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Thermal Event. Thermal paste replaced, still unsolved


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#31
chromejael

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Ok, I will attempt to make the backup image first.

It is very likely that my PC will auto-shutdown while its burning the DVD image. Should I try and get my PSU tested at a tech store first? or just proceed with the image backup?

When I do physically unscrew and remove my PSU and bring it to the tech store, what do I do, and what are the possible conclusions he could come to? Is it possible for the tech guy to actually "fix" my PSU then and there and get it back in shape?
My apologies for the multitude of questions :)
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#32
phillpower2

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I personally would have the PSU tested first as the damage that one can cause if it pops is often irreparable, please see my canned text below;

As a PSU puts out various voltages +3.3V, +5V and +12V it may appear that the PSU is working correctly but it is not, any significant drop of any output can prevent the system from booting up, the other scenario is a significant increase in the output which can be worse as it can fry one or more major components such as the MB, CPU, Ram, add on video card etc.

Please be aware that there are no user replaceable parts in a PSU so a bad one should be disposed of in a responsible manner and any type of conclusive testing will need to be done by a suitably trained Tech who has the required testing equipment and the relevant knowledge as to how to use it.

PSU testing equipment

No need to apologize for asking questions as it is the sensible approach - ask as many questions as you feel that you need to :thumbsup:
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#33
chromejael

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Ok, I've found several shops selling computer equipment and parts, that can check my PSU, free of charge.
Since their business IS about selling parts, I fear they might give me false results just to make me buy a new PSU from them.

Is it an overnight job, or can they test it right there in front of me?

If they do test it then and there, since they have all the equipment, is there any particular piece of information you'd like me write down?
Is there anything specific that I should ask them to check for?
You can just write the full technical jargon here, and the proper measurement units, if there are any. I'll just use my Iphone and ask him word-for-word.
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#34
phillpower2

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You should find out how reputable a business is before going there, if you cannot do this through the recommendations of other people check out their advertising for possible customer feedback + check how long that the business has been trading as a long standing established store will have a proven track record.

I cannot tell you what the working arrangements of any store will be, the test itself does not take long but but take into consideration the stores already existing work schedule, ask the store this question before leaving the PSU with them.

No technical jargon to ask them as the test should be exactly as in the video I previously provided, under no circumstances trust a store that only uses a multi meter to test the PSU as the results cannot be relied upon as the PSU is not under load.
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#35
chromejael

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So, to properly test it, they need to have a multimeter and other measuring devices. Ok, got it.

If its like in the video you showed me, is it highly possible that my PSU will be completely fried by the end of the test? Should I expect it to be completely dead by the end of testing?
Because it sounds to me like this test can only go two ways, either it's perfectly fine, or the store will experience a blackout. Is this right?
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#36
phillpower2

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So, to properly test it, they need to have a multimeter and other measuring devices. Ok, got it.

Sorry but no, my previous reply actually did say:

under no circumstances trust a store that only uses a multi meter to test the PSU as the results cannot be relied upon as the PSU is not under load.

They need to use a device such as the one at the attached link which again is only an example http://www.cinepower...gear/bench.html

The previous link that I provided was only an example to show you the equipment that is required to conclusively test a PSU and in no way suggesting that your PSU will ultimately end up in smoke, your PSU will only be connected up and readings taken to see if it is behaving as it should as in putting out the correct voltages.
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#37
chromejael

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Ok, I took my PSU to the PC shop, and they said they could help me out for free.

First, he hooked up the main power cable of the PSU to his own PC motherboard, and the power cable on the opposite end of the PSU, then he just booted up his PC. The he showed me the readings, saying there's nothing wrong with it.

I asked him if he could do more in-depth tests. He said it would take a few hours. So I left the PSU with him, and came back a few hours later.

When I asked him what was the results, he said there was nothing wrong with it. I asked him what kind of test did he do, he said he hooked it up to a PC, surfed the internet a bit, and it didn't shut down or anything.

I do believe him when he said there was nothing wrong with it, but only because I don't believe he really tested the PSU properly, as in he didn't use multimeters or any form of measuring device. I believe he came to the conclusion simply by hooking it up to his PC. Whether or not if he did push the PSU to its limit, that I'm not sure of.

What do I make of this result?
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#38
phillpower2

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When I asked him what was the results, he said there was nothing wrong with it. I asked him what kind of test did he do, he said he hooked it up to a PC, surfed the internet a bit, and it didn't shut down or anything.

Next to letting the computer sit there idle surfing the internet is about as stressful on a PSU as it is if you download an update, streaming videos, playing demanding video games or doing a Furmark burn in test should have been the minimum of tests, the crux of it is the store does not have the required equipment, try a burn in test yourself and see what happens http://www.ozone3d.net/benchmarks/fur/ this will stress test your video card and PSU - run it for no longer than 15 - 20 minutes if the computer does not shut down first.
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#39
chromejael

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I installed FurMark, and received this message when I tried to run a "Burn In test":

"FurMark requires an OpenGL 2.0 compliant graphics controller. Startup failed.
NVIDIA Geforce6 and higher (with the latest Forceware drivers) or ATI Radeon X1000 and higher (with the latest Catalyst drivers) are good choice!"
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#40
phillpower2

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Try http://www.technibbl...ry-stress-test/
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#41
chromejael

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That Furmark software, even if I did update to the latest drivers, it still won't work because my actual Graphics card is too old, right?

The "Video Memory Stress Test" software, do I just run it until the test ends, that is if my PC doesn't shut down first?
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#42
phillpower2

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That Furmark software, even if I did update to the latest drivers, it still won't work because my actual Graphics card is too old, right?
Correct.

The "Video Memory Stress Test" software, do I just run it until the test ends, that is if my PC doesn't shut down first?
Also correct chromejael :thumbsup:


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#43
chromejael

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I ran the test twice, to full completion. After the 1st test, I did a voluntary restart, and ran another test.
No auto-shutdowns occured. The PC was on for about 100 minutes, no problems.
What do I make of this result?

Edited by chromejael, 06 July 2013 - 04:05 AM.

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#44
phillpower2

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I ran the test twice, to full completion. After the 1st test, I did a voluntary restart, and ran another test.

Did both tests pass with no errors.

No auto-shutdowns occured. The PC was on for about 100 minutes, no problems.
What do I make of this result?

Honest answer is I`m not sure, can I ask what PSU you are presently using and what hardware devices were connected to the PSU when you ran the tests.
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#45
chromejael

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Yes, there seemed to be no errors. Here are the screenshots of the results:

1st run - http://bayimg.com/hanbJaAek
2nd run - http://bayimg.com/HAnBKaAEk

I am still using the same hardware as I have been using. The PSU is the same ICute PSU, all DVD drives and floppy drives were disconnected, and only 1 HDD was connected; the HDD containing the OS.
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