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Will this processor work nice


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#16
Brazened

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Good PSUs have extra protections within the circuitry for power surges, brownouts and blackouts. The cheapies won't have those. My Seasonic protected my system one time during a storm. It powered off quick. Made me think I blew my PC but it was the protection doing the job. Whew. :)

Oh yeah, well regulated power flow too.

Edited by Brazened, 17 September 2013 - 09:02 PM.

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#17
iammykyl

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Gday.
Thanks for your update.

I found the the After Effects CS6 requirements


That's the min posted on Adobe. That will just about get the application crawling along, .

I like the 80 Plus Gold Certified models that are energy efficient. I found one for about $40


Looks like Rosewill maybe the king based on lots of ratings, and Seasonic has many high ratings also, although some of theirs are rated a little below at "4 star"
Post a link so we know which one.
***
Some of the Rosewill are actually pretty good.

Intel Core i7-4770S @ 3.10GHz Thermal Design Power: 65W (I wonder why this one uses less power?)


Mainly because the base frequency is 3.1. Good use would be in a server, saving on power bills but still able to perform when under a heavy load. This site for info and making general comparisons, > http://www.cpu-world...e i7-4770S.html

I'll be buying maybe a 20" LCD screen, so the graphics will need to support that size of screen.


The actual size of the screen is not the important factor, it is the resolution, (number of pixels/complexity) the GPU has to process. You will have now problems on a 20" monitor at it's native resolution.

If you are in the USA? Can you reasonable get to one of these stores. > http://www.microcent...es/default.aspx
Will spec a build later for you to consider.





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#18
coguy321

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Thanks for the info.

Here are some power supply ratings:
Power Supply

I haven't fully decided on one yet because I don't know what the minimum wattage I need.

My LCD screen will probably be a 20" size and 1600 x 900 in Resolution.

Yeah, but I'll probably order from online and have it shipped.

Thanks again.
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#19
iammykyl

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Gday.
A first draft build for you to consider. Please note that the CPU price is "pick up only".
> http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1F53S

There is a further saving on the CPU Motherboard/Z87-G41 PC Mate bundle, again "pick up only"
> http://www.microcent...or-bundles.aspx
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#20
Brazened

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Some of the Rosewill PSUs is made by Super Flower which is a well regarded maker. Give us the model you're looking at and I'll tell you who makes it.

Edited by Brazened, 18 September 2013 - 09:25 AM.

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#21
coguy321

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Thanks both of you, and that site iammykyl is very nice. Thanks
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#22
coguy321

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Here is what I came up with things I like, what do you all think?
Parts

I know it's possible to put the windows operating system on the SSD separate from programs etc. on the HDD, so I might do that, or I might not. The benefit as many of you likely know is you can wipe clean the SDD if windows gets errors in the future and start all over fresh by re-installing windows, while keeping information on the HDD safe.

Edited by coguy321, 19 September 2013 - 04:42 PM.

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#23
Brazened

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Not a bad list but I don't know if the PSU have enough power for this system. You might want to up it to around 500 watts. Mine's a 520 watts Seasoinic.

By the way this is the system I put together for myself. I did a lot of research on components and hand picked the good stuff.

(From Speccy)

Summary
Operating System
Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit SP1
CPU
Intel Core i3 2105 @ 3.10GHz 41 °C
Sandy Bridge 32nm Technology
RAM
8.00 GB Dual-Channel DDR3 @ 665MHz (9-9-9-24) 2x4 Corsair Vengeance 1600
Motherboard
Gigabyte Technology Co., Ltd. B75M-HD3 (Intel Core i3-2105 CPU @ 3.10GHz) 28 °C
Graphics
ASUS VS239 (1920x1080@60Hz) Monitor
AMD Radeon HD 6670 (Sapphire/PCPartner) PCIe card
Hard Drives
932GB Seagate ST1000NM0011 ATA Device (SATA) 31 °C Seagate Constellation Server Drive
Optical Drives
ASUS DRW-24B1ST c ATA Device
Audio
SB Audigy (My old PCI sound card)

PSU is Seasonic M12II 520 Bronze modular.

At the time it was around $800 not counting the monitor which is $180 for it. First I built a Celeron system to run while I bought the parts month by month taking advantage of sales and discounts from Newegg. I saved $180 including the cube case (Xigmatek Gigas) for less than half price.

Edited by Brazened, 19 September 2013 - 07:02 PM.

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#24
coguy321

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Thanks for the info, I think from doing some calculations it should not use use over 300 W, it will likely be closer to 290 W or less most of the time.

Estimated Wattage from the pcpartpicker site: 173W

Using this calculator: http://images10.newe...l/tool/psucalc/
It give about 288W on an almost identical system (this site probably over estimates it some on purpose so there will be enough wattage).
So I'm thinking it should be ok with a 350W PSU.

Edited by coguy321, 19 September 2013 - 08:21 PM.

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#25
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Ok, you did well with that but the important thing is the 12V rail and the amperage. 12V is part of the equation giving the total wattage of said PSU. You'd want to have enough amps on the 12V rail as most components runs on 12V. Figure the wattage of the components and check it against the wattage of the 12V rail. Look up your PSU and find a pic of the sticker on the PSU for the info on the 12V rail.

Also you don't want to make the PSU run at its max rating just because it's right for it. You'd want it to cruise and handle power up when it's called for. Go for the higher wattage than your system needs but don't overdo it like twice the wattage as they draw power from the wall.
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#26
coguy321

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Here is the label:

http://imageshack.us...02/613/a7ht.jpg

Just for info, I read a past post that said it's best to be between 20% and 80% of the maximum rating to be at the most efficient power usage.
So for a 350W PSU it's 70W to 280W for most efficient power usage if that was right.

You might have to expand a bit on the rail part, I'm not familiar with that.

Thanks.

Edited by coguy321, 19 September 2013 - 09:19 PM.

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#27
Brazened

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You're good to go. :)
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#28
coguy321

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Good to hear, thanks for all the info and help.
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#29
iammykyl

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PSU. Gets good review, but I would not use it in a Desktop as it is a Server unit. You will be unable to do any kind of cable management, it does not have a power switch, It does not have any PCI-e connections so if you install a GPU later you will have to use adapters, under load with the 30mm fan it will be noisy,
> http://www.xbitlabs....-enhance_2.html
> http://www.jonnyguru...=Story&reid=277
you would be much better off with the Rosewill Capstone, 5 years warranty, $59
Review, > http://www.anandtech...w-80plus-gold/6
Newegg, > http://www.newegg.co...ID=3938566&SID=

RAM. You have selected two separate sticks where you should be selecting two sticks as a kit. A kit is guaranteed to be compatible, two separate sticks are not guaranteed compatible, some Motherboards are very picky and the RAM must match 100%, better safe than sorry later.

Case, comes with only a top fan and a rear fan fitted, rest are optical.
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#30
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That's a server PSU? Sorry, won't fit your case. My mistake for not checking it. :whistling:

By the way, the Rosewill Capstone series is made by Super Flower so it's good stuff.

Edited by Brazened, 20 September 2013 - 09:50 AM.

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