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New PC Build (BUILT)


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#1
Pete171

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I'm a first time custom builder.  I know a little about general CPU operation but almost nothing about any other hardware components.  The PC will be used for various tasks: some software development (LAMP stack and probably an Ubuntu Virtual Machine); some 3D modelling/rendering (hobbyist - so just amateur level stuff in Blender); and some gaming (both new and old releases).

 

I've decided on the components listed here: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/fB77yc

 

Purchasing all components from ebuyer.com - no shopping around - would cost c. £1450 GBP ($2268 USD).  I don't want to spend more than this; I'd rather be spending nearer £1000 GBP ($1564 USD).  Bottom line, though, spending up to £1450 is possible.

 

I'm hoping this build will last c. 7 years (as did the build I'm now 'retiring').

 

Please could anyone spare the time to review the chosen components and let me know if:

1 - They are compatible.

2 - There are any reasons why I should reconsider some (or all) of the components.

 

Any advice would be really appreciated.  :)

 

Pete


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#2
iammykyl

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:welcome: Pete171.

Nice selection of parts but may need balancing a bit, depending on it's use.

Please let use know if it's for gaming, photo/video/cad/music General workstation?   What aplications are being used?

 

Thanks.


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#3
Pete171

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Thanks for the reply! :)

 

I'll install Windows 8 on the SSD and will most frequently just be running a LAMP stack using XAMPP/WAMPP and listening to Spotify - nothing too taxing on the hardware.  Will occasionally work with Visual Studio and will probably run an Ubuntu Virtual Machine using VirtualBox.

 

I'd like to play new games with quick load times, high frame rates and high texture details etc.  Think Skyrim and Europa Universalis 4 for example.

 

I'll be working with Blender as a hobby (3D Modelling, animating and video editing).

 

Would like this build to last - i.e. I'd like it to be able to comfortably handle software released in 5+ years time.

 

Edit - I've just updated the build - please see here.  GTX 760 4GB changed to GTX 760 2GB.  16 GB DDR 4 reduced to 8 GB DDR4.  Mouse and keyboard removed.  New cost £1190 GBP ($1863 USD).  My main concern with the build now is: will the cooling be sufficient?


Edited by Pete171, 18 November 2014 - 06:40 AM.

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#4
iammykyl

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Thanks for the info and sorry for the delay, been a bit busy.

My comments are about the build and in now way a criticism of your capabilities.

Blender is the most demanding of your applications, at the moment, and as I see it, you are a enthusiast and not running mission critical production. System requirements, > http://en.wikipedia....re_requirements.

 

For your future modelling.   3D modelling with Pro software like AutoDesk often use an i5, but a Pro GPU, Quadro.   This is where you are making a compromise as you want to play games, hence the upgrade to a GTX 970 for the increased Cuda cores against the GTX 760.  ie. > http://usa.autodesk....=8192&system=98

GPU, 760 to 970 > https://developer.nvidia.com/cuda-gpus

XAMPP/WAMPP.   I assume you will be using as a local/host and not an actual server.   System requirements are minimal.   will you Dual Boot Windows/Linux?

I think the LGA2011-3 platform is overkill and the money is best spent elsewhere in the system.

 

RAM.   Stay with 16GB as for many applications more is better, also if you upgrade later, it is no longer a matched kit and no guarantee they are compatible, even from the same manufacturer. 

 

Drives.   I consider a 120GB SSD to small.   It is not the capacity you end up with as some iss taken by the SSD for management, firmware and over provisioning + OS installation drive partitioning. 

250GB SSD, OS/applications.

1 HDD, Data storage, project source files.

1 HDD, scratch/cache, (where software allows) + rendered finished projects.

 

PSU. The Corsair CX600 is the low end Builder Series and I recommend supporting your other quality parts with something better, one listed comes with a 10 warranty.

 

MB, recommend the Asrock Extreme6, excellent board just used in my new build.

 

Case, very nice.   I would install another fan as it only comes with 2 pre installed.

 

Please consider this build > http://uk.pcpartpicker.com/p/Y2Dgqs  £1222.73

 

Just seen your edit.

A single stick of RAM is dodgy, better with two, if one fails, you still have a working rig.

The cooler will be fine, but add another case fan.

Don't like any TIM that contains electrically conductive materials, seen even experienced builder who have caused shorts. 

GPU. cards with 4GB of vRAM will perform much better when rendering and with large or multi monitors.  


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#5
Pete171

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Thank you very much for your help!

 

I've just ordered this build.  The actual cost was £1324.39 in the end.

 

Thanks again :)


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#6
iammykyl

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You are most welcome Pete171.

I am sure you will be very happy with the performance.   Was going to give you a rocket for omiting the MB speaker but see there is one included with the case.

The stock cooler comes with pre applied TIM in the form of a pad.   Before using your own, all traces of it must be removed.   http://www.ebay.co.u...L-/271019176623

Boots used to sell it, or a decent chemists can order it for you.

 

Tips.   Always turn of the PSU when workng on the computer and take anti static measures, even when just handling parts.

Video, CPU install. > http://www.intel.com...wapkw=cs-034816

If you need any help at all, we are here.

 

Please let us know how the build goes and performance as this is most useful for other DIY builders.


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#7
Pete171

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Built. :)

 

Boot times - BIOS: c. 9 seconds.  Windows 8: c. 3 seconds.  So from power on c. 12 seconds until the computer is ready to use.  Shut down takes c. 3 seconds.

 

Performance - Have run Skyrim (with max settings) and Blender (simple 3D modelling, no large poly-counts or large renders yet).  So far the performance has been excellent.

 

Building - I'd never assembled a PC before so it took me a long time (10 hours).  For anyone who may be interested, here is how I found the build:

 

I had read that attaching the motherboard to the case and inserting the processor was often the hardest part of the build but I found this relatively easy (it was useful to search on YouTube for e.g. "lga 1150 cpu installation" to see videos of the process).  Installing the video card to the PCI-E slot was difficult: I could insert it into the slot but it was hard to get the ports at the back of the video card lined up with the holes in the case correctly.  Attaching all the PSU cables and the small connectors from the case to the motherboard (power button reset button, fan power, LEDs etc) was very difficult.  Cable management was also something I didn't really consider until everything was already plugged in and working.  Even now my cabling is a bit of a mess.  If I were to repeat the build I would:

 

1 - Attach the connectors from the case to the motherboard as soon as the motherboard and processor had been installed (i.e. in particular before installing the GPU, PSU and SATA devices; these got in the way and made plugging in the small 1-pin connectors much harder).

2 - Install the GPU last.  This was a large GPU that made attaching some of the SATA cables to the motherboard impossible without removing the GPU first.

 

When testing the build for the first time I got a few simple BIOS errors (motherboard ASROCK Z97 EXTREME6).  The manual describes all the 'Dr. Debug' codes and what they mean.  The first error was because I didn't have a mouse/keyboard plugged in.  Then it reported a PCI-E slot problem - this was just because I hadn't connected the GPU to my monitor.  Then it was a boot device error but I just needed to install the OS from a USB flash drive at this point.

 

I learned a lot from doing this.  It was daunting but ultimately very worthwhile.

 

Thanks again for the great advice, iammykyl.


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#8
iammykyl

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Thank you so much for taking the time to give your feedback, it will be useful to other first time builders.

I see you did find the hard parts, front case headers and GPU, (always goes in last).

When you get some time, tidy up your cabling, can make quite a difference to cooling.

 

Tips.

Install Malwarebytes, (a on demand scanner)

Visit the Asrock site, Update everything possible.

Check that Trim is enabled for the SSD, and never defrag it.

Would you like to move Data files like My Docs to the HDD?


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