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2 Networked PC's - One's Internet is Twice as Fast, Why?


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#1
Webslinger64

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I have two desktop PC's networked through a Comcast modem. When I run Internet speed tests for both PC's, one PC is twice as fast as the other. I'm curious as to why that is. Both PC's are quite old, but here is how they break down.

PC #1 is a Pentium D, CPU 3.00 GHz, 3.00 GHZ, 2.98 GB of RAM. OS is Windows XP Professional Version 2002 Service Pack 3
This PC regularly tests at 50-55 Mbps.

PC #2 is a Pentium 4, CUP 3.06 GHz, 3.07 GHz, 2.00 GB of RAM. OS is Windows XP Professional Version 2002 Service Pack 3
This PC regularly tests at 25-29 Mbps.

Can the speed difference be strictly attributed to the difference between the two (Pentium D vs. Pentium 4), or might there be other reasons for the difference that I am unaware of? Could it be the amount of RAM, type of RAM, or something else? Even though one is Pentium D vs. Pentium 4, can or should the P4 have a similar Internet speed to the Pentium D?

Thanks!
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#2
Webslinger64

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I sure could use some help here from a knowledgeable forum member or tech. Everything I've done so far has not worked and Comcast will only come out and do further troubleshooting for a $50.00 charge. Anyone???
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#3
Wolfeymole

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What speed do you get on PC 2 if PC 1 is disconnected from the modem Konakula?
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#4
Webslinger64

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What speed do you get on PC 2 if PC 1 is disconnected from the modem Konakula?


Thank you for the reply. Speed remains the same when I disconnect PC 1 from the modem. I've tried it both ways to see if there is a speed difference on either computer. I've disconnected PC 2 leaving PC 1 connected. Ran a speed test and the result was the same. Seems that not sharing the modem with both PC's, but only connecting one at a time does not translate into a faster Internet speed.
I've also switched ethernet/Internet cables to see if I might have had a bad cable on PC 2. The result was the same.
I have Firefox and Internet Explorer browsers on both PC's. Firefox is the default browser and has been for the past several years. I always found Internet Explorer to be too bloated and annoying. Firefox was faster at the time I switched. Interestingly enough, when I run the same speed test on Firefox and Internet Explorer, I get a faster speed (35 Mbps) on IE than I do on Firefox (25-26Mbps)for PC 2. Either way though, I still do not come close to the 55 Mbps speed of PC 1.
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#5
Wolfeymole

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Well all I can suggest mate is that it may be down to the network card or onboard NIC but even on 25 - 29 Mbps on PC2 that's still not a bad speed mate.
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#6
Webslinger64

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Well all I can suggest mate is that it may be down to the network card or onboard NIC but even on 25 - 29 Mbps on PC2 that's still not a bad speed mate.


25-29 Mbps is not bad, but I'm so anal about stuff like that the mystery in and of itself drives me nuts. Is there a way to test the network card for optimal performance to determine whether or not it is bad, and what is an onboard NIC?

Thanks.
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#7
Wolfeymole

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An integrated network interface card/socket on the motherboard similar to what you would find on a laptop.

I could understand if you had both machines going at once as you might experience bandwidth clogging but separately.... well who knows.

What do you use for your speed assessment?

I use Speedtest
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#8
Webslinger64

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An integrated network interface card/socket on the motherboard similar to what you would find on a laptop.

I could understand if you had both machines going at once as you might experience bandwidth clogging but separately.... well who knows.


I did a quick a check of both PC's via the Device Manager. Under the category 'Network Adapters' PC #1 has an Intel® PRO/100 VE Network Connection, PC #2 has both 1394 Net Adapter and Intel® 82566DC Gigabit Network Connection. Since PC #2 is a Pentium D vs. PC #1, which is a Pentium 4, could this be the reason for the speed difference? Might it just be a matter of adding a better Network Adapter card? I'm guessing the Intel® PRO/100 VE Network Connection on PC #1 is an onboard adapter, so I would need to add a Network Card to a PCI/AGP slot right?
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#9
Wolfeymole

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Well you could try a dedicated NIC card in a PCI slot mate but please don't try to put it in a AGP slot.

Unlike top end graphics cards network cards are cheap and cheerful.
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#10
Webslinger64

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Well you could try a dedicated NIC card in a PCI slot mate but please don't try to put it in a AGP slot.

Unlike top end graphics cards network cards are cheap and cheerful.


So basically a dedicated NIC card is an Ethernet card right? I would like to try installing a dedicated NIC card in a PCIslot, not AGP. Any suggestions or recommendations on how I would find a card that is compatible with my PC, or will any card that fits in my PC's PCI slot work?
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#11
Webslinger64

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As I'm thinking about the onboard network adapter on PC #1, it is a Intel® PRO/100 VE Network Connection, doesn't the PRO/100 portion mean it can handle up to 100 Mbps? If that's the case, than it should suffice right?
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#12
Wolfeymole

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Well PC1 is fine wouldn't you agree, no problems there whatsoever.

Something like this might be ideal for your needs.

http://www.amazon.co...5524595&sr=1-52
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#13
Webslinger64

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Well PC1 is fine wouldn't you agree, no problems there whatsoever.

Something like this might be ideal for your needs.

http://www.amazon.co...5524595&sr=1-52


That looks good to me. Thank you for the help.
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#14
Wolfeymole

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You're welcome mate. :thumbsup:
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