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Computer won't power on (at all) after chkdsk /r


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#1
Magden

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My computer was running very slow (lagging whatever it was doing) all of a sudden last night, and this wouldn't get fixed even after restarting it a few times. So I decided to run a chkdsk /r upon reboot (read online this might help) and I restarted the computer. It started the disk check and I left. When I got back, the computer was off, and now it won't start. Nothing at all starts when I push the on button. I changed the power cable, made sure the computer is getting power, and that's not it. Before I try and check the power supply or open the computer, is there anything that might explain a computer suddenly running very slow, the ''dying'' in the middle of a chkdsk /r? (To specify: It doesn't start at all. The blue ''on / thinking'' light will turn on for a brief moment once after the computer is unplugged and re-plugged, but no fan comes on and there is no noise at all from the computer.) I was thinking this might be a problem with the C drive or the motherboard?

Thanks in advance!
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#2
phillpower2

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:welcome: Magden

Please provide information about your computer, this includes is it a notebook or desktop, is it a custom build or brand name such as Dell or HP, if it is provide the model name or series number (not serial) providing these details will enable us to better assist you.

made sure the computer is getting power, and that's not it.

Can you tell us how this was established.

Had the computer been moved or knocked just before the issue occurred.
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#3
Magden

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It's an Acer, model Aspire X1700. (Desktop) The power supply MODEL NO: PS - 5221 - 06 : A1 : ROHS.

'' ''made sure the computer is getting power, and that's not it.''

Can you tell us how this was established.''

By this I meant it wasn't anything obvious like my a bad wall socket or a turned-off power bar. The computer was receiving power from it's cable. Nobody was close to the computer since the time I left and it was ok to when I returned and it was dead. No power outage.

I've disconnected and removed the entire psu from the desktop. Did not try another psu since I didn't want to buy a new one until I figure out the problem and don't have access to a used one.

I tried to connect the green cable in the 20-cable motherboard adaptor with the adjacent black ones using a paper clip. When I plugged the psu directly into the wall, its fan did not come on. (My psu doesn't have an on-off switch on it, it's an older computer.) When trying this, the psu wasn't connected to anything else in the computer. I was led to believe online that this would confirm that my psu is no longer functional. Is that certain?

Thank you!
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#4
phillpower2

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Thanks for the additional information :thumbsup:

From the details that we now have it would seem that the PSU has expired, this is a well documented problem with the X1700 power supply, to make matters worse it is a propriety PSU and you cannot obtain them as readily as generic ATX PSUs, the least expensive that I could find in the USA http://www.supernote...?psupart=458701

Some information to help with a basic PSU test, this is as much as the average user can do;

http://www.smpspower...rs-pinouts.html



The PSU in the X1700 only has 220W output which is possibly why it fails so often.
Can I ask whether you have ever fitted an add on video card or are you still using the onboard video chip.
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#5
Magden

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Thank you,

It's using the onboard video chip. The computer was never modified or opened until now.

By the way, I was still wondering if there might be another problem with the computer because of the horrible system-wide lag I experienced before the pcu failure... Could the failing power supply have caused that? I guess I won't know until I try a new power supply. xD

And finally, since I won't be using the computer for more than several months (I'll be building a new one), could I get a cheap pcu (used or new)that obviously won't fit in the small case and leave it hanging out of the case (I wouldn't be able to put the side panel back on the case)? I haven't found any information on leaving a computer case open for an extended period of time.

I was thinking of getting something cheap and local like this: http://www.staples.c...85_2-CA_1_20001

Or an even cheaper one used from a local computer shop.

Otherwise, I could have access to a used psu (the same model) from an trusted Acer parts store (not Acer): http://www.acerparts...CFcIv4AodlnsAmA

=)
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#6
phillpower2

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By the way, I was still wondering if there might be another problem with the computer because of the horrible system-wide lag I experienced before the pcu failure... Could the failing power supply have caused that?


As a PSU puts out various voltages +3.3V, +5V and +12V it may appear that the PSU is working correctly but it is not, any significant drop of any output can prevent the system from booting up, the other scenario is a significant increase in the output which can be worse as it can fry one or more major components such as the MB, CPU, Ram, add on video card etc.

Please be aware that there are no user replaceable parts in a PSU so a bad one should be disposed of in a responsible manner and any type of conclusive testing will need to be done by a suitably trained Tech who has the required testing equipment and the relevant knowledge as to how to use it.

And finally, since I won't be using the computer for more than several months (I'll be building a new one), could I get a cheap pcu (used or new)that obviously won't fit in the small case and leave it hanging out of the case

I would in now way recommend this, not only would your hardware be at risk of damage but also a more serious risk of electrocution to yourself and others.

If you intend building a new computer in the future you would be far better (and safer) to purchase a good case and PSU first and transfer your present hardware into the new case, this will allow you to at least use the computer while you save for/purchase the other new parts.

Did you use the information that I provided to test the present PSU and if so what was the outcome.

Have you tried an alternative PSU power cord.

You are welcome BTW :thumbsup:
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#7
Magden

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I did try a different power cable (the one from the monitor), and it didn't work. I also tried the paper clip test, but tested without a secondary fan attached. The in-built fan never turned. I will purchase a psu and see if that fixes the problem.

Thanks
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#8
phillpower2

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Before purchasing a new PSU I suggest that you have the present one tested by a tech, many stores will do this for free in the hope that you make a purchase from them.

I will purchase a psu and see if that fixes the problem.

What type of PSU do you intend purchasing.

You can get a good case with a quality PSU already fitted for a reasonable price, an example http://us.ncix.com/p...nufacture=Antec
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#9
Magden

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I'll get mine tested and if is isn't working, then I'll get another one, in the hopes that the psu is the only issue... I'll either get a used version or the same model or I'll get a case + psu with around 300W (I think it doesn't matter what the W is as long as it's over 220W?), and the correct 4 cables (with the right voltages).

=)
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#10
phillpower2

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If you are planning on upgrading soon in any event then I would wait until you are able to purchase the case that you want and a good quality PSU, this will save you funds.

NB: Unless you plan on having a top of the range video card and multiple HDDs a quality brand 500W PSU such as Antec, Corsair, OCZ or Seasonic should not need replacing when you upgrade.
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#11
Magden

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Update (if you are still following this phillpower2 ;)

I recently had access to a used power supply that is functional. It did not work (same problem as with old psu). So, I pulled the video card, the wireless network card, etc. And the computer powers on, either with the new psu or the old one. The psu fan and the led light (on the front) both turn on and the computer is definitely on if the video card is completely removed. It does not power on at all (like before) when the video card is reinstalled.

(If I plug in the monitor connector that doesn't attach to the video card itself I can see stuff appear on screen - what parts the computer can detect, etc. I can enter setup, but haven't...)

I'm assuming this means either the video card is defective or the motherboard is defective where is connects to the video card. Any way to check that, or would I need another video card to test?

This totally explains the mystery of the horrible lag I had before the computer died!

Thanks again,

=)

Edited by Magden, 11 June 2013 - 03:06 PM.

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#12
phillpower2

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Sorry but I`m confused :unsure:

From my reply #4

Can I ask whether you have ever fitted an add on video card or are you still using the onboard video chip.

From your reply #5

It's using the onboard video chip. The computer was never modified or opened until now.


However you have now said;

So, I pulled the video card


What are the brand and model name or number of the spare PSU that you have tried.
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#13
Magden

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Until opening this thread, I had never opened my computer. I meant to say that the video card used in the computer was the same one that had come with the computer when I bought it. GeForce G100 512MB DDR2 V/D/HDMI - I have now opened up my computer and have been fiddling around in it, unplugging and replugging stuff to try and fix it.

The alternate psu I used is: Arctic Power Supply, Model No. ARPS-480, with 480W combined wattage.

When I tried the alternate psu, the computer did the exact same thing as with the original psu. I assumed my psu was not to blame. Following advice I got online on a website, I disconnected everything from the motherboard except for the RAM and the processor. When I powered, the computer turned on. On the computer screen, it brings me to a black screen with white text that allows me to enter setup. (This is without the video card installed. And I can do this with either of the two power supply units, the old or new one.)

Since putting the video card back into the motherboard seems to prevent it from starting (no beeps, nothing, the original problem), I assume it's either the video card or the motherboard in where it connects to the video card... The video card might have overheated or something? From this I'm assuming I should get a new video card (and thus a new tower, since generic video cards won't fit in my thin tower).

Basically, removing the video card allows the motherboard to "post" and beep and load to a basic setup screen. Replacing the video card into it's slot prevents this startup.

Also, a side question... In getting a new tower and video card (if I do), is there any way to be sure that the motherboard and everything else from this brand name, smaller model, computer will fit into another tower? As in, will the USB, sound, video in/out connectors at the back of the motherboard line up to the appropriate holes in the new tower? No part in this computer is generic, everything is modified to fit into a smaller tower...

Thank you in advance!

=)

Edited by Magden, 11 June 2013 - 06:14 PM.

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#14
phillpower2

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Thanks for clarifying :thumbsup:

It does appear to be the video card that has expired but you are correct in that it could also be the slot.
If you are unable to borrow a card for testing purposes have a tech store test the present one, many will do this free of charge or for a small fee in the hope of making a sale if your card proves to be bad.

If you replace your case make sure that the replacement case will accommodate the format of your MB as in mATX, ATX etc, you should also be able to reuse the present I/O (MB backplate) in the new case so that your rear ports are compatible/aligned.
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#15
Magden

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Just to conclude this thread... Installing a new graphics card has solved the issue. (The graphics card having a short was the only problem with the computer... Upon startup, the psu was detecting the short in the graphics card and shutting down automatically. This definitely explains the computer's behaviour prior to the failure - the horrible system-wide lag.) The computer is up and running!

Thanks for all your help phillpower2!
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