Jump to content

Welcome to Geeks to Go - Register now for FREE

Geeks To Go is a helpful hub, where thousands of volunteer geeks quickly serve friendly answers and support. Check out the forums and get free advice from the experts. Register now to gain access to all of our features, it's FREE and only takes one minute. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more.

Create Account How it Works
Photo

RAM Not Running at Full Speed


  • Please log in to reply

#31
Webslinger64

Webslinger64

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 555 posts

I still think his Windows is hosed not the BIOS. This is why I never advise or encourage OCing to anybody. It's not worth it.


I should not have tried OCing without knowing more about what I was doing, that's for sure. After my PC issues get fixed, I will likely not touch BIOS for OCing with a 10 ft. pole.
  • 0

Advertisements


#32
iammykyl

iammykyl

    Tech Staff

  • Technician
  • 6,758 posts
Gday.

Brazened
I still think his Windows is hosed not the BIOS. This is why I never advise or encourage OCing to anybody. It's not worth it.


Overclocking the CPU was a mishap, unfortunatye it was so over the top, enabling XMP was the aim.

Webslinger64

Reinstall of heatsink/fan. You must completely clean of old TIM from both the CPU top and plate of the heatsink, I use 98% isopropyl alcohol, or a cleaning kit like this,
> http://www.newegg.co...N82E16835100010 Try not to remove the CPU from the socket, one less thing to go wrong on reinstall, use cotton buds, blot, so you don't flood the socket.
Please remember, you must rearm the locking pins on the cooler. Apply TIM as per instructions and after install, inspect the locking pins on the back of the MB to make sure they are all the same length and fully engaged.

Have you instilled the new PSU?
When you had safe mode up, did you actually attempt starting "safe mode with networking", if so, what was the result?
  • 0

#33
Brazened

Brazened

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 184 posts

I still think his Windows is hosed not the BIOS. This is why I never advise or encourage OCing to anybody. It's not worth it.


I should not have tried OCing without knowing more about what I was doing, that's for sure. After my PC issues get fixed, I will likely not touch BIOS for OCing with a 10 ft. pole.


You're not to blame, blame the BIOS for proposing too extreme an OCing. It gave you false sense of security. Anyway OCing is for those who have motherboards and CPUs made for OCing. You just wanted to up your ram to rated speed, that's fine but it won't make much of a difference.

Edited by Brazened, 11 November 2013 - 09:36 PM.

  • 0

#34
Webslinger64

Webslinger64

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 555 posts

Gday.

Brazened
I still think his Windows is hosed not the BIOS. This is why I never advise or encourage OCing to anybody. It's not worth it.


Overclocking the CPU was a mishap, unfortunatye it was so over the top, enabling XMP was the aim.

Webslinger64

Reinstall of heatsink/fan. You must completely clean of old TIM from both the CPU top and plate of the heatsink, I use 98% isopropyl alcohol, or a cleaning kit like this,
> http://www.newegg.co...N82E16835100010 Try not to remove the CPU from the socket, one less thing to go wrong on reinstall, use cotton buds, blot, so you don't flood the socket.
Please remember, you must rearm the locking pins on the cooler. Apply TIM as per instructions and after install, inspect the locking pins on the back of the MB to make sure they are all the same length and fully engaged.

Have you instilled the new PSU?
When you had safe mode up, did you actually attempt starting "safe mode with networking", if so, what was the result?


Will do, thanks for the suggestions. I have installed the new PSU, Corsair CX750M. When the PC last booted up to the Safe Mode menu screen, I did not select "Safe Mode with Networking", I just selected "Safe Mode". I'll try your suggestion here in the next day or two after I've taken care of the CPU overheating problem.
Thanks!
  • 0

#35
Troy

Troy

    Tech Staff

  • Technician
  • 8,839 posts

I still think his Windows is hosed not the BIOS. This is why I never advise or encourage OCing to anybody. It's not worth it.

Something's not right either way, and the first port of call (to ever get any sort of PC running correctly) is to get the hardware running properly. So that includes hardware compatibility, components seated correctly (i.e. thermal paste etc...), and BIOS configured correctly.

Once hardware's correct, then we can look at making sure the OS is sorted as well.
  • 0

#36
Brazened

Brazened

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 184 posts
I'm sure his hardware's ok, he's got the BIOS back to normal. Only problem is he cannot get Windows to load up and his recovery disk told him that.

I think y'all are making a mountain out of a molehill.

Webslinger, got a friend with a pc? Pull your drive and have your friend put it in as a secondary drive. With his windows access your drive from My Computer.

Edited by Brazened, 12 November 2013 - 08:06 PM.

  • 0

#37
Webslinger64

Webslinger64

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 555 posts

I still think his Windows is hosed not the BIOS. This is why I never advise or encourage OCing to anybody. It's not worth it.

Something's not right either way, and the first port of call (to ever get any sort of PC running correctly) is to get the hardware running properly. So that includes hardware compatibility, components seated correctly (i.e. thermal paste etc...), and BIOS configured correctly.

Once hardware's correct, then we can look at making sure the OS is sorted as well.


I should have the CPU/hs/fan reinstalled by tomorrow evening. Hopefully that goes well and hardware problems are behind us. Will let you know.
BTW, I have installed an additional intake fan on the front of the case. I hope this provides some extra relief for the CPU. So my setup is; Two 120mm intake fans on the front of the case, a 140mm top fan and a 120mm rear fan for exhaust. My question about the case fan setup now is how do I power them all? I can power 3 fans from the MB. My PSU does not have a case fan power connector. It seems there are a few options to consider in order to make this work; 1) installing 3-Pin Y-Cable / Splitter for Case Fan Connection / 3-pin Extension Cable so I can power all fans from MB, 2) installing APEVIA Model CVT43 Power 4 PIN Adapter TO 3 PIN Fan Adapter to power additional fans from the PSU itself, or 3) installing a NZXT Sentry-2 5.25" Touch Screen Fan Controller and controlling all case fans from the interface. Is one of these options a preferred method?

I'm sure his hardware's ok, he's got the BIOS back to normal. Only problem is he cannot get Windows to load up and his recovery disk told him that.

I think y'all are making a mountain out of a molehill.

Webslinger, got a friend with a pc? Pull your drive and have your friend put it in as a secondary drive. With his windows access your drive from My Computer.


Your recommendation is to do it this way so I can backup/save my data from the problem HDD to a working HDD/Windows OS right? Then what, reinstall Windows OS from scratch on my HDD and transfer backup to my HDD once the OS is fixed?
I had also read somewhere that with Windows 7, you can reinstall the OS but not format the HDD. The reinstall will then save all data from the HDD into a folder called Windows.Old - I copied and pasted the instructions below. Thought this might be a good option unless the pros here at GTG think otherwise.

There is a cool feature of the Windows Vista and 7 installers. If you have a previous install of Windows on the HDD (be it XP, Vista or 7) and start the new install it will actually do whats called a Old Files so long as you do not format the HDD.

What it does is it will install 7 and tak the old Windows install and put it on C:\ in a folder called 'Windows.Old'. This includes the entire old C:\ from the previous install including Program Files, Windows folder and User folder.

What you need to do is get into your BIOS (or if you have a OEM computer such as a Dell, HP or Toshiba press the button to open the boot manager) and tell it to boot to the CD/DVD. Have the Windows 7 install disk in the drive and boot to it. When it starts, tell it to install Windows and when you get to the part with the HDD, do not format it. Just click next. It will tell you it found a previous Windows installation and that it will move it to 'Windows.Old'. Continue with the install and there ya go.

You will have access to all the old files you had before, minus Programs since they wont be registered properly but will still be there.

We use this at work all the time if a customer has a really nasty Windows killing Virus. Makes it so much easier since we do not have to transfer the files to a bench machine, install Windows and then transfer back. All we do is scan it clean, Install Windows and then move the wanted files over.

After you get what you want you can delete the entire folder so it doesn't take up any HDD space.

  • 0

#38
Brazened

Brazened

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 184 posts
I only wanted to see if you can access your drive ie read it. This is how to find out if it's software or hardware problem.
  • 0

#39
Webslinger64

Webslinger64

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 555 posts

I only wanted to see if you can access your drive ie read it. This is how to find out if it's software or hardware problem.


I see, sounds like a good idea.
  • 0

#40
Troy

Troy

    Tech Staff

  • Technician
  • 8,839 posts

I only wanted to see if you can access your drive ie read it. This is how to find out if it's software or hardware problem.

This can easily be done by running a diagnostic tool from a bootable CD, such as the manufacturer's drive diagnostic (i.e. SeaTools for Seagate drives, WDDiag for Western Digital Drives), or even a live Linux disc will help us do this - and save the hassle of removing and reinstalling the drive again.

Also a live Linux disc is an easy option to recover the user data onto a spare backup drive just to be sure, there was a how-to in the forum here somewhere... found it: http://www.geekstogo...over-your-data/
  • 0

Advertisements


#41
Brazened

Brazened

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 184 posts

I only wanted to see if you can access your drive ie read it. This is how to find out if it's software or hardware problem.


I see, sounds like a good idea.


Right and I'm pretty sure your data is intact but the boot up is hosed. No matter what you do you couldn't get Windows. That's your only problem right?
  • 0

#42
Webslinger64

Webslinger64

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 555 posts

I only wanted to see if you can access your drive ie read it. This is how to find out if it's software or hardware problem.


I see, sounds like a good idea.


Right and I'm pretty sure your data is intact but the boot up is hosed. No matter what you do you couldn't get Windows. That's your only problem right?


Yes, I believe so.
  • 0

#43
Webslinger64

Webslinger64

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 555 posts

I only wanted to see if you can access your drive ie read it. This is how to find out if it's software or hardware problem.


I see, sounds like a good idea.


Right and I'm pretty sure your data is intact but the boot up is hosed. No matter what you do you couldn't get Windows. That's your only problem right?


I hope to have the CPU installed tonight and working properly. Then I'm ready to move on with OS.
  • 0

#44
Webslinger64

Webslinger64

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 555 posts

Thanks Troy for coming in to help. Will stand aside for the moment.


OK, so I've made several attempts at applying thermal compound to the h/s & CPU without much success at getting the CPU temps down. The best I could do was a 5 degree drop from 65°C to 60°C. I am using Arctic MX-4 thermal compound. I have tried both the small pea/BB size method and the vertical line method. So my question now is this, if I apply TC and get a 5 degree drop, will the temperature decrease more if I leave the PC off for the night and turn it on in the morning? Does CPU temperature improve as the TC cures?
  • 0

#45
Brazened

Brazened

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 184 posts
It does take time to spread under pressure then it should get better. What I like to do is to rub the HS on the CPU to spread it out then clamp it down. Do it in a circular fashion.
  • 0






Similar Topics

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

As Featured On:

Microsoft Yahoo BBC MSN PC Magazine Washington Post HP