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Questions about different versions of android.


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#1
jtg22

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I'm in the process of purchasing a tablet, and I'm seeing a few different versions of Android listed for them (honeycomb, jelly belly, ice cream sandwich, kitkat, etc). Basically, here's what I'd like to know:

-Is there any version of android that I absolutely should avoid? All things being equal, I'd ideally go for the newest version possible; however, I'm unsure if this is true for android. (My experience with Windows is that newer isn't necessarily better).

-I understand that android updates on Nexus tablets first with others receiving updates months later, if ever. How bad is it if a tablet doesn't get an android update? Two Updates? (I'm seeing Ice Cream and Honeycomb builds for some tablets on Newegg; I'm wondering if this is too old or something).

Thank you
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#2
SpywareDr

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Wikipedia > Android Operating System > Update schedule

Google provides major updates, incremental in nature, to Android every six to nine months, which most devices are capable of receiving over the air.[77] The latest major update is Android 4.4 KitKat.[5]
Nexus 5, most recent smartphone in the Nexus range

Compared to its chief rival mobile operating system, namely iOS, Android updates are typically slow to reach actual devices. For devices not under the Nexus brand, updates often arrive months from the time the given version is officially released.[78] This is caused partly due to the extensive variation in hardware of Android devices, to which each update must be specifically tailored, as the official Google source code only runs on their flagship Nexus devices. Porting Android to specific hardware is a time- and resource-consuming process for device manufacturers, who prioritize their newest devices and often leave older ones behind.[78] Hence, older smartphones are frequently not updated if the manufacturer decides it is not worth their time, regardless of whether the phone is capable of running the update. This problem is compounded when manufacturers customize Android with their own interface and apps, which must be reapplied to each new release. Additional delays can be introduced by wireless carriers who, after receiving updates from manufacturers, further customize and brand Android to their needs and conduct extensive testing on their networks before sending the update out to users.[78]

The lack of after-sale support from manufacturers and carriers has been widely criticized by consumer groups and the technology media.[79][80] Some commentators have noted that the industry has a financial incentive not to update their devices, as the lack of updates for existing devices fuels the purchase of newer ones,[81] an attitude described as "insulting".[80] The Guardian has complained that the complicated method of distribution for updates is only complicated because manufacturers and carriers have designed it that way.[80] In 2011, Google partnered with a number of industry players to announce an "Android Update Alliance", pledging to deliver timely updates for every device for 18 months after its release;[82] however, this alliance has never been mentioned since.[78]

In 2012, Google began decoupling certain aspects of the operating system (particularly core applications) so they could be updated through Google Play Store, independently of Android itself. One of these components, Google Play Services, is a system-level process providing APIs for Google services, installed automatically on nearly all devices running Android version 2.2 and higher. With these changes, Google can add new operating system functionality through Play Services and application updates without having to distribute an update to the operating system itself. As a result, Android 4.2 and 4.3 contained relatively fewer user-facing changes, focusing more on minor changes and platform improvements.[3][83]

[...continues...]


Edited by SpywareDr, 30 January 2014 - 03:32 PM.

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#3
JasonSwift14

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Hi jtg22,

 

I am a new member here but it would my pleasure to help you. First of all, I am an Android user for many years so I have experience on this field. My 1st Android device had the Jelly Beam Android version. I have to say that I was very satisfied about. Nevertheless, many Android users are complaining the moment that their smartphones are getting the new updates of Android, their smartphones use to get lagged. In my opinion, you have to remember two basic things before updating your Android device. 1) Remember, that if your device is very old-bought, there are many possibilities your device becoming "slower" after Android updating. And this is because the new versions of Android are more designed for the new devices which means that the OS becomes more complicated. 2) Of course, newer is not necessarily better. So my advice is that you have to get informed on blogs or on forums about each update of Android to see if it's good to update your devices. 


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#4
SpywareDr

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JasonSwift14, on 08 Dec 2014 - 4:14 PM, said:
        
I am an Android user for many years ... My 1st Android device had the Jelly Beam Android version.


Jelly Bean was released in 2012 ... a far cry from "many years" ago. ;)
 
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#5
JasonSwift14

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Hi again, 

 

I use the latest version of Android KitKat, I have the LG G2 and I'm absolutely happy! It's easy to see that KitKat version is one the best Android versions and the UI is friendlier and lighter. 


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#6
SpywareDr

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KitKat was replaced by Lollipop on November 3, 2014.


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#7
JasonSwift14

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Hi SpyareDr & Peter Carlos,

 

Yes I know Lollipop is the latest Android version, thanks for the comment!


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#8
SpywareDr

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Peter Carlos, on 15 Dec 2014 - 04:13 AM, said:

well, maybe  you should set this thread as answered ! [ :)]

 

I believe only the OP (original poster "jtg22"), or a Moderator can mark this thread as resolved.


Edited by SpywareDr, 15 December 2014 - 06:05 AM.

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#9
SpywareDr

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:thumbsup:


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#10
SpywareDr

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The latest version, Lollipop version 5.1.x released March 9, 2015. https://en.wikipedia...erating_system)


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