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Need help partitioning a new hdd


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#1
victoria_v23

victoria_v23

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I am installing a new second hard drive on an older computer and need help partitioning it. I am running Windows XP Prof. on the current drive and a few other programs like Norton AV. I want to use the new hard drive for just storing music and other media. The new drive is a Western Digital Caviar SE 80GB 7200 RPM 8MB Cache IDE Ultra ATA100. I am going to make this the slave drive, but don't know what kind of partition I should use when the XP wizard gives me the option of primary, logical, extended, basic, dynamic, etc. If it is just for storing media files, what is the best way to partition and how many partitions and what size? I could really use some help with this. :tazz:
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#2
mrwonka

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Hey Victoria,

Here are the easy facts:
Partitoning is done to restrict an OS from throwing files wherever it wants to.
And for a strict hardware difference between your files and the OS.
This allows for easier defrags, increased performance, and easier re-installs of OS.

Basic vs. Dynamic
Basic
- allows a user to make primary, extended and logical partitions
Dynamic
- allows a user to make simple, spanned, striped, mirrored, and RAID 5
volumes
- you can manage them without having to reboot windows
- usually used in servers

There is more to these, but in general you'll want to choose basic.

Primary vs. Extended vs. Logical
There is no difference in what these are except that they determine the number of partitions you'll have.

For windows you can have a max of 4 primary or 3 primary and an extended with unlimited logical partitions within the extended.

Example:
I want 7 partitions of any size:
Primary1 | Primary2 | Primary3 | Extended
|--> Logical4 | Logical5 | Logical6| Logical7

Most users will setup the HDD's for 3 partitions: OS | Programs | Music/Files

Since this is a backup HDD you can do what you want. Maybe split it up by a music, video, personal file partitions? Which would mean 3 primary partitions. Sizes are up to you as well.

Hope that helped.

Wonka
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#3
mrwonka

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Hey Victoria,

Here are the easy facts:
Partitoning is done to restrict an OS from throwing files wherever it wants to.
And for a strict hardware difference between your files and the OS.
This allows for easier defrags, increased performance, and easier re-installs of OS.

Basic vs. Dynamic
Basic
- allows a user to make primary, extended and logical partitions
Dynamic
- allows a user to make simple, spanned, striped, mirrored, and RAID 5
volumes
- you can manage them without having to reboot windows
- usually used in servers

There is more to these, but in general you'll want to choose basic.

Primary vs. Extended vs. Logical
There is no difference in what these are except that they determine the number of partitions you'll have.

For windows you can have a max of 4 primary or 3 primary and an extended with unlimited logical partitions within the extended.

Example:
I want 7 partitions of any size:
Primary1 | Primary2 | Primary3 | Extended
|--> Logical4 | Logical5 | Logical6| Logical7

Most users will setup the HDD's for 3 partitions: OS | Programs | Music/Files

Since this is a backup HDD you can do what you want. Maybe split it up by a music, video, personal file partitions? Which would mean 3 primary partitions. Sizes are up to you as well.

Hope that helped.

Wonka
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#4
victoria_v23

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Wonka-

Thank you, thank you, thank you! I know there is not one right way to do it, but I just needed some suggestions. If I divide the new/slave drive into two primary partitions (one for media and one for personal files), should I make a third primary one for backup? I read on another site that it's good to have a partition for backup. I don't know if it is the O.S. and programs from the master drive I should backup or files from the same drive, but another partition. If I added a partition at a later date, would it erase everything on the drive? Please bear with me...this is all new to me and I'm trying to learn. Thanks again for your reply. You've been a big help. :tazz:

-Victoria
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