Jump to content

Welcome to Geeks to Go - Register now for FREE

Geeks To Go is a helpful hub, where thousands of volunteer geeks quickly serve friendly answers and support. Check out the forums and get free advice from the experts. Register now to gain access to all of our features, it's FREE and only takes one minute. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more.

Create Account How it Works
Photo

Computer locking up [Solved]


  • This topic is locked This topic is locked

#76
mygrneyedangel

mygrneyedangel

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 67 posts

I used the disc for drivers. Did a system analysis and it gave me a list of things. Do you want me to post it?


  • 0

Advertisements


#77
DanoNH

DanoNH

    Trusted Helper

  • Malware Removal
  • 2,153 posts
Sure, if you like. Are you able to install drivers for the hardware components?
  • 0

#78
mygrneyedangel

mygrneyedangel

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 67 posts

It did a new install but think I got everything installed.


  • 0

#79
DanoNH

DanoNH

    Trusted Helper

  • Malware Removal
  • 2,153 posts

OK, so not a Repair Install but a New Install... 

 

Please answer these questions I have here and we will hopefully be able to wrap up if you're all set:

  1. Were you unable to perform the Repair Install, or did you just decide to do a Full one? 
  2. If you were unable to do the Repair Install, what did it tell you for a reason why?
  3. Was the previous version of Vista you had installed an official Dell one, or a third party/Retail version?
  4. Are you able to burn a CD without problems now?  If you're not sure, please test it out.
  5. Are there any hardware devices in Device Manager with small, yellow exclamation points on them?

  • 0

#80
mygrneyedangel

mygrneyedangel

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 67 posts

1. Didn't give me the choice to do a repair.

3.Official

4. Yes

5 Yes, biometric coprocessor.


  • 0

#81
mygrneyedangel

mygrneyedangel

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 67 posts

|
Application (8 files)
Audio (1 file)
BIOS (1 file)
Chipset (2 files)
Diagnostics (2 files)
Drivers for OS Deployment (5 files)
Modem/Communications (13 files)
Mouse, Keyboard & Input Devices (5 files)
Network (4 files)
Removable Storage (2 files)
Security (2 files)
Serial ATA (4 files)
Video (2 files)


Edited by mygrneyedangel, 09 October 2014 - 07:06 AM.

  • 0

#82
DanoNH

DanoNH

    Trusted Helper

  • Malware Removal
  • 2,153 posts

I've seen your last post, just waiting for approval on a response.  :)


  • 0

#83
mygrneyedangel

mygrneyedangel

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 67 posts

k


  • 0

#84
DanoNH

DanoNH

    Trusted Helper

  • Malware Removal
  • 2,153 posts

Hello, and thanks for waiting.  At this point your computer should be malware-free, and I've gone as far as I can.  If you'd like to clear up that yellow exclamation point, try installing the two packages in the Security (2 files) list. These should be UPEK TouchStrip Reader and UPEK TouchStrip Reader Driver. This will hopefully resolve that yellow triangle in Device Manager on the Biometric coprocessor.

Beyond this, if you need further assistance, you can request support in the Computer Hardware forum. :)

 

---------------------------------------

Now, let's cover some additional steps to clean up your computer and help you avoid getting infected again...

Step 1

Automatic Updates for Windows Vista

Another essential is to keep your computer updated with the latest operating system patches and security fixes. Windows Updates are constantly being revised to combat the newest hacks and threats, Microsoft releases security updates that help keep your computer from becoming vulnerable. It is best if you have these set to download automatically:

Turn ON Automatic Updates in Windows Vista



Step 2

Java Warning

Java is a popular point of entry to your computer for malicous programs. The United States Department of Homeland Security recommends that computer users disable Java.  Read more about it here and here.

Unless you need it to run important software the safest approach is to completely uninstall Java. Where you do require it then the next safest option is to disable it in your browsers until you need it, then enable it.

How to diasble Java in your web browser and How to unplug Java from the browser

If you do still need Java then regularly check that it is up to date. Older versions are the most vunerable to malicious attack.
 

  • Click Start>Control Panel>Add/Remove Programs.
  • Uninstall  all Java updates
  • Reboot your computer if prompted
  • Download Java for Windows.
  • Once downloaded, run the installer program, making sure to uncheck "Install the Ask Toolbar and make Ask my default search provider".  Disable any other optional software, settings or toolbars if offered.
  • Reboot your computer.


Step 3

Web Browser security

 

I strongly recommend using Mozilla Firefox:
 


Most malware is exploiting Internet Explorer's vulnerabilities, with Firefox you will be more secure.
Note: If you are going to use Firefox, I would suggest the use of these add-ons:
 

  • NoScript - for blocking ads and other potential website attacks.
  • McAfee SiteAdvisor - this tells you whether the sites you are about to visit are safe or not. A must if you do a lot of Googling.



Step 4

Other Program updates

If you use Adobe Reader, you should get the latest version of and keep it updated.  Best of all, its FREE:



  • Get Adobe Reader
  • Make sure to uncheck the check box labelled "Yes, install McAfee Security Scan Plus - optional", or any other optional "features".



Step 5

Anti Spyware

I recommend installing Malwarebytes Anti-Malware.  I would advise running this at least once a month.  If you need to download it, you can get it from here:

Malwarebytes Anti-Malware



Step 6


Personal Firewalls

Next let's look at Firewalls. These help to prevent unauthorized access both to and from the internet or your local network. A firewall is considered a first line of defense in protecting private information. Below are two free firewalls to choose from, if you do not already have one. Note: You only want to use one firewall your system.  

You can use the built-in Windows Vista Firewall, or use a third-party one, such as these:






Step 7

Anti Virus Programs

On to personal Anti Virus programs. One AV is a must have, but never more than one, as this can and will cause conflicts, system slow-downs, and false readings.

If you have a paid license to a good AV program, you can use that, or these FREE ones are as good as any paid subscription AV, as long as you allow them to update themselves:






Step 8

Instant Messengers

Almost done! If you like to use chat, MSN and Yahoo have vulnerabilities that can leave you open to infections. There are however a couple of very good, malware-free Instant Messenger programs which allow you to connect to multiple IM services in one program! (AOL, Yahoo, ICQ, IRC, MSN):






Step 9

File/System Cleaners

Finally, it is a good idea to clear out all your temp files every now and again. This will help keep your computer running optimally. It can detect registry errors, missing shortcuts, invalid files, etc. It also can assist in getting rid of files that may contain malicious code that could re-infect your computer.





Step 10

CryptoLocker Warning
 
CryptoLocker is a particularly nasty infection which is becoming more prevalent..
 
Go here for information about CryptoLocker Ransomeware. Learning about what is out there may help you prevent infection. The best protection against this infection is to backup your files often. If you're using an external drive, keep it unplugged from the computer when you're not backing up files or using it. This will prevent the infection from getting to your backed up files if you ever have the frustrating experience of contracting it.
 
It is suggested to Download CryptoPrevent, which is free for home use. It will help prevent CryptoLocker infection.



Further Reading

To find out more information about how you got infected in the first place and some great guidelines to follow to prevent future infections you can read this excellent article, originally written by Tony Klein, and updated by SpySentinel.

I will keep this log open for the next couple of days, so if you have any further problems, you can post another reply here.

OK, happy computing, and stay safe! :cool:


Please reply again to this thread to acknowledge you have read my last post.  If you have no further questions, this thread will be closed to prevent others from posting here.

Thanks!

 

 

 


  • 0

#85
mygrneyedangel

mygrneyedangel

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 67 posts
Thanks .
  • 0

Advertisements


#86
DanoNH

DanoNH

    Trusted Helper

  • Malware Removal
  • 2,153 posts

You are welcome.  Thanks to Essexboy as well!


  • 0

#87
Dakeyras

Dakeyras

    Anti-Malware Mammoth

  • Expert
  • 9,684 posts
Since this issue appears to be resolved ... this Topic has been closed. Glad we could help. :)

If you're the topic starter, and need this topic reopened, please contact a staff member with the address of the thread.

Everyone else please begin a New Topic.
  • 0

#88
Dakeyras

Dakeyras

    Anti-Malware Mammoth

  • Expert
  • 9,684 posts
Topic re-opened per OP's request...
  • 0

#89
mygrneyedangel

mygrneyedangel

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 67 posts
Installed noscript and it is messing with my websites. Also am getting a message that says... Javascript Disabled Detected You currently have javascript disabled. Several functions may not work. Please re-enable javascript to access full functionality. But when I look it tells me that it is enabled.
  • 0

#90
DanoNH

DanoNH

    Trusted Helper

  • Malware Removal
  • 2,153 posts

Regarding NoScript, the choice is yours whether to use it or not.  I use it on all of my Firefox installations (and portable ones too).  It is a tad inconvenient to use at first but the protection it offers is unparalleled.  It gets easier to use over time.
 
Visit this link to read a little "how to" article on NoScript. :)  NoScript will block JavaScript, even though the browser itself is set to use it, unless you approve the site the script is loading from.  Consider it is a filter that screens out what is allowed to get to your browser's web content processing core.
 
One setting I usually change is to Allow sites opened through bookmarks within the NoScript options (Type about:addons in the address bar, and then look for NoScript > Options):
NoScriptBookmarks_zpsd9629446.png
 
This makes it a bit easier to use I think.
 
You can disable the add-on in the same area, but I can't emphasize enough the power and protection that this add-on provides. 
 
There is an alternate approach to using NoScript, which is called Sandboxie.  It also has a learning curve, and I believe you have to remember to run your web browser within the "sandbox" but in essence it creates an isolated area for the web browser (or other application) which keeps it from infecting your computer if malware content were to be downloaded through or executed by it.
 
If you don't set it up to always keep your browser in the sandbox, I'm not certain, but its web protection purpose could be circumvented.
 
Here's the link:  Sandboxie

There's also a paid version.


  • 0






Similar Topics

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

As Featured On:

Microsoft Yahoo BBC MSN PC Magazine Washington Post HP