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Slow speeds on 300Mbps


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#1
Phenoxy

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Dear Geeks2Go

I have acquired a fibre broadband connection, approximately providing me with a 150Mbps connection.
As I like to keep things wireless, I bought a router that would keep up with aforementioned speeds, thus leading me to purchase a router of the 300Mbps range.
Links to my respective specs are linked in appendix below

The problem:
I get speeds, 15Mbps at best, when testing from same source that got me 150Mbps ethernet connected.
My signal strength is 3/5 even though I am located VERY closely to the router.
My router supports N adapters.

How can I optimize my speed?

Router
http://www.tp-link.c...odel=TL-WR941ND

Network Adapter
http://www.tp-link.c...model=TL-WN951N

Every model is of the newest firmware and driverupdate.
Router is set to automatic settings.

Edited by Phenoxy, 06 September 2012 - 04:55 AM.

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#2
Phenoxy

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Do you still run your "no-answer by a certain date" policy?
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#3
Troy

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If you have a 150Mbps internet connection you are not doing yourself any favours by using that router - it has 10/100Mbps WAN PORT. This means your potential internet speed has already been cut by a third. To resolve this you would need a router with a gigabit WAN port. I don't understand how you can be getting 150Mbps with an ethernet cable when this is greater than the physical ports can allow.

As for the wireless, 3/5 when you are very close indicates something is wrong. Is there a clear line of sight between the router and the wireless network adapter aerials? Or is there doors/walls/etc in the way? Also 3/5 would simply be indicating the signal strength, but what actual speed is the wireless connecting at? Is it connecting at N speeds or is it (for some reason) connecting at G speeds?

Also how are you performing the speed testing?

Troy

(p.s. yes if you look on the front page you will see the Waiting Room forum, 3-days with no reply and you can request assistance there.)
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#4
Phenoxy

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If you have a 150Mbps internet connection you are not doing yourself any favours by using that router - it has 10/100Mbps WAN PORT. This means your potential internet speed has already been cut by a third. To resolve this you would need a router with a gigabit WAN port. I don't understand how you can be getting 150Mbps with an ethernet cable when this is greater than the physical ports can allow.

As for the wireless, 3/5 when you are very close indicates something is wrong. Is there a clear line of sight between the router and the wireless network adapter aerials? Or is there doors/walls/etc in the way? Also 3/5 would simply be indicating the signal strength, but what actual speed is the wireless connecting at? Is it connecting at N speeds or is it (for some reason) connecting at G speeds?

Also how are you performing the speed testing?

Troy

(p.s. yes if you look on the front page you will see the Waiting Room forum, 3-days with no reply and you can request assistance there.)


Fair point, speedtest.net shows around 120-130, not 150, ethernet connected but still nowhere near the 15-20mbps I get from wireless.

My signal strength might be a product of a wooden wall, but nothing that I haven't gotten 5/5 from before in similar situations. Hopefully it should connect with N speeds as both adapter & router is N enabled, but I do not know how to check so.

Could you suggest a router that would fit my needs?

Thank you for the answer.
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#5
Troy

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Can you get me a screenshot of your speedtest.net results? You can choose to link it. For example, here's mine:

Posted Image
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#6
Phenoxy

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Ethernet connected through router: (A little faster bypassing the router)
Posted Image
Wirelessly connected:
Posted Image
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#7
Troy

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Wow that's incredible speed. It seems to me two things:

1) Updating to a router which has a gigabit WAN port may see some improvement for the wired connection.

2) Your wireless connection does not seem to be connecting at native N speeds at all. Does the connection show what speed it is connecting at? To check you might need to login to the router and see if N mode is enabled for the wireless settings. Then let me know what OS you are running to check what connection speed it's at.

Troy
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#8
Phenoxy

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Thank you for the comment on my speeds, it warms my heart :3

In my 192.168.1.1 it shows:

Wireless
Channel: Auto (Current channel 9)
Mode: 11bgn mixed
Channel Width: Automatic
Max Tx Rate: 300Mbps
WDS Status: Disable

I run Windows 7 64-bit.
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#9
Phenoxy

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Thank you for the comment on my speeds, it warms my heart :3

In my 192.168.1.1 it shows:

Wireless
Channel: Auto (Current channel 9)
Mode: 11bgn mixed
Channel Width: Automatic
Max Tx Rate: 300Mbps
WDS Status: Disable

I run Windows 7 64-bit.



Mode: 11bgn mixed set to 11n only still produces slow speeds.
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#10
Troy

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Mode: 11bgn mixed set to 11n only still produces slow speeds.

That would have been my next suggestion... So that's a bit interesting somewhere along the line. My next train of thought would be to contact TP-Link support (seeing as you have both router and adapter by the same company) and see if they have any suggestions on the issue.
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#11
Phenoxy

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Thank you so much for your time and effort, it is much appreciated. I will contact TP Link support regarding the matter and, if you're interested, summarize the concluded progress in the thread.
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#12
Troy

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Yeah I am interested in what they say... Do post results if you are able.
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#13
admin

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If you run a mixed mode wireless network e.g. 802.11g + 802.11n, you will be capped at ~25Mps. If you need to support both on your network, a dual-band router may be in order. Also, your security settings affect connection speeds. Connect at WPA2 for maximum speeds. Finally 300Mps is theoretical output at maximum signal. In real-world practice expect half or less.
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#14
TheQuickBrownFox

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Can you get me a screenshot of your speedtest.net results? You can choose to link it. For example, here's mine:

Posted Image



Ethernet connected through router: (A little faster bypassing the router)
Posted Image
Wirelessly connected:
Posted Image


Wow...your Internet speeds are just...INCREDIBLE!
Even though Troy only has a C+ rating, with a little above the average I guess?? (58% better than others, it seems)

I will never post my speedtest.net results!
Our Internet speed here in the Philippines is embarrassing! :lol:
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