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Got a gift PSU, don't know if it is good enough for my pc


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#1
PeanutCarl

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Well, hello, I got a new PSU for birthday, it is a Diablotek, I researched some about it and some people say it is awesome but other people say it will just harm your computer (in my case my future build) so I need your help people, as far as I see it is compatible with all my components, but I don't know about the quality http://pcpartpicker....-supply-psda600 it is that one or if you prefer the amazon link where it was bought here it is: http://www.amazon.co.../?tag=pcpapi-20 please tell me if it is good enough for my computer (the wattage is fine but I don't really know about quality)

Thanks, PeanutCarl.
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#2
iammykyl

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Hi PeanutCarl, Posted Image

Unfortunately, you have received a very bad quality PSU, No blame to the person who gave it to you as on paper/marketing, it looks quite good.

There are a lot of cheap brands, Diablotek being one, often made a little workshops in places like China to poor designs and little quality control.


It may not be possible to find a professional review of that exact model. I have never seen a good review for their products. /this is typical of the Diablotek branded PSUs. > http://www.hardocp.com/article/2010/12/17/diablotek_phd650_650w_power_supply_review/9 I advise not to use the unit. The PSU is the last part of the build to be selected and as everything else depends on it, should be of good quality from a trusted manufacturer like, Antec, Corsair.


If you are planning to build your own rig, Please seek advise on Geeks to Go. Have a look at what others have planned or built. We would be happy to help.
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#3
PeanutCarl

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Thanks again! I will ask for a refund so I can invest in one with better quality, I saw some Cool Master or Coolmax, something like that, they say 80+ certified, is that good? Its jsut a reference so I can search for a good PSU, because, as you say, everything depends on it. ;)

Edit: I have a PSU a little bit old, 475W, has worked fine, maybe I can use it meanwhile I get a new one?

Edited by PeanutCarl, 01 January 2013 - 05:33 PM.

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#4
iammykyl

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475W, has worked fine, maybe I can use it meanwhile I get a new one



Is it to be used on an existing system? if yes, please post the parts list. Before exchanging the Diablotek for a new one, please give us some idea of the type of computer it is to be used in, general use, gamer, home editing video/photo. There would be little point in getting a 500W when you end up needing a 650W. Also look to see if there is a re stocking fee, do you have to pay shipping? is it worth it to you?If possible, you exchange for a new DVD optical drive or use any credit towards a case.

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#5
PeanutCarl

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The system I used with the 475W psu is a bit old, nothing fancy it had 4gb RAM, a Gigabyte mobo, i3, PNY GeForce 9800 GT 1gb, 1Tb HDD, 500gb HDD, and the optical drive is an LG, I used it for moderate gaming, nothing that needed a fancy card such Minecraft, Starcraft, and World of Warcraft, mainly those games and some school work.
Also I have some parts ready to be built, I just needed to be sure about PSU:

CPU: i5-3470 Quad Core 3.2Ghz
Mobo: AS Rock LGA1155 Intel Z77 CrossFireX SATA3 USB3.0 A GbE ATX Motherboard Z77 PRO4
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 650 2048MB GDDR5 DVI mHDMI Graphics Card 02G-P4-2651-KR
RAM: Corsair Vengeance 8 GB ( 2 x 4 GB ) DDR3 1600 MHz (PC3 12800) 240-Pin DDR3 Memory Kit for Core i3, i5, i7 and Platforms SDRAM CMZ8GX3M2A1600C9
Case: GAMMA Classic Series ATX Mid Tower Interior Steel Chassis (Black)
Storage: I got a barracuda 1Tb HDD
Optical Drive: LG (it is from the old computer but works just fine)

Edited by PeanutCarl, 01 January 2013 - 06:49 PM.

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#6
iammykyl

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Great, thanks for the info.

Specs for a Ref, GTX 650 shows min PSU requirements of 400w, 20 amps on the 12v rail, one 6 pin PEG connector. > http://www.geforce.c.../specifications
I have used the PSU calculator > http://extreme.outer...n.com/PSUEngine and allowed for your parts list, plus
High end Desktop Mobo.
Mild over-clock the CPU.
a SSD drive.
Front bay memory card reader.
total fans. 3 x 120mm and 1 x 140mm. mouse and keyboard.
Result. Min, 378 W. Recommended 428 W

So given that your PSU is a bit old and would have Capacitor ageing, it should be OK, but, just to be on the safe side, please post the brand and model so we can double check.

Have you already purchased the video card?
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#7
PeanutCarl

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I don't know exactly the brand (it came with a computer I got from gift some years ago) but I sent it to a tech store at least 1 week ago and they said it will work fine if I don't go up to more than 450W, they also said it will run fine (I wasn't planning yo use it) for 5-7 months, maybe a bit more, then another PSU would be needed.

And yep, I already have the graphics card.
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#8
iammykyl

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With the PSU testing OK and having allowed for extra parts not yet installed, I can see no problem using that PSU. I was going to suggest, if you could find the funds, to fofor a GTX 660/660 ti.

Remember to turn of the power when working on the computer and take anti static measures, even when handling parts not already installed.
Check carefully that the stand offs on the Mobo mounting plate match exactly the pattern and number of screw hole in the motherboard, no extra ones.


Post back if you have any more questions or need help and we would appreciated the results of the build.

Good luck.
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#9
PeanutCarl

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Thanks so much! Just one more question, what exactly anti-static measures? like wearing rubber shoes or something like that?
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#10
iammykyl

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Just some info extracted from a blog.

"tís estimated that every year as much as a billion dollars of otherwise good computer equipment is destroyed by static electricity, also known as electrostatic discharge (ESD). Careful component handling and a few basic precautions can help assure that you donít contribute to the pile of destroyed hardware!

Components sensitive to ESD include mainboards, memory chips, PCI and AGP plug-in cards, and the bottoms of hard drives. Any time you see a circuit board, you should take precautions to protect the board from ESD.

Youíre familiar with static electricity. If youíve ever touched a door knob and gotten a shock or if youíve ever pulled a sweater over your head and saw your hair standing up like youíre in a horror movie, thatís static electricity. If youíve ever crawled into bed on a winter night and saw a spark, thatís static electricity."

So you need to take sensible measures to prevent any potentiating static you are carrying from discharging directly to computer parts.

with a PSU installed in the case. Connect to a switchable power outlet. Turn off the PSU, Turn off the the power outlet.

Before working on the computer and before handling parts not already installed, briefly touch a bare metal part of the computer case. You should also touch the case occasionallywhile doing you work.

Wearing insulated footwear may stop you picking up static from carpets etc, but not from static generated from your clothing when you squirm about in you seat.




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#11
PeanutCarl

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Thanks! I'll post the build when it is ready. ;)
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