Jump to content

Welcome to Geeks to Go - Register now for FREE

Geeks To Go is a helpful hub, where thousands of volunteer geeks quickly serve friendly answers and support. Check out the forums and get free advice from the experts. Register now to gain access to all of our features, it's FREE and only takes one minute. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more.

Create Account How it Works
Photo

How can I tell WHAT is at fault please?

Monitor on the blink?

  • Please log in to reply

#1
Wrinkly Pete

Wrinkly Pete

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 152 posts

Hi,

 

I'm hoping someone out there can help me PLEASE.

 

Today I switched on my gaming PC (Chillblast Fusion Sidewinder - 2008/09  vintage, running Windows XP) and all was working fine until there was a "buzzing"  sound and the picture disappeared!

 

Coincidentally, I had moved the setup around (slightly) a couple of days ago to make more space. It has never liked being moved and I'm hoping the problem may be connected, maybe a broken cable or connection?

 

I suspect the cable linking the monitor to Desktop PC may be at fault, but is there any way of knowing?

 

Naturally, without a monitor, I could not "see" to close down the PC correctly and with great reluctance I had to just "switch it off". I HATE having to do that, but had NO choice.

 

Power is still reaching the monitor.

On a couple of attempts at restarting (after making adjustments) I even got a picture for a short while. The monitor is (mainly) just black except for the occasional flashing "Analog" "Digital" in top left hand corner of screen now.

 

It is also started showing a message (moving around the screen) saying "Check Signal cable".

 

I have tried using the other connection sockets on both the Desktop PC end and the Monitor end - with no success. As far as I'm aware, it has been the Digital connection that I've been using, not the Analog. But it's the same problem on both.

 

A couple of times I've got a graduated grey screen on the monitor. Also a sort of polka dot design/pattern filling the screen.

 

Without the monitor working it is VERY difficult to know what I can do, as I cannot enter any commands etc being unable to see to do so.

 

At one point I thought it had fixed itself. I got as far as the monitor showing that a disk check was being run on the start up, but I didn't get to "see" any result!

 

What should I do next? Buy a new cable (probably the cheapest option); buy a new monitor (when I may not need to), or is the fault likely to be whatever card the monitor connects to at the PC? 

When it first stopped working I could still hear the game running on the PC, I just couldn't see it, so I don't think the Desktop PC itself is the cause.

 

Am I missing something obvious?

 

I'd be very grateful for suggestions.

It's a great gaming machine and I really need to get it working, as many of my vast collection of programmes would not work on a newer PC or a later operating system, so I want to keep this one running.

 

You take a monitor SO much for granted. It's not until it plays up you realised you are stuffed without it!


  • 0

Advertisements


#2
donetao

donetao

    Banned

  • Banned
  • PipPipPip
  • 753 posts
At one point I thought it had fixed itself. I got as far as the monitor showing that a disk check was being run on the start up, but I didn't get to "see" any result!

 

This concerns me. This usually means a problem with the HD and could mean the HD has some bad sectors.

The cable would be the first source I would check. I'm sure you are aware that a TV can be used as a monitor, but you will need a cable for that also.

Make sure your video card is secure ;if you have a video card. If you have a on board video card(one attached to the mother board) you could try using it.

Others here on the forum might have better advise. If you post your make and model number, it will be easier to help you!

There can be other things causing this exp( Bad or loose connections where the cable plugs into the PC or monitor)

Do these look like your specs??

http://www.pcpro.co..../specifications


Edited by donetao, 26 June 2014 - 12:26 PM.

  • 0

#3
Wrinkly Pete

Wrinkly Pete

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 152 posts

 

At one point I thought it had fixed itself. I got as far as the monitor showing that a disk check was being run on the start up, but I didn't get to "see" any result!

 

This concerns me. This usually means a problem with the HD and could mean the HD has some bad sectors.

The cable would be the first source I would check. I'm sure you are aware that a TV can be used as a monitor, but you will need a cable for that also.

Make sure your video card is secure ;if you have a video card. If you have a on board video card(one attached to the mother board) you could try using it.

Others here on the forum might have better advise. If you post your make and model number, it will be easier to help you!

There can be other things causing this exp( Bad or loose connections where the cable plugs into the PC or monitor)

Do these look like your specs??

http://www.pcpro.co..../specifications

 

 

Hi donetao,

 

Yes, those look pretty familiar specs. They (Chillblast) altered a couple of components but the only relevent change was they used Corsair memory as there were supply problems at the time of construction.

I'm still in email contact with Chillblast and so far they seem to think the graphics card is the most likely to be causing the problem.

I've order a replacement PC to monitor cable - so I can swap and see if that's faulty. If it's not the cable my next preferred option would be substitute the monitor with one of my TVs. That said, I'd have to buy ANOTHER cable to achieve that!

I can see this being a long job!

 

WHY do you suspect the hard drive? Surely THAT wouldn't suddenly stop the monitor display?

If it was because of the hard drive check for errors...? THAT was probably because I had to stop the PC without the ability to see what was on screen. A "switch off at the plug" whilst the PC is running would surely be the most likely reason it checked the disk, wouldn't it?


Edited by Wrinkly Pete, 26 June 2014 - 12:49 PM.

  • 0

#4
donetao

donetao

    Banned

  • Banned
  • PipPipPip
  • 753 posts

WHY do you suspect the hard drive? Surely THAT wouldn't suddenly stop the monitor display?

If it was because of the hard drive check for errors...? THAT was probably because I had to stop the PC without the ability to see what was on screen. A "switch off at the plug" whilst the PC is running would surely be the most likely reason it checked the disk, wouldn't it?

 

Hi! Sorry!  Didn't mean to mislead you.No that would not cause the problems you are experiencing. I have never had my PC do A chkdsk unless I requested it, even after a hard shut down. This might be some thing you want to keep a eye on. I suppose it could have been caused by a hard shut down??? It sounds like your on top of your problem. You could Google and see how or if you have a option to use the on board graphics card before you purchase a new card!

A computer running Chkdsk during startup is probably not causing harm, but it could still be cause for alarm. This command-line utility also called Check Disk checks for and fixes file system issues on hard disk drives. While you or your information technology department can run the utility manually, certain system events and problems also trigger the utility, which runs at the next system reboot. Common automatic triggers for Check Disk are improper system shutdowns, failing hard drives and file system issues caused by malware infections.

 

PS I think you will need to go into the BIOS and change some options to use the on board card??? Not sure! Maybe another member will reply!

Hello Just found this! I don't know if it will work for you??

Shut the computer off, pull out the nice card, plug the monitor into the onboard video, boot to bios, enable onboard video, start windows


Edited by donetao, 26 June 2014 - 01:55 PM.

  • 0

#5
Wrinkly Pete

Wrinkly Pete

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 152 posts

 

WHY do you suspect the hard drive? Surely THAT wouldn't suddenly stop the monitor display?

If it was because of the hard drive check for errors...? THAT was probably because I had to stop the PC without the ability to see what was on screen. A "switch off at the plug" whilst the PC is running would surely be the most likely reason it checked the disk, wouldn't it?

 

Hi! Sorry!  Didn't mean to mislead you.No that would not cause the problems you are experiencing. I have never had my PC do A chkdsk unless I requested it, even after a hard shut down. This might be some thing you want to keep a eye on. I suppose it could have been caused by a hard shut down??? It sounds like your on top of your problem. You could Google and see how or if you have a option to use the on board graphics card before you purchase a new card!

A computer running Chkdsk during startup is probably not causing harm, but it could still be cause for alarm. This command-line utility also called Check Disk checks for and fixes file system issues on hard disk drives. While you or your information technology department can run the utility manually, certain system events and problems also trigger the utility, which runs at the next system reboot. Common automatic triggers for Check Disk are improper system shutdowns, failing hard drives and file system issues caused by malware infections.

 

PS I think you will need to go into the BIOS and change some options to use the on board card??? Not sure! Maybe another member will reply!

Hello Just found this! I don't know if it will work for you??

Shut the computer off, pull out the nice card, plug the monitor into the onboard video, boot to bios, enable onboard video, start windows

 

That's all beyond MY capabilities! I'm getting on in years and only self-taught when it comes to computers.

I'm really NOT technical. I may be an "Administrator" in "User Accounts", but that's ONLY because I now live alone and am an Administrator by default, I can assure you!  ;)

 

I'm pretty sure the hard drive's fine. I've had disc checks run before (on some of my other PCs) often after power cuts, or after unplugging the wrong thing on my 8 gang plug socket! (Going senile!)


  • 0

#6
donetao

donetao

    Banned

  • Banned
  • PipPipPip
  • 753 posts

Entering the BIOS is pretty basic computer knowledge. I'm also self taught and I'm 76 years old.

Good luck. Report back when you get your issue solved!

Just looking for some short cuts for you before you spend money on hardware you may not need! :headscratch:


  • 0

#7
Wrinkly Pete

Wrinkly Pete

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 152 posts

"Entering the BIOS is pretty basic computer knowledge".  :no:

 

As far as BIOS is concerned, it is one of those areas I do not wish to go (if at all possible). Just like registry editing, it's very easy to do a LOT of serious damage if you make any mistakes, rendering the computer unusable. I try to leave that to experts. It's NOT for the amateur. I am familiar with what CAN go wrong with these two areas, having had a Norton "Tech Support" guy totally mess up one of my PCs a few years back, and I do not want to go through that again. It was a nightmare.

 

I'll report back if I make any progress with my other avenues...


  • 0

#8
Wrinkly Pete

Wrinkly Pete

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 152 posts

Reporting back as I promised I would...

 

It turned out the problem was with my original graphics card [Chillblast Sapphire Radeon HD4870 512MB].

 

I ended up getting a new monitor, an ASUS VE247H , new cable, AND new graphics card in the end! The old monitor seems to work fine and I'll keep it as a spare; especially now I know how difficult it is to diagnose a fault without the use of a monitor to see what's happening!

 

I've replaced the old graphics card with an ASUS GTX 750 PHOC 1GD5 at the suggestion of Martin @ Chillblast.

 

It's a powerful card, using far less power than the old card. He talked me through installation (via email support) and I actually managed to get it working, eventually.

It's boosted my confidence quite a bit as well. I never thought I'd be doing open heart surgery on my dear old Chillblast!

 

Thanks to those at Geeks to Go (donetao) too.


  • 0

#9
donetao

donetao

    Banned

  • Banned
  • PipPipPip
  • 753 posts

Good Job!!

 

Attached Thumbnails

  • Capture510.jpg

  • 0






Similar Topics

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

As Featured On:

Microsoft Yahoo BBC MSN PC Magazine Washington Post HP