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Upgrade Main Hard Drive But Keep Data.


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#1
Foxman318

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I currently have a partitoned Hard Drive that is broken down into the following:

18GB (Recovery Partition)

100MB (system, Active, Primary Partition)

288GB (Boot, Page File, Crash Dump, Primary Partition) = This appears as C: drive

289GB (Primary Partition) = This appears as a seperate E: drive.

I have no Win 7 Cds, only the recovery partion.

 

I wish to purchase a larger Hard Drive but somehow mirror all the partions.

Am I asking to much as:

A. A larger HD will be greater than the sum of the current HD = Issues?

B. Does software exist for the task?

C. A created mirror would have to be held on a seperate HD larger in volumn than the main HD?

 

Would it be an easier (albiet a more expensive) option to backup data to seperate HD, purchase a new larger main HD + Win 7 Disk and rebuild new HD.

 

Any direction is appreciated.

 


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#2
Kemasa

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Drive manufacturers often provide software to copy the existing data to the new drive, which is the easy way.

 

One issue could be that it looks like all of the primary partitions are in use, which can be an issue in using the additional space. What do you want to do with the additional space? Do you want an additional partition or expand an existing partition (the last partition can be expanded).

 

There are tools in Knoppix which can expand an existing partition or copying a partition, but knowing what exactly to do can be an issue. If you can have both drives in the computer, then you could just use the second drive for additional space.


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#3
Foxman318

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The C: Drive partition holds all my progs/apps/games (almost full).

The E: Drive partiton mainly holds pictures and misc stuff and is about half full (addtional space).

Can you expand the C: element thus reducing the E: element?

Getting rid of E: Drive partiton and only having C: Drive would provide more free space but is this possible without wiping out data.


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#4
Kemasa

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It can be done, but it is a bit more difficult. You would have to backup the data on the E: drive. You can not just merge it with the C: drive.

 

If there is nothing pointing to the data on the E: drive, then you could add an additional disk and move all the data there, then expand the C: drive.

 

The harder, but better, way is to get a larger drive and copy all of the data to the new drive, then you have a backup of all of the data on the old drive. Then either delete the E: drive on the new drive and expand the C: drive, then create a new E: drive and copy the data there or the other way is to create a new partition on the new drive at the end of the disk to move/copy the E: drive data to and then expand the C: partition.

 

Knoppix has qtparted, which allows you to resize a partition, but you should have a backup of the data in case things go wrong. The problem is that if you don't have any experience with Linux, it might be a bit of a learning curve. I think that there might be a program that you can buy that will allow you to expand partitions, but I am not sure of what it is since I use Linux and I am familiar with the tools there.


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#5
Foxman318

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Ultimately I think I will need a bigger hard drive. If I chose to rebuild a new HD, could I copy across the "Recovery" partition or is it simpler to buy a Win 7 CD.


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#6
Plastic Nev

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Hi, being more Windows oriented I may be able to help here.

As well as the new drive you will also need a means of connecting it to the computer with the existing drive still in it.

 

You then download and install on the existing computer and drive a free program called Macrium Reflect. You then use Macrium Reflect to create a clone of the existing system onto the new hard drive.

 

Once the clone is on the new hard drive it is just a simple matter of remove the old drive and fit the new one in its place.

The computer will boot up and run just as it did before.

 

You can then expand the last partition into the empty space.

Rather than the Windows own partition program, which is basic at best, you can install and use a third party Partition making and moving software, there are quite a few. I personally use EasUS Partition Master.

 

So here is how you do it, as well as the new drive, you need a means of connecting it to the computer to put the clone onto it, I would recommend obtaining an enclosure, they are not too expensive, and once it has been used for making the clone, the now spare small old drive can be fitted to make it useful as an external storage device.

Just for example here is an enclosure case, you may find cheaper deals elsewhere.

 

http://www.pcworld.c...300678-pdt.html

 

The next thing you need is to download and install Macrium Reflect, from here

 

http://www.macrium.c...eflectfree.aspx

 

If you use the download link supplied, be aware that there may be other junk offered during the install process, where offered a custom install, use it so as to remove ticks for things like tool bars so called free security scans etc. Read carefully every page and window that opens during the installation to be sure you don't include unwanted junk.

 

Once Macrium is installed, and the new hard drive fitted to the enclosure, connect the hard drive and enclosure to the computer and then open Macrium Reflect, you should see the existing hard drive © and (E) partitions included, click on the "Clone this drive", and then navigate to the new drive as the destination, making a clone is quite easy and a lot is self explanatory.

 

It may take a couple of hours to make the clone, depending on how much data you have on the existing drive. Just let it get on with it till it completes.

 

As said earlier, all you need to do next is shut everything down, Computer and enclosure, then disconnect the enclosure and remove the new drive, then swap it for the existing old drive.

If at that point the computer refuses to boot, it may be because your computer has UEFI with secure boot enabled. Let us know if that happens.

However if an older computer it may not have UEFI so all should boot up OK.

 

Once everything is up and running, do take note of the advice to back up the (E) drive as a just in case, also you already have the original smaller drive to rely on as well.

 

Next is to download and install the EasUS Partition Master if you wish to try using that instead of Windows own partition manager, you can download it from here

 

http://www.partition...om/personal.htm

 

I give the same warning to watch out for and stop unwanted extra's during installation and download.

 

See how you get on and any problems don't try going further, just ask and we can help sort them out.

 

A quick edit.  You haven't said if the computer is a desktop or laptop, if a laptop you will need a 2.5 inch drive as the new drive, if a desktop it is likely to be a 3.5 inch drive, you need to be sure of that for getting the right enclosure, as well as the fitting it to the computer after making the clone on it.

 

Nev.


Edited by Plastic Nev, 25 December 2014 - 02:31 PM.

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#7
Foxman318

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Many thanks Plastic Nev for the information.

I have a PC which may also have a free Hard drive slot on the cable.

If this is the case, could I just purchase a new larger HD, connect and then use Macrium Reflect to create the clone from old C: Drive to the new HD?

With regard to partions, is it possible to enlarge the C: Partiton rather than the E: Partition?


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#8
Plastic Nev

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Are the hard drives IDE, with the broad multi wire cable between or are they the newer SATA with the small data and power cables?

 

With EasUS, there is a bit of work involved, however the answer is yes, it means moving first the (E) partition into the unallocated space first to make a gap between the © and the (E), then expand the © into it.

If you look around there are plenty of tutorials for doing various things with EasUS partition manager.

 

Nev.


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#9
Foxman318

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My PC has SATA Hard drives. Does this make HD to HD easier?


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#10
Plastic Nev

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Yes, if the motherboard has a spare SATA connection or port on it, you only need a cable and a spare power connector rather than buying an enclosure for USB connection.

With SATA, there is no master or slave business as there used to be with the older IDE systems

 

However, if there is no spare SATA connection, you will have to go the enclosure route. You cannot double up on one SATA connection.

 

Nev.


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#11
Foxman318

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Many thanks for your direction Nev.

 

Regards

 

Chris.


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#12
terry1966

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should be quite a simple process using macrium reflect.

just clone each partition to the new hard drive 1 at a time,

resizing each partition after cloning to what you want before continuing and cloning the next partition from the old hard drive.

 

full guide here. :- http://kb.macrium.co...ticle50081.aspx

 

you can then either keep that old hard drive as it is for a backup drive or delete all the partitions (except the recovery partition) and use the freed space for backups.

 

:popcorn:

 

not forgetting with both hard drives installed in your pc now you'd have to go into bios/uefi and change the boot order of the hard drives so the new one boots first, otherwise even tho everything is cloned to the new hard drive when you start up your pc it will still boot to the old drive with it's operating system and partition setup.


Edited by terry1966, 26 December 2014 - 04:26 PM.

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#13
Foxman318

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Thanks Terry, appreciate the information.

 

Chris.


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