Jump to content

Welcome to Geeks to Go - Register now for FREE

Geeks To Go is a helpful hub, where thousands of volunteer geeks quickly serve friendly answers and support. Check out the forums and get free advice from the experts. Register now to gain access to all of our features, it's FREE and only takes one minute. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more.

Create Account How it Works
Photo

Got advice about buying uninterruptible power supply (UPS) / battery b


  • Please log in to reply

#1
conceptualclarity

conceptualclarity

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 36 posts
I have just bought a new custom-built computer and Dell monitor as well as installing a new Brother printer.

I liked the looks of a CyperPower model I found at Office Depot. 625 VA, 375 watts, three-year warranty, with its own power monitoring software.

But I need to know what will be enough. It's been suggested that the above specs would be a bit precarious. For a good while I will be running two computers and their monitors as I transition.

Current system :
Windows XP
Home Edition
Version 2002
32-bit
Service Pack 3
Dell DIMENSION DIM2400
Intel®
Pentium® 4 CPU 2.66GHz
x86 Family 15 Model 2 Stepping 9
2.05 GB of RAM
Graphics Card: Intel® 82845G/GL/GE/PE/GV
Graphics Controller, 64 Mb
Hard Drive Size 114.4GB
Free Space was 35.8GB; now under 20GB because after backing up My Documents on Google Drive, Google Drive has duplicated the whole darn thing on my hard drive
Motherboard: Dell Computer Corp., 0G1548
Antivirus : Webroot Internet Security


My new custom-built computer :
Intel Core i7 Processor i7-3770K 3.5GHz 8MB QUAD CORE
INTEL COPPER HEAVY DUTY LGA 1155 COOLING FAN
OCZ/ARCTIC Ultra 5+ Silver Thermal Compound
PROFESSIONAL WIRING
Asus P8B75-V LGA1155/ Intel B75/ SATA3&USB3.0 ATX Motherboard
16GB (2 x 8GB) 240-Pin DDR3 1600MHz (PC3 12800) Dual Channel
(2X) MEMORY HEAT SPREADERS
(2X) 1TB 7200 RPM 64MB CACHE SATA 6.0Gb/s
24X DUAL LAYER DVD-RW
INTEL HD 3000 1GB HDMI/DVI/VGA 1080p PCI-EXPRESS VIDEO (ONBOARD)
REALTEK 8-CHANNEL DIGITAL SOUND ONBOARD
REALTEK 10/100/1000 Gigabit Network Card (onboard)
HEC Blitz Black Steel Edition ATX Mid Tower Case
DELUXE COOLING PACKAGE
SEASONIC 620 WATT ULTRA HIGH PERFORMANCE POWER SUPPLY
Logitech Wired USB Keyboard
Logitech Wired USB Black 3 Buttons Optical Mouse
i-Micro 2.0 Channel Multimedia Speakers

My new monitor :
Dell Computer Corp E2414H 24" LED LCD Monitor
AC input voltage/frequency/current 100 to 240 VAC/50 or 60 Hz + 3 Hz/1.5 A (Max.)
Inrush current 120 V:30 A (Max.)
240 V:60 A (Max.)

Printer :
Brother MFC-7340
Power Source AC 120V 50/60Hz
Power Consumption - Sleep/Ready/Copying
10W / 75W / 460W

Edited by conceptualclarity, 13 December 2013 - 11:20 AM.

  • 0

Advertisements


#2
Kemasa

Kemasa

    Nobody

  • Technician
  • 1,575 posts
What are your requirements? How long do you want it to run?

It appears that the total power you listed exceeds the max power of that UPS. Also, laser printers and UPS don't tend to go together unless you are talking a serious UPS.

You might want to check out APC's site, specifically:

http://www.apc.com/t...US/en/home/load

Which allows you to enter the information and what you are looking to do.

Personally, I would say that it is too small. Also remember that as it ages, the batteries will be able to provide less power. To me, a minimum would be a 1000VA.

It is possible to find older units without batteries for a good price and then replace the batteries.
  • 1

#3
conceptualclarity

conceptualclarity

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 36 posts
Thanks.

I will continue to plug that laser printer into a surge protector rather than a UPS.

The specs for my old Dell all-in-one desktop :
Wattage 200w or 250 W
Voltage 100 to 120 V at 60 Hz; 200 to 240 V at 50 Hz
  • 0

#4
conceptualclarity

conceptualclarity

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 36 posts
Will simulated sine wave be good enough for my system, or will I need pure sine wave?

https://www.dougv.co...st-low-end-ups/

Edited by conceptualclarity, 13 December 2013 - 03:56 PM.

  • 0

#5
Kemasa

Kemasa

    Nobody

  • Technician
  • 1,575 posts
If you have a surge suppressor connected to the UPS, you will need a pure sine wave as the stepped output appears to be a surge and so it can cause problems. If you connect the machine directly, then either will work. Some power distribution devices also have a surge suppressor in them, as well as many power strips.

Did you try the calculator? How long do you want to be able to run when the power is out?

BTW, a KVM switch can make it easy to use two computers and reduces the second keyboard, mouse and screen.
  • 1

#6
conceptualclarity

conceptualclarity

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 36 posts

If you have a surge suppressor connected to the UPS, you will need a pure sine wave as the stepped output appears to be a surge and so it can cause problems. If you connect the machine directly, then either will work


My surge protector is on the table rather than plugged into the wall. So I don't imagine there will be any problem keeping it separate from the UPS.

Did you try the calculator? How long do you want to be able to run when the power is out?


I will be using that calculator. I would like it to run as long as possible, like for when I get up from a nap or something.

BTW, a KVM switch can make it easy to use two computers and reduces the second keyboard, mouse and screen.


Oh, wow. Thanks for mentioning that. I have never heard of that. Just when I think I've got all the parts I need...

Please tell me all you can about KVM switches. I expect to make modest use of my old computer even after the transition period.
  • 0

#7
Kemasa

Kemasa

    Nobody

  • Technician
  • 1,575 posts
You don't want to plug the surge protector into the UPS, it does that job and when it runs on battery it can cause problems unless the UPS puts out a true sine wave.

Well, running as long as possible means getting the largest UPS possible or also getting a generator.

As for a KVM, you need to get one which can switch the types of keyboards/mouse you have. If both have a USB keyboard, then it will easier. If one has a USB keyboard, then it might be harder to get a KVM which can handle both.

Some examples:

http://www.newegg.co.../ID-143?Tpk=kvm
  • 0

#8
conceptualclarity

conceptualclarity

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 36 posts

BTW, a KVM switch can make it easy to use two computers and reduces the second keyboard, mouse and screen.


http://www.newegg.co.../ID-143?Tpk=kvm


KVM switches save you money because you won't have to purchase separate keyboards, mice, and monitors for each computer you use.


After reading the paragraphs at the bottom of that page, I don't understand why I would need a KVM switch. I will be having separate keyboards, mice, and monitors.
  • 0

#9
Kemasa

Kemasa

    Nobody

  • Technician
  • 1,575 posts
If you want to have separate monitors and keyboards, then there is no reason for a KVM. Part of it is saving desktop space since you don't have to have room for two monitors, keyboards and mice, plus it is easier to switch back and forth.
  • 1






Similar Topics

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

As Featured On:

Microsoft Yahoo BBC MSN PC Magazine Washington Post HP