Jump to content

Welcome to Geeks to Go - Register now for FREE

Geeks To Go is a helpful hub, where thousands of volunteer geeks quickly serve friendly answers and support. Check out the forums and get free advice from the experts. Register now to gain access to all of our features, it's FREE and only takes one minute. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more.

Create Account How it Works
Photo

Stuck in a never-ending boot loop


  • Please log in to reply

#1
Vette7

Vette7

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 34 posts
I've seem to have gotten myself in a bit of a pickle here. While updating my Windows 7 x64 a friend of mine recommended trying a program called "Driver Genius" to update the rest of my drivers. He claimed that it would install drivers that Windows Update could not. I decided to give it a shot, but I'm now very much regretting that decision. Here's what happens:

When I turn on my computer it goes through the usual process of displaying the BIOS screen, and then displays the "starting windows" screen with the animation of the glowing orbs turning into the Windows logo. After that, the computer reboots, and the cycle starts all over again. My first instinct is to give safe mode a shot. So I boot up the computer again, and tap F8 like a mad man, I get to the screen where I choose between repairing my computer, and the various safe mode options. I choose "safe mode with networking", the files load, the screen goes blank, and the computer restarts.

Help please on isle 6 :surrender:

Computer specs via Amazon.com
  • 0

Advertisements


#2
ranchhand3

ranchhand3

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 129 posts
Did you try "Last Known Good Configuration" and "System Restore"? This is what those tools are for. Tap F8 as it reboots, or maybe F4. Depends on your BIOS.

Edited by ranchhand3, 23 October 2012 - 06:12 PM.

  • 0

#3
Vette7

Vette7

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 34 posts
I did try "Last Known Good Configuration", and attempted system restore but it says that I have no restore points, although system restore was enabled at the time.
  • 0

#4
ranchhand3

ranchhand3

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 129 posts
Any program that messes with system files should always create a restore point automatically before doing its thing. Not to lecture you, but what probably has happened is that this junk software attempted to install the incorrect driver for something and it is causing a reboot because of driver conflict with the operating system as soon as it loads. We can hope that it simply is your MBR that is corrupted but in my experience it's deeper than that. Not to beat the subject to death, but my suggestion is to never, ever, ever, let ANY program "automatically" go out looking for "updated" drivers and install them. The same thing applied to these sleaze ads you see on the internet that will "clean" your register for you. Ok, lecture over. ;)

Perform a system repair from the Windows 7 installation disk; HERE is a link to a dependable website that will step you through it. A system repair from the OS disk replaces critical system files but does not overwrite your data and programs. I hope you have one. Have you been keeping image backups?
  • 0

#5
Vette7

Vette7

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 34 posts
That is solid advice. I also believe that doing a repair install would be my best option, at this point. Unfortunately, my HP computer was shipped with a "backup" partition rather than a physical Windows 7 installation DVD. Why on earth, I will never know. But I don't see that partition any more, I wonder if it has something to do with letting my boss install Ubuntu along side my Windows installation several weeks ago. My gut tells me to buckle down, and purchase a physical Windows 7 DVD, but at $99 a pop, I'm not sure I want to do that unless you think my remaining options look bleak.
  • 0

#6
Ztruker

Ztruker

    Member 5k

  • Technician
  • 7,091 posts
If you do not have a Windows 7 installation DVD, you can download a legal copy with SP1 integrated from here: Official Windows 7 SP1 ISO from Digital River.
Make sure you get the same version you have, Home Premium, Pro or Ultimate and 32 or 64 bit. Note that Basic or Starter is not available.

I recommend using ImgBurn at 4X speed (or the slowest available) to create the DVD from the downloaded .iso file.

You can do this on any computer capable of burning a DVD.

For techies or folks who work on computers: Create Windows 7 Universal ISO With All Editions Selection On Install with ei.cfg Removal Utility.
This will fit on a 6GB flash drive or can be burned to a DVD.
  • 0

#7
ranchhand3

ranchhand3

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 129 posts
Thanks ZTrucker, that is a valuable link! I will try it out myself. Is there one for Windows XP? I have clients all the time running XP that don't have a CD of their flavor of XP.
Vette7: Please post back when you are done and let us know how it went!

Edited by ranchhand3, 25 October 2012 - 02:46 PM.

  • 0

#8
Ztruker

Ztruker

    Member 5k

  • Technician
  • 7,091 posts
No, just Vista and Windows 7. Microsoft wants XP to go away, can't say as I blame them, it's geeting a bit old and clunky.
  • 0

#9
Vette7

Vette7

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 34 posts
After booting from the CD, and selecting "Upgrade" as the install option, it tells me to restart my computer, and let it start normally (not possible). I've tried using the "Repair your computer" options to no avail :confused:
  • 0

#10
Ztruker

Ztruker

    Member 5k

  • Technician
  • 7,091 posts
You can only do a Repair / Upgrade if you can boot the system normally. One of Microsoft's dumber choices in my opinion.

All you can do at this point is a normal install. It will create a Windows.old folder on your boot drive with all your stuff in it, including the operating system.
  • 0

#11
ranchhand3

ranchhand3

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 129 posts
Yes, unfortunately M/Soft strikes again. The XP version of system repair goes about it no matter what, I have used it dozens of times to get corrupted installations working again. As usual, M/Soft "improved" it so that it simply doesn't work half the time in Windows 7. I assume the "Repair" options you used did nothing. This is why a regular image backup is so important in Windows 7 and probably all versions going forward. If there is any data you would like to save to a separate drive before proceeding just for safety I can help you with that if you like.

Edited by ranchhand3, 27 October 2012 - 10:18 PM.

  • 0

#12
Vette7

Vette7

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 34 posts
What would be the easiest way for someone like me - having never done but maybe one image backup - to create, and archive backup images?

I think I'm going to go ahead with the fresh install. I'm fairly certain that moving my data to another partition will be okay. I remember doing it once before. Just to be safe though, I will back it up to my DVD-RWs.
  • 0

#13
ranchhand3

ranchhand3

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 129 posts
I was in your position about a year ago and did numerous tests of various programs out there, and finally settled on Macrium Reflect free edition. I set it up by using an extra 250gig hard drive installed in my box and dedicating it exclusively to image backups. I keep at least 4 backups and backup weekly. I have found it to be fast and a well laid out interface. With the first use it will urge you to create an emergency restore disk, so be sure to do it. One really nice thing is that if you enter your backup drive and click on any of the images saved there, MR will create a virtual partition with that image with your whole C: drive in Explore structure; you can drag and drop any program or data file onto your desktop and there it is from 4 months ago. So you are saving all your data files that are immediately accessible anytime as well as your entire drive if you want to totally reimage, with each image you make. Really nice.
The thing about backup utilities is that they all create a backup with no problem; many people don't test beyond that. The acid test is to re-image your drive in an emergency, that is where many fail miserably. For example, I purchased Acronis Trueimage 11 (in the past) and it made wonderful backups. The first time I had a major system crash with a corrupted partition and tried to re-image it wouldn't read its own images. Two days I sat in front of my computer trying to get Trueimage to work. I finally went to the Acronis website and found lots of others with the same problem, and no word from Acronis. They hid under the bed. And I have had that problem with other backup utilities also.
Whatever you decide to do, always dedicate a separate hard drive, either external or installed internally, for your backups. Never put your backups on the same HD that contains your operating system. If that drive fails mechanically you are up a creek without a paddle.
  • 0

#14
Ztruker

Ztruker

    Member 5k

  • Technician
  • 7,091 posts
Copying your data to another partition would do it but ranchhand3's suggestion of doing an image backup using Macrium Reflect is a great idea. That way you have access to everything that is currently on your boot drive.

Here are good tutorials: How to Do a Clean Installation with Windows 7

How to Do a Clean Install with an Upgrade Windows 7 Version
  • 0

#15
Vette7

Vette7

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 34 posts
Thank you both for your help. After doing a fresh install, I'm back in business, and with ranchhand3's advice, now making image backups. Lesson, learned.
  • 0






Similar Topics

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

As Featured On:

Microsoft Yahoo BBC MSN PC Magazine Washington Post HP