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Computer Blue Screens Randomly


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#16
ranchhand3

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I am sure that you know the proper procedure for applying Thermal Grease, but just to cover all the bases..... A very thin layer is all that is required, no more than the thickness of a sheet of paper. When you remove the heatsink, check that no grease has run down the side of the CPU onto the wafer board, that could cause the problems you have. Be sure to clean the old grease off the chip and the bottom of the heatsink first. Let us know how it goes!
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#17
Rusbel

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Alright thanks for the suggestions guys. So I did an inspection of the motherboard and did not find any issues. I also pulled out the CPU and everything looked fine there as well. I reset my bios and reinstalled Windows because my system had become corrupted, and then I had the random idea to take out a stick of memory since I do not have any other DDR3 memory, but I do have 2 sticks in this computer I figured if it was one of the sticks causing a problem perhaps I could isolate it. And guess what, I think it did. It has been a whole day since I did this and I have not had a single crash, not even of a program. Given, it is hard to troubleshoot this problem because it can be so fleeting. But my computer usually blue screens a lot while booting, and I have booted a lot of times since taking the stick out and not had a single crash. So it would seem the memory is related to this issue, but my question is whether it might not the fault of the memory. Is it possible that the MB or CPU is having trouble dealing with 2 sticks of memory?

Also HW Monitor is still showing some strange anomalies with minimum voltages, but also since I have been paying more attention to temps as well I have been noticing some very high max temps such as 100C on the CPU and MB, though "Value" never varies much, and if I restart the program everything resets back to normal, these things only happen after the program has been left open for a while.

Finally, the issue with downloads freezing and videos causing my computer to crash was actually fixed long ago by an ethernet driver that Gigabyte tech service was able to provide me, I somehow forgot about that so it has no relation to this current issue.
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#18
rshaffer61

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What happens if you switch the memory?
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#19
Rusbel

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Ok I swapped the sticks and haven't been able to get it to blue screen however over about 20 boots, but it did stall early in the boot a few times. At least 5 times it would start booting and I would hear the fans start to spin up but before anything would appear on screen the power would shut off. It did this a lot before when this stick was in, but more commonly it would blue screen later in the boot. More concerning though is the fact that the first two times I loaded into windows the computer froze pretty soon after getting in, and it has been lagging pretty badly. So it would seem there is something wrong with this stick and I will replace it. Thank you again for your help!
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#20
ranchhand3

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There is an easy check for your memory so you don't have to play the "exchange and guess" game..... you can use the (free) Memory test utility HERE. Use the precompiled bootable ISO (zip) file. Burn to a CD, set your BIOS to 1st boot device=CD and boot with it in the drive. Memtest will load and let it run until it says "complete" at the bottom of the screen, about 15 minutes. Any error posts at all will mean that stick is bad. Do each stick at a time.

100C on the CPU

That may or may not be an accurate reading; meltdown on these processors is somewhere around 90C. Be sure to activate your CPU warning in the BIOS. If that is a false warning, that's not good either because you will be getting false warnings so you don't really know how hot your unit is running, and that ain't good. Have you checked that all your case fans are running, including the power supply cooling fan? I have had those quit on me and it's easy to miss.

Edited by ranchhand3, 09 October 2012 - 05:24 AM.

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#21
rshaffer61

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You can try the memtest program but the test you just performed proves that memory module is the issue.
Ranchhand this is the instructions we use for memtest and you can see the first step is always the manual testing of the module as being the best way to test for faulty modules.

A If you have more than one RAM module installed, try starting computer with one RAM stick at a time.

NOTE Keep in mind, the manual check listed above is always superior to the software check, listed below. DO NOT proceed with memtest, if you can go with option A

B. If you have only one RAM stick installed...
...run memtest...


1. Download - Pre-Compiled Bootable ISO (.zip). If you prefer to use the USB version then use this link USB KEY
2. Unzip downloaded /memtest86+-4.20.iso.zip file.
3. Inside, you'll find /memtest86+-4.20.iso file.
4. Download, and install ImgBurn: http://www.imgburn.com/
5. Insert blank CD into your CD drive.
6. Open ImgBurn, and click on Write image file to disc
7. Click on Browse for a file... icon:

Posted Image

8. Locate memtest86+-4.20.iso file, and click Open button.
9. Click on ImgBurn green arrow to start burning bootable memtest86 CD:

Posted Image

10. Once the CD is created, boot from it, and memtest will automatically start to run. You may have to change the boot sequence in your BIOS to make it work right.

To change Boot Sequence in your BIOS

Reboot the system and at the first post screen (where it is counting up memory) start tapping the DEL button
This will enter you into the Bios\Cmos area.
Find the Advanced area and click Enter
Look for Boot Sequence or Boot Options and highlight that click Enter
Now highlight the first drive and follow the directions on the bottom of the screen on how to modify it and change it to CDrom.
Change the second drive to the C or Main Drive
Once that is done then click F10 to Save and Exit
You will prompted to enter Y to verify Save and Exit. Click Y and the system will now reboot with the new settings.


The running program will look something like this depending on the size and number of ram modules installed:


Posted Image

It's recommended to run 5-6 passes. Each pass contains very same 8 tests.

This will show the progress of the test. It can take a while. Be patient, or leave it running overnight.

Posted Image

The following image is the test results area:

Posted Image

The most important item here is the “errors” line. If you see ANY errors, even one, most likely, you have bad RAM.
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#22
Rusbel

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Ok thanks guys, I ran the test on both modules and the stick in question is here.

Posted Image

Looks conclusive, crash OOOOhhhh.

I ran the other stick through 2 full passes with no errors, but seeing your instructions I will go ahead and run it overnight.

Big thanks for all the help, I can't believe I didn't suspect the memory, it is always the memory. The system had so many problems when I first built it, most of which were solved by drivers, but I forgot what I had done to fix these problems and simply blended them all together. Even the speakers I started this system with had a strange problem that only appeared on this computer, yet it took me forever to figure out that it was not the computers fault. So glad to have this problem solved.
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#23
rshaffer61

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yep you have found your issue I'm sure. Since you ran all day without a problem with the system on the other module I would suspect replacing the bad module and you should be fine then. :thumbsup:
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#24
ranchhand3

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Yup. In 20 years of IT work I never had Memtest 86+ fail me or give a false reading yet. In fact, whenever I build a new unit the first thing I do is run Seagate's hard drive tester on all drives and Memtest 86+ on all memory sticks. I have found bad drives new from the factory and same for memory sticks. Has saved me countless hours of head scratching. I also use a power supply tester from Newegg on all power supplies, another aggravation saver.
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#25
Rusbel

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Another case of prevention being far better than a cure for sure. I will definitely test all new equipment in the future to avoid wasting mine and your time. I ran the other stick for about 7 hours and it came up with zero errors in 12 passes. Of course it doesn't really matter because PNY won't receive an RMA unless I send them both sticks since they are a pair. But that is of little concern to me, I have finally learned for good that I should be supporting the memory companies that I actually like.

one last big thanks! Peace!
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#26
rshaffer61

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The cost of memory has fallen to a all time low so replacing the one module should not be that bad now. :thumbsup:
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