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Buying windows 7 for a new build.


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#1
exGopher

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Hey guys,
Gonna start off by saying that if this should be in the forums on Windows vista and 7, sorry about that.
So I'm building a new computer, have all the parts down and know what I'm getting, but I'm not entirely sure where I actually buy Windows 7.
I was looking at this on Amazon, but I got a bit worried because of the talk of OPKs and negative reviews saying that it stopped working after a month. Also, as far as I understand, the "system builder" version is only for companies intending to sell computers, and will not work for me. Am I correct in this?
Also, if that is true and is a problem, is there the same problem with this? It seems like the exact same product, but tigerdirect specifically directs you to it if you say you are building a computer.
Confused and would appreciate any help.
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#2
phillpower2

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:welcome: exGopher

Best explanation that I could find;

This is pretty clear-cut. Sadly, this language does not appear in the licensing for OEM versions of Windows 7. Yes, individuals can still buy OEM versions of Windows 7. But they cannot then install that copy of Windows 7 on a PC they are building for themselves. Instead, they can only install it on a PC that they then sell--and support--to someone else. And they must do so using Microsoft's OEM pre-installation kit (OPK), a step that is clearly aimed at further preventing this type of software from being used by the hobbyist market.


To simplify things for people I do not see why Microsoft do not have emblazoned on their packaging "The System Builder and The End User Cannot be one and the same person!

If you have any concerns you are better off with the full retail version basically.

One solution would be to build your own PC and have a local tech store install one of their OEM products, any other way such as having a friend build the computer, install the software and selling or giving the PC to you as a gift would not bare too well with Microsoft I`m afraid.
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#3
exGopher

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So what would be the cheapest way to get windows 7?
Would really prefer not to spend the 160$ that I'm seeing online on it, if it's possible to get cheaper.

Edited by exGopher, 25 December 2012 - 03:24 PM.

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#4
phillpower2

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Worth a look http://www.heidoc.ne...-download-links

Download tool http://www.microsoft..._usbdvd_dwnTool
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#5
Wolfeymole

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Also, as far as I understand, the "system builder" version is only for companies intending to sell computers, and will not work for me. Am I correct in this?


I have actually spoken to a Microsoft employee on this matter some time ago and he agreed that whether you are someone like Dell or an individual you are the system builder end of story.

Rather than "System Builder" disk I prefer to call such software an Unbranded OEM as that is what it basically is and you will have no problems in installing and running it.

Edited by Wolfeymole, 26 December 2012 - 03:18 AM.

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#6
rshaffer61

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I have never bought a retail copy of any OS I have installed. OEM's work the same as Retail except that you just don't get the fancy package and all the documentation. In my stack of software I have every OS from Dos to Windows 8 and everything was bought as OEM.
I can see no reason why you can't purchase the OEM version and it not work just like a retail version. The disks for all intensive purposes are the same. The major difference is once the OEM is installed on a system it is forever married or belongs to that system.
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#7
jcarissimo

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I think I know the answer to this already, but I know someone who has two Win Vista computers at home (laptop & tower). If they purchase one Win 7 OEM System Builder install - would he be able to activate both or would this not work? I'm just curious how it knows not to work properly if that is the case.
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#8
Wolfeymole

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In a nutshell Jcarrisimo, NO.

With any OEM it's a case of one box = one disk and that OEM is then tied to that system forever.

With a Retail version it is permissible to install the OS to another machine providing it has been removed from the original machine and all disk/s and paperwork are passed to the new owner.

This can only be done once.

Once either version is activated it sends a hardware profile to MS and in the case of an OEM if you try to install to another machine and activate, the hardware profile that MS has will not match.

A person even has to buy a new OEM for a system should the motherboard fail and be replaced as MS deem this scenario to be a new machine.

Quite mad really but there you go.
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#9
fyrfyter33

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...

A person even has to buy a new OEM for a system should the motherboard fail and be replaced as MS deem this scenario to be a new machine.

Quite mad really but there you go.


Actually, that part is incorrect. I have dealt with several motherboards that have croaked as well as replacing certain combinations of items in other desktops. If you get to the point that it will not take your Windows key to activate it, all you have to do is call Microsoft's 800 number, tell them what happened, they will have their automated system generate you a new key, and allow you to activate the system just as before. I am pretty sure they got tired of people complaining about what you have mentioned above. I have had to do this several times when custom & OEM parts have gone bad, and after the replacement parts are installed Windows will not activate. There is a certain combination and number of parts that have to be replaced for this to happen. I still have no idea of what has to be changed to trigger this. It seems to be hit and miss, and I have not found any listing as to what combinations will trigger this response from Windows.
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#10
Wolfeymole

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I stand corrected Fyrfyter as I should not have included the word Fail.

A new license must be acquired if the person simply fancies upgrading the motherboard to something better.

Here's the word from MS.

Q. Can a PC with an OEM Windows operating system have its motherboard upgraded and keep the same licence? What if it was replaced because it was defective?

A. Generally, an end user can upgrade or replace all of the hardware components on a computer—except the motherboard—and still retain the licence for the original Microsoft OEM operating system software. If the motherboard is upgraded or replaced for reasons other than a defect, then a new computer has been created. Microsoft OEM operating system software cannot be transferred to the new computer, and the licence of new operating system software is required. If the motherboard is replaced because it is defective, you do not need to acquire a new operating system license for the PC as long as the replacement motherboard is the same make/model or the same manufacturer's replacement/equivalent, as defined by the manufacturer's warranty.

The reason for this licensing rule primarily relates to the End User Software Licence Terms and the support of the software covered by those terms. The End User Software Licence Terms are a set of usage rights granted to the end user by the computer manufacturer, and relate only to rights for that software as installed on that particular computer. The system builder is required to support the software on the original PC. Understanding that end users, over time, upgrade their PCs with different components, Microsoft needed to have one base component "left standing" that would still define the original PC. Since the motherboard contains the CPU and is the "heart and soul" of the PC, when the motherboard is replaced (for reasons other than defect) a new PC is essentially created. The original system builder did not manufacture this new PC, and therefore cannot be expected to support it.


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#11
fyrfyter33

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The issue is you are unlikely to find a same brand & like model motherboard, if your original part croaks. Regardless of what MSFT has posted, their overseas customer service has always been good at providing new keys when parts & other components have broken or malfunctioned.
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#12
jcarissimo

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thank you all very much for your input. this is by far my favorite tech website!! everyone always very helpful and willing to give their much appreciated opinions.
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#13
phillpower2

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You are welcome :thumbsup:
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