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Mobo toasted? (solved)


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#76
khazarian

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 Notice the flaw in the image of the mobo 1156 socket I took yesterday. I can't begin repair operations until the jeweler's loupe arrives from ebay. You learn by observing the miscues of others. Are you watching all this?

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#77
terry1966

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wasn't having a go at you, everyone makes mistakes (made more than my fair share in my life. :rofl: ), just in my opinion it is sometimes better to recognise that fact early and eat the costs than try to fix things that may not be able to be fixed while causing more damage to the new parts when testing a fix.

 

personally even if you can straighten all those pins without breaking any there is still a good chance the motherboard is still fried and when you power it up it may well blow the new cpu too, it's your money tho so if your prepared to take the risks and costs then go ahead.

 

with any luck like you think the new cpu may work in it just fine or even if you find the motherboard doesn't work the cpu won't receive any damage during the testing so can be used in a new motherboard. :thumbsup:

 

:popcorn:


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#78
terry1966

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i thought you'd tested your old cpu in another motherboard but can't see where/if you said that now, so i'll keep my fingers crossed for you that when you straighten out those pins both the old cpu and motherboard work just fine. xthumbsup.gif.pagespeed.ic.7aXFW0A4z_.pn

 

:popcorn:


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#79
khazarian

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I don't have another mainboard just a new psu and that's what I tested. Didn't do any good. Pins must be repaired first so I got to give it a shot. Until they invent a mobo that repairs itself, it's all on me.

Edited by khazarian, 21 September 2014 - 01:26 PM.

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#80
terry1966

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Pins must be repaired first.

definitely, :D

 

just remember be very very careful, slow and easy is better than fast and broken.

gently ease them into place, shouldn't need any real force,

think i'd try and use a thin long flexible bit of plastic to ease them up and into line with the rest easier.

 

check every pin too, looks to me like you have a lot there that need straightening.

 

:popcorn:


Edited by terry1966, 21 September 2014 - 01:38 PM.

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#81
khazarian

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Thanks but I've already researched the correct tool to use. A drafter's mechanical lead pencil. Seems to be the tool of choice. I'm sure everything will check out ok. Afterall, how much bad luck can one have?

Edited by khazarian, 21 September 2014 - 09:07 PM.

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#82
khazarian

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If I could see 'em, I could fix 'em.. Loupe didn't work; too much distortion to be able to see the pins clearly. Maybe a hand-held magnifier glass with wider area and a bright light(LED?)?
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#83
iammykyl

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Yes, I found a jewels loop to strong, you have to have your nose on the board.   A + lens from an old pair of glasses works well.

You may find it hard lifting a bent pin to the upright position with a propelling pencil as the end is to big to push over the pin and also does not impart much sensitivity , if that make sense.   I have found a jewels screwdriver with a tiny flat blade end, allows you to see and feel what you are doing.   looked at the image, see comments. 

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#84
khazarian

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What does mistake mean? A broken pin???


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#85
Plastic Nev

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Might be my eyesight, but the photograph seems to be of the socket on the motherboard, if so it is the pin holes that the pins go into we are looking at, inside each one is a very thin plate with a slot in it that the CPU pin fits down. So if the slot has been strained too wide, the CPU pin cannot make a connection, even if the pin is straight.

If that is the case, there is no point trying to go further as it is near impossible to close that slot back up without doing further damage.

 

Nev.


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#86
khazarian

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Yeah it's an image of the mobo socket. The processor surface displayed discoloration so I discarded it.
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#87
khazarian

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What about sending the board to a repair shop?
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#88
Plastic Nev

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Hi, most motherboard construction is a fully automated process where all the components are fitted, usually by machine these days, then the whole board is dipped into a solder tank, or other even quicker, flow soldering technique is used again by machine.

Once completed it is an extremely difficult task to remove all the individual solder points for each of the socket connections in order to replace the socket, and would take well over two to three or more hours, a similar time to resolder the connections after fitting. No technician is likely to undertake that as the cost of his time will be more than the price of a new board, especially as there may well be other unknown problems with that motherboard.

 

For now, I would get a very strong magnifying glass and carefully inspect all the suspect pin hole connections and compare them with those you know to be good. The surface marks, may only be in the plastic surround which providing it isn't likely to block the pin hole, shouldn't be a worry. The important thing is those little metal strips and where they sit and whether the slot in the metal strip is looking too wide. A good strong and small magnifier glass should allow you to see all that.

 

Nev.

 

Nev.


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#89
khazarian

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The jeweler's loupe immediately leaps to mind and the feedback is deeply appreciated. I'll get to work on it tonight.
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#90
Plastic Nev

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Best of luck and hope the socket, and also the rest of the motherboard can be rescued. After all you were thinking of getting a new motherboard at one stage, so in one sense nothing is lost by trying to sort it out.

 

If you do manage to get the socket to accept the CPU with no problems, don't forget to apply some thermal compound to it before fitting the heat sink on top. There is an instruction for how to be sure of getting the compound right somewhere, but the usual advice is to start with no more than a small pea sized blob, too much can be as bad as not enough, as it can squeeze out and cause other problems on the board.

 

Nev.


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