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Question about simultaneous hard drive writing


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#1
Rex_Kramer707

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I've been wondering about this for a long time. I currently use Windows 7 and frequently organize lots of files between several external hard drives. Let's say I start a copy operation from one hard drive to another. While the files are being written to the destination hard drive I drag and drop another set of files to the same destination hard drive. So there are two copy operations going on simultaneously. Are there any negative ramifications to copying files this way? Instead of one group of data being written before starting the next set, I image the data is all intermingled on the physical hard disc. Perhaps it might slow down reading the files later? I wish to do this because I'm often searching for specific types that I want moved or want to copy things from multiple discs to a single disc and let it copy overnight.

Often the files I'm moving are large media files from 500 Mb to 8 GB. Does the size make a difference to any negative ramifications? Maybe a greater chance of slow access to a movie or something?

Since the available space on the hard disc is probably not all lined up neatly anyway (defragmented, I think), perhaps it doesn't matter.

Now what about more than two at the same time? Can I drag and drop 10 groups of files to a hard drive simultaneously? Well, I know I can, but I want to follow best practices. Mainly, my priority is reducing the possibility of data corruption. Secondly, reading performance.

Does it make a difference on the type of destination storage media? I use NTFS hard discs (internal and external), internal SSD, and SD cards.

Does it make a difference if I'm doing this within Windows 7 or 8, Android or OS X?

Thanks for any info on this!
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#2
iammykyl

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Gday.
If you have folder A and folder B, on the C drive, and you say, copy to the X drive. Data is read from the beginning of folder A through to the end of folder B and written in that order too the X drive. Does not matter how many folder you add, they are processed in the order presented.
A folder, say A, is not contained together like pages in a book but is written, (start to finish) in the next available space on X. The space may be big enough to take three pages or only three words but is marked as belonging to folder A.
This Wiki will explain implications of fragmentation. > http://en.wikipedia....m_fragmentation

File system type is not so important for speed, but the transfer method is. Fastest would be SSD to SSD, highest bandwidth. If you are copying from a SATA HDD, another SATA HDD.

Type of OS does not matter, the speed of the HDD is the limiting factor.

You will get more specific detailed information by using a search engine.

Good luck..
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#3
Rex_Kramer707

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Gday.
If you have folder A and folder B, on the C drive, and you say, copy to the X drive. Data is read from the beginning of folder A through to the end of folder B and written in that order too the X drive.


I don't believe this is true. Let's say I'm transferring data from folders A, B & C in one hard drive. I begin a large amount of data transferring from A. I then begin half as much data from B. Then half of that from C. All of this being transferred to the same folder in a separate hard drive. It will finish C then B then A in that order, generally, because the smaller amount of data will finish first, regardless of the order in which you began the transfer with respect to the other transfers. I have three progress windows showing me the writing in progress. It's not like the progress is paused on B and C until A is finished.

Thanks for the additional info, but the fact that transferred data from all the folders is being written to the same (but separate from the origination drive) destination drive at the same time leaves me with the same question.

Edited by Rex_Kramer707, 15 January 2014 - 10:40 AM.

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#4
iammykyl

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Gday.
Looks like I need some more education.
From these answers, note the ref to Teracopy. > http://superuser.com/questions/252959/which-is-faster-copying-everything-at-once-or-one-thing-at-a-time
More, sam site, > http://superuser.com...after-the-other
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#5
Rex_Kramer707

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Hmm, interesting. I guess the only factor people are worried about is latency. And as one user noted, any loss in writing speed for multiple copy operations is more than made up for in not creating a special queue to copy all the file in one fell swoop. Cool, I will move ahead with performing simultaneous copies if needed in the future.
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#6
iammykyl

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Let us know how that works out.
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#7
Rex_Kramer707

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Yesterday I had around 8 simultaneous copy operations going to the same folder in the same drive. Worked fine. I started it before I went to sleep, so the time didn't matter to me.
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