Jump to content

Welcome to Geeks to Go - Register now for FREE

Geeks To Go is a helpful hub, where thousands of volunteer geeks quickly serve friendly answers and support. Check out the forums and get free advice from the experts. Register now to gain access to all of our features, it's FREE and only takes one minute. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more.

Create Account How it Works
Photo

Wireless access at my house is a mess...


  • Please log in to reply

#1
Biscuithd

Biscuithd

    Trusted Helper

  • Malware Removal
  • 2,573 posts
I sure could use some advice and help on trouble shooting the mess I've made of my wireless setup at home. It all started with Time Warner foisting a wireless router/modem on me. Prior to T/W's "help", I had a TW cable modem and my own Wireless router. Life was good. Then they insisted I needed their combo modem/router.

First step, I changed out my wireless router for their combo router/modem. With much "Help" from TW tech support, all devices (except one) in the house (several laptops, kindles, ipad's, etc.) finally connected to the TW router and worked well. The exception is my Windows 8.1 machine. TW can't make it connect to the TW router and I can't either. However, I can make it connect to the old wireless router. However, now it seems that none of the other devices in the house can connect to the Old Router. (I added in the Old Router by running a N/W cable from the TW router to the Old Router. I also made sure the both routers had different SSID's.

First things first, I'd like the W8.1 machine to be able to connect to the TW router.
Then, I'd like all devices to be able to connect to the Old Router too.
Last, I'd like to run two wireless networks in the house consisting of the TW router and Old Router.

Anyone up for coaching me through this mess :help:. Thanks in advance!!:thumbsup:
  • 0

Advertisements


#2
Dakeyras

Dakeyras

    Anti-Malware Mammoth

  • Expert
  • 9,613 posts
Have you tired deactivating the Router side of the Modem and merely use it in Cable-Modem mode only in-conjunction with your own Router and thus just use one wireless network for all ? What I did when my own ISP foisted their so called qwasi Cable-Modem/Router on myself as I encountered similar problems...

To be honest I do not think the particular set-up you are actually wanting is really practicable in the long run and hence all the connectivity issues. Though saying that it can be done, just using two different SSID's is not enough...

You will actually have to ensure two different Wireless Channels are assigned to each Router as otherwise it will cause problems of the nature you have been experiencing. :)
  • 0

#3
Biscuithd

Biscuithd

    Trusted Helper

  • Topic Starter
  • Malware Removal
  • 2,573 posts
Dakeyras, thank you so much for your advice! I think I understand what you are saying.

You will actually have to ensure two different Wireless Channels are assigned to each Router

I'd imagine there are setting beyond this too.

It's interesting how all of this started. I brought home the Time Warner device, disconnected my wireless router and inserted theirs. I used the same SSID as my old one and voila, every device in the house worked quickly and easily...except my Acer/W indows 8 machine. When Time Warner tech support could not solve the issue, I inserted my old wireless router, thus creating the double setup I now have. Only the W8 machine can use the old router (with different SSID) and everybody else can only use the new router. I'm wondering if any of this was caused when I did the setup of the Time Warner "setup" using a network cable rather than in wireless mode?

The weekend, when time allows, I will try removing all but the Time Warner router and doing the Factory Reset using the recessed button on the back and try setting up the router from scratch. BTW, is the channel selection somthing I do or does the router, in combination with my wireless card, make that selection?
  • 0

#4
Dakeyras

Dakeyras

    Anti-Malware Mammoth

  • Expert
  • 9,613 posts
You're most welcome!

To change the actual Wireless Channel you would need to log into the Router settings using a Web Browser via say:-

http://192.168.0.1/
Which is a commen default one, it may not work for yours so merely look up how to on the appropriate manufacturers/support website and or there may be a PDF Manual on the installation media for example.

Or merely run ipconfig on a machine the Router is connected to via a elevated command prompt etc to reveal the address in use.

Once logged in >> look for a Wireless setting and there should be a option to change the channel. It would also be prudent to set a new admin default password as most of the commonly known defaults are published online. This way you can further secure the Router against becoming compromised. :)
  • 0

#5
Biscuithd

Biscuithd

    Trusted Helper

  • Topic Starter
  • Malware Removal
  • 2,573 posts
Hi Dakeyras,

Uggh! I think I've made progress, but I've also profoundly confused myself too!

Here's what I've got now. I disabled the Wireless portion of the Time Warner router and connected it my ASUS wireless router, per your suggestion. I also am using a program called inSSIDer Office. For the longest time I saw multiple wireless networks on the inSSIDer program and I think I finally puzzled it out. The Asus router has a 2.4g portion and 5g portion. Each is capable of broadcasting a different SSID and allowing connectivity. If decided to name them both the same and use the same password.

Should I leave both on or should I shut off the 2.4g part or the 5g part? How about the Channel? Both are set to Auto and the inSSIDer s/w says to pick a channel that my close neighbors don't have. What I see is my neighbors ussing 6 and 11 and my 2.4 using 6. My 5g is using 36.

What also sent me down this road is signal strength in places away from the router. Do you have any feelings about add on attenena's, repeaters, signal enhancers, magic spells or shamans'?

And, thank you again for all your help!!! If I can ever return the favor, just let me know!
  • 0

#6
Dakeyras

Dakeyras

    Anti-Malware Mammoth

  • Expert
  • 9,613 posts

I disabled the Wireless portion of the Time Warner router and connected it my ASUS wireless router, per your suggestion.

OK.

I also am using a program called inSSIDer Office. For the longest time I saw multiple wireless networks on the inSSIDer program and I think I finally puzzled it out.

No real need to be honest for home use but no harm using it either though it is more aimed towards multi-use wireless channels etc.

The Asus router has a 2.4g portion and 5g portion. Each is capable of broadcasting a different SSID and allowing connectivity. If decided to name them both the same and use the same password.

Personally I think it is better from a security point of view to use a different SSID/Channel and password for each; because if one became compromised a good chance another using the same could also if thought about.

Should I leave both on or should I shut off the 2.4g part or the 5g part? How about the Channel? Both are set to Auto and the inSSIDer s/w says to pick a channel that my close neighbors don't have. What I see is my neighbors ussing 6 and 11 and my 2.4 using 6. My 5g is using 36.

It all depends on what you actually aim to connect wirelessly, for example 2.4g is the standard for most that may be connected, say home computers etc, android phones and tablets for example(802.11g) and newer equipment can use 5g(though this has been around just as long). Either is fine to use as long as all connected are capable of supporting either though for the most part 2.4g will suffice and that is what I use myself. The below article may be of interest/use

Securing Your Router

What also sent me down this road is signal strength in places away from the router. Do you have any feelings about add on attenena's, repeaters, signal enhancers, magic spells or shamans'?

In a home networking environment there should be no need for any form of signal boosting unless the signal is very poor and or intermittent for example. I myself have my actual wireless router in my converted loft now two flights up and can get a decent signal downstairs in the living room area, IE my son's play-station/his laptop connects just fine as does say my own laptop or either of my android devices.

And, thank you again for all your help!!! If I can ever return the favor, just let me know!

You're most welcome! :)
  • 0






Similar Topics

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

As Featured On:

Microsoft Yahoo BBC MSN PC Magazine Washington Post HP