I never had this problem, and shouldn't be, as far as I know. My tech knowledge is minimal but I do my best, there's no one to help me. My friend knows less than me, but has better eyesight. It shouldn't be so difficult to get to a battery, I swear they do that on purpose, like we really have the bucks to shell out. We were sure we were looking at the battery, but when I pulled away a piece of plastic, it looked like the thing might be underneath, but not easily accessible. We're not comfortable tearing apart the computer. It's really frustrating, I have the dang battery and tools, but my friend says there's other screws that are not standard, that we have no tools for.

Can you give me an idea how much I'm looking at to pay for this service? I don't know if any stores are open today; the only one I know of is a bit far from me; I have to wait a couple of days to get there. Thank you for peeking in.
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#12
Troy

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I would have no idea as I'm in Australia. Make some phone calls and find out.

I do recommend, based on your information, that you don't attempt it yourself. It is quite difficult to pull them apart and even harder to get them back together again - and then practically impossible to get it back together and working!
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#13
blueblue

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:blush: Well I just made an expensive mistake, not realizing I had the clock set in the wrong timezone. I'll never live this one down but at least my battery is OK. While I was at the computer store I was also told the battery does not come out- imagine that! If it was the battery, I'd need to replace the motherboard! What a miserable setup that is!:angry:
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#14
Troy

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Well good news, I'm glad you got it resolved. You said that it was an "expensive" mistake... did the shop charge you to change the timezone?
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#15
blueblue

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hi Troy, they said they charged me for having to open up the computer. It wasn't as much as it would've been if they had to change the battery, or, uh, the motherboard, though likely it would've cost me more than they originally quoted, not knowing the battery is a permanent part of the motherboard. According to them, as I recall the explanation, the battery is a part of the motherboard, I don't recall the exact words the man used to explain it, though I could call and ask. All I know is it won't come out. That really stinks, but it could've been worse for me, so I guess I got away cheap.

What's strange about all this is, I'm sure I checked the timezone the last time the clock went wrong. Well, I suppose they should get something for the trouble of opening the computer. I was ready to leave, when I was told the fee, though I'd been there a few minutes packing the thing up. Being no one said anything immediately, I thought, since nothing was wrong, there was nothing to fix, there'd be no fee. WRONG! My logic failed me again, but that's not my fault.

Perhaps it's like having a mechanic take apart something on a car; or anyone working on something that can malfunction-they have to take time to do it, so there'd have to be a fee. If I were running a business that required some kind of labor, I'd hardly charge anything if nothing was wrong, depending on how difficult the job is. At least the fee was lowered from the original quote, but to me it's still an expensive mistake. :blush:

I do know there are other models that the battery can be removed without replacing anything else.

It's just like with cars, they're made so differently now, the days of the backyard mechanic are a thing of the past, unless the car is an older model, so many things can be done without as much expense. I don't drive, but a friend of mine who does, explains things to me, and I remember those days when people worked on their cars, and friends came to help them. It was an important part of our history.

I think that's also true of anything that can be repaired, companies set things up so no one can do it themselves, so they have to pay someone and the companies get richer. It seems that computers, and everything else, are being designed purposely to prevent just anyone from fixing them, or, it costs more to fix than replace. :upset:
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