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Laptop HDD->SSD Replacement/Clean Start


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#1
Tatticky

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So, I've got an Asus G60jx that I need to replace the hard drive on. I'm getting weird freezes that I think may be caused by the old one going bad, and I'm due for an upgrade anyways. Also, there are some other things I'd like to do if I'm getting a new HD, such that I think it would be best to just start over with a clean HD.

 

 

So, I'd like help with the following tasks:

 

Extracting all important data and backing it up externally.

I'm not sure whether it would be better to purchase a high-capacity flash drive or external HDD, or to burn it all to a disk. I'm not going to copy over programs, just data.

 

Finding an appropriate replacement hard drive.

I've wanted a Solid-State Drive for a while now, so I'd like to get one if at all possible. I'm willing to drop up to $200 on this, but only if I have to. I'd rather go for less space, but not sacrifice lifespan.

I found a good deal for a new ST480HM000, and so ordered that.

 

Getting core BIOS installed.

My only requirement here is that I install everything personally, so that I can understand what's on my machine thoroughly.

 

Setting up a Dual-Boot system.

I've been meaning to set up a Windows/Linux dual-boot. If I'm ever going to do it, now is the time. Besides for the basics of dual-booting, the biggest question I have is which versions to use. I'm thinking of Windows 7 because I'm used to it, and Debian for maximum control. (I'll need some help setting up the latter as well.)

 

 

Please reply quickly, as my laptop is currently ailing and I'm concerned about data corruption.


Edited by Tatticky, 22 June 2014 - 06:17 PM.

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#2
SpywareDr

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A flash drive is fine for transferring files and temporary storage. Wouldn't trust it for permanent storage though.

 

BIOS = "Basic Input/Output System", which is in a chip (usually a CMOS chip) on the motherboard. OS = "Operating System", such as Windows, Linux, etc.

 

Dual booting is too much trouble. It's much easier to run Linux in a VM (virtual machine) on your Windows Desktop. You can also boot and run Linux (whichever versions) from a little USB drive.


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#3
old-fart

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Setting up dual boot is easy these days. There is plenty of advice available .try linuxquestions.org for example.  Each distro will also have its own forum somewhere. With a Debian based system eg Ubuntu. Use gparted to partition the drive. Spend some time thinking about what sizes to make for two os's to suit. Set windows up first on the first partition. test various linux distros as live boots and when you have decided on one run its installation on the second partition. It'll set up itself nicely and set up the bootloader for dual-boot choices.

 

So far I've tried openSuse (kde desktop), Ubuntu (gnome), Kali (gnome), Helix, and RedHat. Ext4 as filesystem, good. The latest gnome is good. KDE is good. Online updates, easy.

 

Try live-cd/usb first, remembering it will be much faster once installed.


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#4
Tatticky

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Oh, so the BIOS is stored in EEPROM on the motherboard? Makes sense; certainly it makes my life easier.

 

Running a VM on Windows would defeat the purpose of having Linux in the first place, though: not having to run Windows. I'd rather go the other way around, and run Windows in a VM on Linux. However, booting Linux off a flash drive sounds intriguing...

 

 

Setting up dual boot is easy these days. There is plenty of advice available .try linuxquestions.org for example.  Each distro will also have its own forum somewhere. With a Debian based system eg Ubuntu. Use gparted to partition the drive. Spend some time thinking about what sizes to make for two os's to suit. Set windows up first on the first partition. test various linux distros as live boots and when you have decided on one run its installation on the second partition. It'll set up itself nicely and set up the bootloader for dual-boot choices.

 

So far I've tried openSuse (kde desktop), Ubuntu (gnome), Kali (gnome), Helix, and RedHat. Ext4 as filesystem, good. The latest gnome is good. KDE is good. Online updates, easy.

 

Try live-cd/usb first, remembering it will be much faster once installed.

Okay then. So I just need to get windows installed, then I can work off of that.


Edited by Tatticky, 22 June 2014 - 06:18 PM.

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#5
old-fart

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Yes.

 

Either :

 

Install windows first.Then Install Linux letting it 'compact' the Windows installation to make room for Linux on a second partition.

 

Install windows first. Then use a partitioner like gparted to set up a second partition and install Linux there.

 

Use gparted to set two partitions up. Don't format them. Then install windows. Then install Linux.

 

In each case the bootoader (grub2 in these cases) will be set up by the distro and list windows as a boot choice.

 

If you have plenty of hd space, set up a third partition ( or more,take note of recommendations re primary, extended partitons ) for future work and/or as a store for use by windows and linux. You can also set up multi-boots (more than 2) which takes a bit more work in knowing terminal commands to configure the bootloader, but its all out there.


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#6
SpywareDr

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You can also run Windows in a VM on Linux.

 

http://downloadsquad...and-virtualbox/

 

http://www.howtogeek...tware-on-linux/

 

http://www.google.co...n a vm in linux


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