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BIOS, Chipset, and Drivers Questions


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#1
rhymin

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First of all, I am dual booting Ubuntu and Windows 7 (I'm also thinking about installing another OS, Windows Server 2012). I'm on a slightly older PC using an M2N-SLI DELUXE Mobo. I have a few questions related to the BIOS and mobo drivers:

1) According to CPU-Z, my latest BIOS version is 1102 which was in 2007. On ASUS website, I see the most recent version is "BETA version 1804" released in 2010. Do you guys recommend I get a BETA version of BIOS update, or should I get the most recent non-BETA version?

2) Under BIOS utilities, I see a BIOS flash tool. Do I need this in order to update my BIOS version?

3) Will I need to get drivers for both Windows 7 and Linux in regard to the chipset?

4) Is there anything else I need to be aware of or accomplish with the motherboard since I am dual-booting?

Thank you so much!
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#2
SleepyDude

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Hi,

First of all, I am dual booting Ubuntu and Windows 7 (I'm also thinking about installing another OS, Windows Server 2012). I'm on a slightly older PC using an M2N-SLI DELUXE Mobo. I have a few questions related to the BIOS and mobo drivers:

1) According to CPU-Z, my latest BIOS version is 1102 which was in 2007. On ASUS website, I see the most recent version is "BETA version 1804" released in 2010. Do you guys recommend I get a BETA version of BIOS update, or should I get the most recent non-BETA version?

If everything is working properly leave the BIOS update alone. In my opinion you should update the BIOS only when there is some problem working with new installed hardware or if the BIOS update include some new feature that you *really* need.

2) Under BIOS utilities, I see a BIOS flash tool. Do I need this in order to update my BIOS version?

On older motherboards usually to apply the BIOS update you have to use some DOS or Windows tool.

3) Will I need to get drivers for both Windows 7 and Linux in regard to the chipset?

For Windows 7 eventually Yes if not already included on the OS, linux is different the kernel should recognize the "devices" related to the Chipset.

4) Is there anything else I need to be aware of or accomplish with the motherboard since I am dual-booting?

If you are starting to install the OS's on machine now, first install Windows 7 and leave some free space (without partition) at end of the disk for Linux or use a second Hard Disk.
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#3
rhymin

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Thank you very much for the quick reply! I have a follow up question to #4:

I already had Windows 7 installed on the machine, and installed Ubuntu after. What exactly do you mean by "leave some free space (without partition) at the end of the disk for Linux"? Does this just mean to leave several GB for Ubuntu to use so no crashes appear?

Actually, something weird happened in my process of partitioning the drives, as follows:

I have a 500 GB (which shows up as 465.76 GB) for Disk 0.

In Windows 7 (before I installed Ubuntu), I shrunk the C: volume 2 different times for 100 GB each. (I thought this would leave separate 100 GB of unallocated space for each OS I intended to install (Ubuntu and Win Server 2012), but it added it together for 200 GB of unallocated space.

Now I am left with the following:

Posted Image

As you can see, 101 + 265.66 + 192 + 8 = 566.66 GB, when it should just equal 465.76 GB. I'm a little confused to why Windows 7 is showing it as this?
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#4
SleepyDude

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Thank you very much for the quick reply! I have a follow up question to #4:

I already had Windows 7 installed on the machine, and installed Ubuntu after. What exactly do you mean by "leave some free space (without partition) at the end of the disk for Linux"? Does this just mean to leave several GB for Ubuntu to use so no crashes appear?

When you install Linux the installed will have to create different types of partitions, and usually when it finds unallocated space it will use all the space for the OS unless you choose to partition the disk yourself.

Actually, something weird happened in my process of partitioning the drives, as follows:

I have a 500 GB (which shows up as 465.76 GB) for Disk 0.

In Windows 7 (before I installed Ubuntu), I shrunk the C: volume 2 different times for 100 GB each. (I thought this would leave separate 100 GB of unallocated space for each OS I intended to install (Ubuntu and Win Server 2012), but it added it together for 200 GB of unallocated space.

If you use the shrink capability of the Windows Disk Manager it have some limitations in what it allow you to do.
Somehow you left 100MB of free space on the beginning of the HDD.
EaseUS Partition Master Free it's a better tool to do that...

Now I am left with the following:

As you can see, 101 + 265.66 + 192 + 8 = 566.66 GB, when it should just equal 465.76 GB. I'm a little confused to why Windows 7 is showing it as this?

Actually it's 101 MB = 0.099 GB
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#5
rhymin

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Oh, wow! Brain fart!

Thank you so much for your help SleepyDude.
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