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What's your favorite distro, and why?


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#16
Romattman

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CubLinux is the way to go. Installed on a cheap chromebook. Works great and does everything any other distro can do. I also have Cublinux installed on an old 64-bit deskstop which is dual booted to Kodi on an external drive ..... love it.  :D


Edited by Romattman, 22 August 2016 - 10:53 AM.

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#17
Rikai

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I've got to change my answer since I last posted. I've switched to Fedora and love it. I currently use it for my Ansible testing grounds as well as my main Linux server. I like how up to date all the packages are and the ability to upgrade the kernel without having to restart.


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#18
flyboy1565

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My daily drive/programming virtual machine is a Linux Mint. I also have a Arch, Ubuntu, Debian, Opensuse, Fedora, Puppy.

 

I really like ChaletOS, its clean and well designed. 

 

Waiting for Papyros to mature.

 

http://papyros.io/


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#19
trucker

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Linux Mint has worked out well for me. As of late I've been  working on PC-BSD.  I really like the way it feels to. If I can work threw the printer and scanner setup i may move to it for good.


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#20
HolyCowZ

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I like Debian, Unbuntu and Mint and have been playing with a new one called Penu which is a lot more like windows to use.


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#21
terry1966

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which is a lot more like windows to use.

i'm always curious when i see people say that about a linux os, just how is it more like windows to use?

 

far as i'm concerned every linux os i've used is exactly like windows to use.

i just move mouse and click, exactly the same as in windows.  :D 

 

:popcorn:


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#22
Rikai

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which is a lot more like windows to use.

i'm always curious when i see people say that about a linux os, just how is it more like windows to use?

 

far as i'm concerned every linux os i've used is exactly like windows to use.

i just move mouse and click, exactly the same as in windows.  :D

 

:popcorn:

 

 

What's wrong with good ol' CLI?


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#23
terry1966

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nothing but why use it when you don't need to?

 

i use a remote control for my linux media pvr, and i mostly use the mouse for on my daily pc.

there's nothing i usually do on either that requires me to use the command line.

 

when setup i just need to click on the program i want to use and away i go, simple and straight forward.

that's why in actual daily use linux is no different to windows in my opinion. just click on the programs you want to use and away you go.

 

the terminal is great and i use it to do lots of things, but once everything is installed and setup how i like then i rarely use it at all. 

in fact besides doing updates i can't remember what i used it for last.

 

only drawback with using cli for me is i don't use it regularly, so i never remember the commands and syntax so need to go look them up again for most things.

 

when i first started using computers there was really nothing except cli and keyboard, no mouse, no hard drives. etc. etc. ;)

 

:popcorn:


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#24
HolyCowZ

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i just move mouse and click, exactly the same as in windows.   :D

 

 

LOL Linux is very different to windows you have to type commands to install and run programs. Windows you just click.

Put any person who has never used linux on it and they would struggle. (btw I'm not up for an argument lol)

 


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#25
terry1966

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LOL Linux is very different to windows you have to type commands to install and run programs. Windows you just click.

Put any person who has never used linux on it and they would struggle. (btw I'm not up for an argument lol)

 

yes linux is different to windows but no idea why you think that holycowz, because no you don't always have to use command line to install or run things, like everything to do with computers there are usually always more than one way to do most things.

 

in fact at the moment i can't think of a single program i use regularly where i used the command line to install or run it, firefox, handbrake, vlc, virtualbox, etc. etc. were all installed or run by using only the mouse.

 

any person can sit in front of my setups and use them without any problems at all and never need to use the command line once. don't forget we're talking about "using" the os and not "setting it up"

 

i've used linux for at least 10 years and in fact i don't even have a windows pc in my home, yet my guests never use the cli and can always use my pc's without issues to do what they want like get on the web or check emails etc. etc. using just the mouse.

they also love using my mythtv pvr setup to watch videos and record or watch tv programs using just the remote.

 

so that's why my initial query to you about how penu was "more like windows to use" than any other linux os. and my opinion that they are all the same to me. by the way i use opensuse 64bit leap42.

 

I like Debian, Unbuntu and Mint and have been playing with a new one called Penu which is a lot more like windows to use.

 

i'm always curious when i see people say that about a linux os, just how is it more like windows to use?

 

far as i'm concerned every linux os i've used is exactly like windows to use.

i just move mouse and click, exactly the same as in windows. 

 

:popcorn:

 

at the moment i'm watching netflix on one monitor/tv while writing this post on the other and i never needed to use the cli once. :D

 

:popcorn:


Edited by terry1966, 21 October 2016 - 08:23 PM.

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#26
Krockz1993

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Arch with i3 WM..... :)


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#27
mrjimphelps

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Sounds interesting.  I like the idea of having the choice of what DE you want to use, when installing.  Had Ubuntu shipped with that option, it would have rendered so many forks not necessary.

Xubuntu ships with the xfce interface.  I didn't dig around too much on the Ubuntu site, but I wouldn't be surprised if other variants of Ubuntu had other interfaces available.

 

Mint has a few available.


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#28
mrjimphelps

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I have used Ubuntu, Lubuntu, Xubuntu, Puppy, and Mint. I decided on Mint with the xfce interface.

 

Mint has a solid, polished feel.  It is fast, and it works really well.

 

Ubuntu: I didn't like the interface.

Lubuntu: had some rough edges.

Xubuntu: had a few rough edges.  Sometimes crashed my computer.

Puppy:  crashed a lot.


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