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protection from power surges


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#1
00pm

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Hi everyone.

Mainly I want to protect my notebook but also
some other electronics with batteries.I would buy
a socket with surge protection but read that those
are effective against high voltage but not against
low voltage.So is there a cheap way to protect
against both high and low voltage?

Edited by 00pm, 25 September 2013 - 01:32 AM.

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#2
Down_with_malware

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Hello there! I came across this, is this something you where looking for?

http://www.ebay.com/...=item25795aab82

I don't know anything about this user though, just a heads up. I couldn't really find anything like what you

where looking for; until I came across that. What are you most concerned about? Lightning strikes? Or just

something else?

Edited by Down_with_malware, 25 September 2013 - 02:04 AM.

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#3
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Hello there! I came across this, is this something you where looking for?

http://www.ebay.com/...=item25795aab82

I don't know anything about this user though, just a heads up. I couldn't really find anything like what you

where looking for; until I came across that. What are you most concerned about? Lightning strikes? Or just

something else?


I need sth like this but I need sth I can use out of the box. I consider an UPS if I cant find sth cheaper
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#4
westom

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Mainly I want to protect my notebook but also some other electronics with batteries.I would buy a socket with surge protection but read that those are effective against high voltage but not against low voltage.So is there a cheap way to protect against both high and low voltage?

Why do you know low voltage is destructive? Hearsay? If low voltage is destructive, then power off (always a slowly dropping voltage) is also destructive. Low voltage is not harmful to electronics. Low voltage is potentially harmful to motorized appliances. So the utility must maintain a sufficient voltage. Or disconnect power. So that your refrigerator, furnace, and air conditioner is not damaged.

What is low voltage? Normal voltage for electronics is even when incandescent bulbs dim to 50% intensity. How often do your bulbs dim that much? Never? Then why do you need protection from something that does not exist? Because so many learn from hearsay. Because so many fear without first learning the numbers.

Same applies to high voltage. For example, a surge might create 300 volts across the protector while leaving 5000 volts across an adjacent appliance. Protection is not about voltage. Protection is about where tens of thousands of amperes flow. And where hundreds of thousands of joules harmlessly dissipate.

A surge properly earthed before entering the building does not overwhelm protection already inside every appliance (including laptops). Worry about where current (ie lightning) flows. Since lightning is maybe 20,000 amps, then informed consumers earth one 'whole house' protector that is at least 50,000 amps. Then current remains outside. A solution that may cost about $1 per protected appliance. And rarely known to a majority only educated by hearsay and advertising.

Edited by westom, 25 September 2013 - 06:48 AM.

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#5
Down_with_malware

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I agree with west that low voltage shouldn't be a concern to you. However, I have found a nice surge suppressor for

you for 10 dollars. It is dell brand. http://accessories.u...309152537461010 It should be more then enough for your needs. :thumbsup:

Any other questions?
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#6
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I agree with west that low voltage shouldn't be a concern to you. However, I have found a nice surge suppressor for

you for 10 dollars. It is dell brand. http://accessories.u...309152537461010 It should be more then enough for your needs. :thumbsup:

Any other questions?


Thanks . I'll have a surge protector.
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#7
westom

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Thanks . I'll have a surge protector.

Which one? A (that) type that does not claim to protect from destructive surges? Or a completely different device (also called a surge protector) that is the only solution earthed for the other and typically destructive surge?

View spec numbers for that power strip. It only claims to use 360 joules and never more than 525 joules during a surge. Those are near zero surges - already made irrelevant by protection inside every electronic appliance. Destructive surges are hundreds of thousands of joules.

Edited by westom, 26 September 2013 - 06:24 AM.

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#8
phillpower2

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I would suggest a UPS with surge protection such as the example HERE

A different take on computers and their associated hardware receiving voltage that is too low, for a computer to function correctly and to avoid damage to all hardware you must have a power supply that can provide enough clean and stable power to all devices, hardware such as add on video cards can be very power hungry and a PSU that is not producing enough power will be depriving the major hardware of the said power which will weaken them and bring about a premature end of their life expectancy, this if the PSU does not pop first and take out the whole computer.
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#9
westom

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... a PSU that is not producing enough power will be depriving the major hardware of the said power which will weaken them and bring about a premature end of their life expectancy, this if the PSU does not pop first and take out the whole computer.

Good. So you list each internal component damaged or threatened by low voltage. And provide numbers from manufacturer datasheets that defines risk and resulting damage. Layman can quickly identify bogus claims: no hard facts and no numbers.

First, some specification numbers. Earliest digital electronics were the 4000 series. View its datasheet
Voltage that cause no damage are anywhere from +20 volts to -0.5 volts. How can this be when low voltage causes damage? Voltage can even go slightly negative with no damage. Contradicting urban myths about destructive low voltages.

Second, later digital electronics were the 74xx00 series. Another datasheet. Voltages without damage are anywhere from -0.5 to 7 volts. How can this be when urban myths said low voltage causes damage. Destructive low voltages exist when using wild speculation; by ignoring basic electronic concepts and numbers.

Third. Shorting all PSU outputs causes maximum power draw. Drawing excessive power definitely damages a PSU - the subjective claim. ATX power supply standard requires testing all PSUs by shorting all outputs together? The spec even defines how thick that shorting wire must be to maximize output power. The spec then says that short circuit must not cause any PSU damage. Clearly the spec must be lying because we were told drawing too much power causes hardware damage. We were told that by one who never cites datasheets or numbers. Who never says which parts are at risk.

Claims made without hard facts and numbers are routinely suspect. Some with least technical knowledge post no numbers; cite no manufacturer specs; never read datasheets. Somehow hearsay becomes knowledge that even contradicts industry standards.

Four. Designers test hardware using excessively low AC voltage. Because a PSU must output rock stable and unchanging voltages even when AC mains voltage drops so low that ... incandescent bulbs dim to 50%.

Tom MacIntyre describes what we designers do to confirm everything works normal and happy at low voltages. He also provides numbers:

We operate everything on an isolated variac, which means that I can control the voltage going into the unit I am working on from about 150 volts down to zero. This enables us to verify power regulation for over and under-voltage situations.
... due to the current and duty cycle of the switching, they [switching power supplies] can and will regulate with very low voltages on the AC line in; the best I've seen was a TV which didn't die until I turned the variac down to 37 VAC! A brownout wouldn't have even affected the picture on that set.

Not die as in damage. Die as in routine powered off when AC voltage is too low. Too low for that 120 volt appliance was 37 volts. And no damage. Because low voltage must not and does not damage properly designed electronics ... as demonstrated by datasheets and numbers ... and Tom MacIntyre.

Low voltage is a threat to motorized appliances. And does not harm electronics.

Edited by westom, 26 September 2013 - 10:02 PM.

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#10
Down_with_malware

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I found a really great one you might like also! Although a bit on the pricy side of 60 dollars, it is really excellent. PowerSquid Surge Protector: Calamari Edition

It offers 2160 Joules of surge protection which is quiet a bit! You can also go with Phills suggestion if you want. :) Surge protection is important for electronic health.

Even has a lifetime warranty! Plus $75,000 Equipment insurance. You get what you pay for.

Edited by Down_with_malware, 27 September 2013 - 12:04 AM.

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#11
phillpower2

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I found a really great one you might like also! Although a bit on the pricy side of 60 dollars, it is really excellent. PowerSquid Surge Protector: Calamari Edition

It offers 2160 Joules of surge protection which is quiet a bit! You can also go with Phills suggestion if you want. :) Surge protection is important for electronic health.

Even has a lifetime warranty! Plus $75,000 Equipment insurance. You get what you pay for.

Not familiar with the PowerSquid would This be along the same lines Down_with_malware :unsure:
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#12
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I couldn't risk it so bought an UPS with surge protection.
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#13
phillpower2

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Thanks for the follow up 00pm :thumbsup:
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