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Getting "Strike f1 to retry boot" message


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#1
screen_name2

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I'm running Windows 7 on a DELL XPS.

Before this happened a disk scan was running and I reset the computer before it was finished. It restarted the first time, but by the time I got back to the computer it was on the "Strike f1 to retry boot" screen.

I've tried turning on CAPS LOCK, NUM LOCK & SCROLL LOCK and hitting ALT -E,F,B, but that did not seem to work. I don't know if I did the combination work or something, but I tried a variety of combos and none of them seemed to work.

I also tried reloading the default settings in the Boot options menu and that did not seem to help either. I've read resetting the BIOS is a possible solution, but I'm not sure what the next step is at this point.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

* UPDATE: I just ran a diagnostics test and it said Error Code 0141 - No Drive Detected

Edited by screen_name2, 28 May 2013 - 11:17 AM.

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#2
Wolfeymole

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This sounds like some hard drive problems mate.

Go back into the bios and tell us if the hard drive is listed please.
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#3
screen_name2

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Hey Wolfey, thanks for the reply.

If I go under F12 Boot Options, it shows CD/DVD as the first option, then it has Boot To Utility Partition as the second option, Diagnostics as the third option and <Enter Set-Up> as the fourth

If I go under Enter Set-Up, under Boot Configurations > Boot device Priorities, it has Hard Drive as the first option, then CD/DVD as the second. They both are in parenthesis and on the side bar it says "A device enclosed in parenthesis has been disabled in the corresponding type menu"
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#4
Wolfeymole

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No what I meant was is to tell us if the hard drive is listed in the main bios screen.

This is done by continually tapping F2 immediately on boot up.

This an example.

Posted Image
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#5
screen_name2

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I don't see it being recognized anywhere on there.

Under SATA0 it has [ATADI CDROM] listed
Then under SATA1-4 and eSATA it says [NOT DETECTED]

I didn't see the hard drive listed anywhere under System Info either.

In the manual it says you can use the "Dell DataSafe Local Backup to restore your hard drive to the operating state it was in when you purchased your computer, while preserving the data files." Would running that help with this issue, or is that an entirely different manner?

I also found a Drivers & Utilities disc, along with a Drivers & Documentations disc - would running either one of those help?

Edited by screen_name2, 29 May 2013 - 05:59 AM.

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#6
Wolfeymole

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I would suggest that because the hard drive is missing from the list that it is in fact dead.

The cd disks that you mention would be of no use without a working hard drive and operating system.
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#7
screen_name2

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Gotcha. I'm going to renew my warranty and get a new hard drive put in. I'll try the slave drive route or an external enclosure to get the data off the old hard drive and hopefully that puts everything back to normal.

But thanks again for your help. I really appreciate it.
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#8
Wolfeymole

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You're more than welcome mate but I wouldn't hold your breath on getting any information off the drive if it is truly dead in the water.

Please let us know how you go on. :thumbsup:
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#9
screen_name2

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I spoke to DELL support today and they said they would send a tech who would take the hard drive with him, so I would have to get any of the data off the hard drive myself before he comes.

Do you think I should try the slave drive route or go with the external enclosure, and if so, what kind of external enclosure should I purchase?

Thanks again for the help and advice - I really appreciate it.
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#10
Wolfeymole

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If you have another desktop pc that you can attach this drive to internally then that would save money to be honest mate.

However with SATA drives they cannot be truly regarded as Slave drives as it was when PATA/IDE drives were prevalent.

Attach it to a spare SATA socket, where it will not be regarded as a primary boot drive and see if you can retrieve your stuff from it to the Primary drive.
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#11
phillpower2

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If I may make a suggestion to try and secure the data folks :)


===================
***Required Hardware***
CD Burner (CDRW) Drive,
Blank CD,
Extra Storage Device (USB Flash Drive, External Hard Drive)

===================

1. Save these files to your Desktop/Burn Your Live CD:
  • Download Latest Puppy Linux ISO (i.e.: lupu-520.iso)
    Download BurnCDCC ISO Burning Software

  • Open BurnCDCC with Windows Explorer
  • Extract All files to a location you can remember
  • Double Click Posted Image BurnCDCC
  • Click Browse Posted Image and navigate to the Puppy Linux ISO file you just downloaded
  • Open/Double Click that file
    IMPORTANT: Adjust the speed bar to CD: 4x DVD: 1x
  • Click Start Posted Image
  • Your CD Burner Tray will open automatically
  • Insert a blank CD and close the tray
  • Click OK
Puppy Linux Live CD will now be created
2. Set your boot priority in the BIOS to CD-ROM first, Hard Drive Second
  • Start the computer/press the power button
  • Immediately start tapping the appropriate key to enter the BIOS, aka "Setup"
    (Usually shown during the "Dell" screen, or "Gateway" Screen)
  • Once in the BIOS, under Advanced BIOS Options change boot priority to:
    CD-ROM 1st, Hard Drive 2nd
  • Open your ROM drive and insert the disk
  • Press F10 to save and exit
  • Agree with "Y" to continue
  • Your computer will restart and boot from the Puppy Linux Live CD

    Posted Image

3. Recover Your Data
  • Once Puppy Linux has loaded, it is actually running in your computer's Memory (RAM). You will see a fully functioning Graphical User Interface similar to what you normally call "your computer". Internet access may or may not be available depending on your machine, so it is recommended you print these instructions before beginning. Also, double clicking is not needed in Puppy. To expand, or open folders/icons, just click once. Puppy is very light on resources, so you will quickly notice it is much speedier than you are used to. This is normal. Ready? Let's get started.

    3a. Mount Drives[list]
  • Click the Mount Icon located at the top left of your desktop. Posted Image
  • A Window will open. By default, the "drive" tab will be forward/highlighted. Click on Mount for your hard drive.
  • Assuming you only have one hard drive and/or partition, there may be only one selection to mount.
  • USB Flash Drives usually automatically mount upon boot, but click the "usbdrv" tab and make sure it is mounted.
  • If using an external hard drive for the data recovery, do this under the "drive" tab. Mount it now.
3b. Transfer Files.
  • At the bottom left of your desktop a list of all hard drives/partitions, USB Drives, and Optical Drives are listed with a familiar looking hard drive icon.
  • Open your old hard drive i.e. sda1
  • Next, open your USB Flash Drive or External Drive. i.e. sdc or sdb1
  • If you open the wrong drive, simply X out at the top right corner of the window that opens. (Just like in Windows)
  • From your old hard drive, drag and drop whatever files/folders you wish to transfer to your USB Drive's Window.
For The Novice: The common path to your pictures, music, video, and documents folders is: Documents and Settings >> All Users (or each idividual name of each user. CHECK All Names!) >> Documents >> You will now see My Music, My Pictures, and My Videos.

Remember to only click once! No double clicking! Once you drag and drop your first folder, you will notice a small menu will appear giving you the option to move or copy. Choose COPY each time you drag and drop.

YOU ARE DONE!!! Simply click Menu >> Mouse Over Shutdown >> Reboot/Turn Off Computer. Be sure to plug your USB Drive into another working windows machine to verify all data is there and transferred without corruption. Congratulations!

Note that there might be some other Puppy distros on the page (such as Slacko Puppy), but you need Lucid Puppy (lupu), the Ubuntu-based one. Always make sure you start downloading a file that starts with "lupu"!
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#12
screen_name2

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Hey Phil. Thanks for the tutorial. The Puppy Linux worked as far as booting up, but unfortunately my old hard drive did not show up. The external drive and the CD did, but not the old hard drive.

Does this mean it is dead in the water? And should I bother even trying the slave drive or external enclosure at this point, or am I basically done here as far as extracting the old data?

Open to any suggestions as to how to recover the old data.
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#13
Wolfeymole

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You could try professional recovery mate at eye watering prices or just put it down to experience.

To my mind the drive is FUBAR, an acronym for F****D Up Beyond All Recognition.
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#14
phillpower2

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Hi screen_name2

It does not look good for the drive at the moment I`m afraid, I would suggest though that you try swapping SATA cables and ports on the MB before you do anything else.

BTW Wolfey is correct about the cost of data recovery services so be on your guard if you go down that route.
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#15
screen_name2

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Yeah, I looked up those data recovery prices and they are pretty brutal. I have 99% of the data on there backed up, so I think I'll just sacrifice the 1% and be thankful I have 99% of it still in hand.

Do you think it is safe to pronounce this hard drive as dead, or should I keep trying? They said the tech guy is going to take it with him, so I have to do any data recovery beforehand.
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