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Windows 7 Not Booting Up After Windows Update Install


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#1
Webslinger64

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Computer was working fine this morning.  It notified me via a message window that there were two important updates to install via Windows Live Updates.  Both updates were important, nothing unusual about them.  After update, a restart was required.

Restarted computer and Windows 7 never launched.  It did get me to the logon screen.  I put in my password and the screen turns black with a mouse arrow in the middle that can be moved around like normal.

I rebooted the computer once and got a black screen with a message asking me where I wanted to boot from.  That was a surprise.

I was able to start the computer in safe mode and Windows 7 does start fully.  Tried to restart once again after that.  Got the logon screen, entered password and it just goes black.

Appreciate your assistance.

Thanks.


Edited by Webslinger64, 29 August 2014 - 02:27 PM.

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#2
Ztruker

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Boot to Safe Mode and do a System Restore to before you installed the updates.


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#3
Webslinger64

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Boot to Safe Mode and do a System Restore to before you installed the updates.

 

Thank you for the reply.  I ended up running a check disc for the C: drive and had it scan for and attempt recovery of bad sectors, and auto fix file system errors. The scan took forever, but once it was done everything seems to be fixed and working fine.   


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#4
Ztruker

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That's good news, thanks for posting it.


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#5
Webslinger64

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That's good news, thanks for posting it.

Well, I had 6 days worth of the computer running fine after I ran the Check Disc utility on C: drive.  This morning, I was having issues with the computer freezing up while on the Internet.  My browsers froze, curser froze and Word documents froze.  Used task manager to kill both and the computer was working fine again.  But after another hour of use, it did the same thing.  This time I shut it down and rebooted.  During reboot, Windows looks like it's going to start, but then I get a black screen with the message, "Launch Startup Repair (Recommende) and Start Windows Normally.  Tried the Startup Repair option and nothing happens.  I let it sit there for 30 minutes thinking Startup Repair was doing something, but nada.  Tried a reboot pressing F8 to get into the Safe Mode menu.  Selected Safe Mode, but after it begins the Safe Mode process, the computer ends up booting once again to the Launch Setup Repair message.  Help!


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#6
Ztruker

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You can try this, it should allow you to boot again. You will need a Windows 7 install DVD or flash drive.
 
Startup Repair Infinite Loop Recovery

 

If you do not have a Windows 7 installation DVD, or it's not up to the Service Pack level currently installed, you can download a legal copy with SP1 integrated from here:   

Windows 7 Direct Download Links  

Make sure you get the same version you have, Home Premium, Pro or Ultimate and 32 or 64 bit. Note that Basic or Starter is not available.

I recommend using ImgBurn at 4X speed (or the slowest available) to create the DVD from the downloaded .iso file. Just be careful during the install not to accidentally install some of the bundled junk that comes with it. Always take The Custom Install option.  

You can do this on any computer capable of burning a DVD.  

YOU MUST HAVE A VALID KEY TO INSTALL THIS .ISO.
The one on the COA sticker on your computer will work. 
If you are just using the Recovery Console you do not need a key.

You can also create a bootable USB Flash drive (4GB or larger) to install Windows 7 from.

  • Download and run Universal USB Installer  Easy as 1 2 3
  • Select Windows 7 from the first drop down list, all the way to the bottom
  • Select the downloaded Windows 7 iso file
  • Select your USB flash drive
  • Click Create

For techies or folks who work on computers:

Create Windows 7 Universal ISO With All Editions Selection On Install with ei.cfg Removal Utility.   

This will fit on a 6GB flash drive or can be burned to a DVD.


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#7
Webslinger64

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You can try this, it should allow you to boot again. You will need a Windows 7 install DVD or flash drive.
 
Startup Repair Infinite Loop Recovery

 

If you do not have a Windows 7 installation DVD, or it's not up to the Service Pack level currently installed, you can download a legal copy with SP1 integrated from here:   

Windows 7 Direct Download Links  

Make sure you get the same version you have, Home Premium, Pro or Ultimate and 32 or 64 bit. Note that Basic or Starter is not available.

I recommend using ImgBurn at 4X speed (or the slowest available) to create the DVD from the downloaded .iso file. Just be careful during the install not to accidentally install some of the bundled junk that comes with it. Always take The Custom Install option.  

You can do this on any computer capable of burning a DVD.  

YOU MUST HAVE A VALID KEY TO INSTALL THIS .ISO.
The one on the COA sticker on your computer will work. 
If you are just using the Recovery Console you do not need a key.

You can also create a bootable USB Flash drive (4GB or larger) to install Windows 7 from.

  • Download and run Universal USB Installer  Easy as 1 2 3
  • Select Windows 7 from the first drop down list, all the way to the bottom
  • Select the downloaded Windows 7 iso file
  • Select your USB flash drive
  • Click Create

For techies or folks who work on computers:

Create Windows 7 Universal ISO With All Editions Selection On Install with ei.cfg Removal Utility.   

This will fit on a 6GB flash drive or can be burned to a DVD.

Thank you for the reply.  I do have a Windows 7 Professional installation DVD.  Clicked on the Startup Repair Infinite Loop Recovery link you provided then clicked on System Recovery Options link to learn how to boot into the system recovery options in Windows 7.  

Turned on computer and booted into BIOS to change boot order to the DVD drive.  Inserted Windows 7 Professional Installation DVD and clicked on "Repair your computer" option.  This message came up:

 

"This version of System Recovery Options is not compatible with the version of Windows you are trying to repair.  Try using a recovery disc that is compatible with this version of Windows."

 

I do not understand why my Windows 7 Professional DVD installation disc would not work. 

 

So, I then clicked on the Windows 7 Direct Download Links you provided and tried to locate the correct download option for my version of Windows 7.  I am not sure which .iso option I should choose as there are multiple choices for Windows 7 Professional x64.  I do have DVD burning software, but have never burned an .iso image file before.  I am not even sure this is the recommendation you would make at this point.

Please advise.

Thanks. 


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#8
Ztruker

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You want this one:

 

Windows 7 Professional x64 SP1 U (media refresh) X17-59186.iso

 

as it includes SP1. Your;s almost surely does not have SP1 which is what triggered the  "not compatible" message.


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#9
Plastic Nev

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Edit to add, Ztruker beat me to it while I was cross checking things, however we both agree with the file number :D

 

Hi, your original disk will most likely be old enough to be before Windows 7 service pack 1 (SP1) hence why it refuses to work.

 

Indeed there is a proliferation of different downloads on that page and quite confusing as to which you need to download, so considering your original disk is Windows 7 Professional, are you sure it is the 64bit operating system?

 

If so and providing you want the English version you need to look down the list under "English (USA)" there is no such thing as English UK.

 

The one to choose is "Windows 7 Professional x64 SP1 U (media refresh)" with the download number X59186 ISO.

 

That is the latest and up to date version which should work with your current system.

 

If you download that file on to another Windows 7 computer that has a DVD burner fitted, insert a blank write once only DVD, (Not a RW) If the auto play box opens, dismiss it. All you should need to do next is just double click the downloaded file and windows own image burner will do the job for you, no need for third party software.

 

(Note, I have not burned that particular file that way, however it did create a bootable Windows PE disk for me so it should be OK)

 

Nev.


Edited by Plastic Nev, 08 September 2014 - 01:29 PM.

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#10
Plastic Nev

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As a new and separate post, if none of the above will work or even start a repair, there is a possibility that the hard drive has died. Let us know if that is the case as there is still plenty of options, including replacing the drive if indeed it is dead.

 

Nev.


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#11
Webslinger64

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You want this one:

 

Windows 7 Professional x64 SP1 U (media refresh) X17-59186.iso

 

as it includes SP1. Your;s almost surely does not have SP1 which is what triggered the  "not compatible" message

Well, I have no idea what caused it to work this time, but I read a post online over the weekend from someone that had a similar problem.  It was recommended that he try to Launch Startup Repair multiple times if it did not work at first.  Remember, when I tried launching mine I got a black screen for an hour. 

Tried launching it again today and I actually got to the System Restore screen, but there was no mouse arrow, nor could I use arrow keys to select options.  I rebooted and launched Startup Repair again.  This time there was a working mouse arrow.  I selected System Restore and in 3 minutes it was done.  Advised me to reboot, which I did, and all seems to be working fine once again.

I appreciate your efforts to assist me and apologize for wasting your time.  I do have one other question though.

The Windows Update from last week that seemed to have caused the problem in the first place, well my computer is already notifying me of new windows updates.  I am reluctant to allow it to update because I do not want to have this happen again.  Do you have any suggestions about that?

Thank you.


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#12
Webslinger64

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Edit to add, Ztruker beat me to it while I was cross checking things, however we both agree with the file number :D

 

Hi, your original disk will most likely be old enough to be before Windows 7 service pack 1 (SP1) hence why it refuses to work.

 

Indeed there is a proliferation of different downloads on that page and quite confusing as to which you need to download, so considering your original disk is Windows 7 Professional, are you sure it is the 64bit operating system?

 

If so and providing you want the English version you need to look down the list under "English (USA)" there is no such thing as English UK.

 

The one to choose is "Windows 7 Professional x64 SP1 U (media refresh)" with the download number X59186 ISO.

 

That is the latest and up to date version which should work with your current system.

 

If you download that file on to another Windows 7 computer that has a DVD burner fitted, insert a blank write once only DVD, (Not a RW) If the auto play box opens, dismiss it. All you should need to do next is just double click the downloaded file and windows own image burner will do the job for you, no need for third party software.

 

(Note, I have not burned that particular file that way, however it did create a bootable Windows PE disk for me so it should be OK)

 

Nev.

Thank you for the reply.  The problem appears to have been resolved without having to burn a DVD copy.  However, I am going to bookmark this thread and keep it for future use if I run into similar problems again.  :) :) :) :)


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#13
Plastic Nev

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Hi again, glad to hear it is now back up and running again, I just hope this isn't a precursor to the hard drive failing in the near future, so while it is running and if you have somewhere to back up to I recommend you do so.

 

As for the last question regarding the updates, if you have them set as manual, deselect all except one and try installing it, then check the system and that it will reboot. Do that with them all one at a time and you might be OK, I have heard of problems with multiple updates before and selecting one at a time seems to get round it.

 

Edit to add, I have just seen a notification that a recent Windows update has caused problems, mainly with program installations, however it may also be causing other as yet unknown problems, it is the update number KB2918614. Have a look at the list of offered updates, if that is one of them refuse it. You can also right click on it in the list and select "Hide this update" you won't then be pestered to install it.

 

Nev.


Edited by Plastic Nev, 08 September 2014 - 02:45 PM.

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#14
Webslinger64

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Hi again, glad to hear it is now back up and running again, I just hope this isn't a precursor to the hard drive failing in the near future, so while it is running and if you have somewhere to back up to I recommend you do so.

 

As for the last question regarding the updates, if you have them set as manual, deselect all except one and try installing it, then check the system and that it will reboot. Do that with them all one at a time and you might be OK, I have heard of problems with multiple updates before and selecting one at a time seems to get round it.

 

Edit to add, I have just seen a notification that a recent Windows update has caused problems, mainly with program installations, however it may also be causing other as yet unknown problems, it is the update number KB2918614. Have a look at the list of offered updates, if that is one of them refuse it. You can also right click on it in the list and select "Hide this update" you won't then be pestered to install it.

 

Nev.

Great advice and I will follow it for sure. 


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