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Please help any advice apprecatied (Resolved)

system build new build first time

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#46
phillpower2

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Cover your bases and ask Intel customer support, contact details here

 

The warranty details are somewhat vague but I did notice the info below that I have highlighted in red;

 

LIMITED WARRANTY

If you are a consumer under the Australian Consumer Law, this warranty does not apply to you. Please visit http://www.intel.com/support/ processors/sb/CS-009862.htm to view the limited warranty which is applicable to Australian consumers.

Intel warrants to the purchaser of the Product (defined herein as the boxed Intel® processor and the accompanying thermal solution) in its original sealed packaging

 

You are welcome btw Jerod  :)


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#47
jerodmichael

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I see that very tricky I will go ahead an give them a call and see what they have to say because If I do decide to overclock which Im gonna do since I bought the protection plan im gonna need a better cooling unit


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#48
jerodmichael

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I went ahead and went of live chat with them they said It was ok with that plan :yeah:

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#49
phillpower2

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That is good news for you  :)

 

Some light reading for you here

 

NB: Worth mentioning is that Alberto made a point of saying "with that plan it will be covered" so the same does not apply to the standard Intel 3 year CPU warranty.


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#50
terry1966

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:thumbsup:

 

regardless of all the warnings phil gives on the aftermarket cooler, it really is a non issue even without buying the extra overclocking insurance, just don't do any overclocking until you do get the new cooler fitted tho. ;)

 

:popcorn:


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#51
phillpower2

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terry,

 

Can you please support your statements by backing it up with fact.


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#52
terry1966

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of course, what would you like, 1 or a dozen topics where people have rma'd an intel cpu where they state they use after market coolers and intel never even asked if they used an after market cooler during the rma process?

 

here's 1 i found straight away, from only a couple of months ago too. :rofl:  :- 

 

So long as you don't do something like physically beat the CPU to death with a hammer I don't expect you would have any issues replacing it under warranty. When I had to replace my i5 I didn't mention I was using an aftermarket cooler & they didn't ask.

http://setiathome.be...ad.php?id=75946

 

:popcorn:

 

found this topic where the exact same conversation we have about stock coolers took place. 

http://www.sysnative...pu-coolers.html

 

:rofl:

 

you keep warning people and i'll keep telling them not to worry, that way we can both be happy and the op can decide for themselves who to believe. ;)


Edited by terry1966, 28 January 2015 - 04:10 PM.

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#53
terry1966

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FWIW here's a detailed reply on intel cpu temps and how they work, notice the shutdown temp for the i7 4670k, even higher than i thought.

 

 

Standard Ambient = 22C
Tcase (CPU Temp) = 72C
CPU / Core Offset + 5C
Tjunction (Core Temp) = 77C
Tj Max (Shutdown Temp) = 105C

 

full text.

 

What type cooler are you using? At what Ambient temperature are you testing? Which Prime95 test are you running?

Intel's Thermal Specification - http://ark.intel.com...ore-i5-4670K... - for your i7 4670K is 72C, however, the technical definition of their specification is very complicated, so I'll break it down for you.

There are 5 thermal sensors in a 4 core processor; a single Analog sensor (CPU temperature) and 4 individual Digital sensors (Core temperatures).

The temperature shown in Intel's specification, (Tcase), is measured on the surface of the Integrated Heat Spreader (IHS) under tightly controlled laboratory conditions at 22C Standard Ambient (intake temperature). For lab testing only, a groove is cut into the surface of the IHS where a thermocouple is embedded at the center. The stock cooler is attached, and a steady-state 100% workload is applied, (such as Prime95 Small FFT's). Thermal saturation is reached within 10 minutes.

Since there is no thermocouple on any processors outside Intel's labs in the wholesale or retail outlets, a single Analog Thermal Diode is instead used to "emulate" a thermocouple. This single analog sensor is located in the center of the lower layers of the processor package and is called "CPU" temperature, which is the equivalent of "Tcase".

The analog value is converted to digital (A to D) by the Super I/O (Input / Output) chip on the motherboard, then is calibrated to look-up tables coded into BIOS, which are all too often inaccurate. This is the temperature you see in BIOS and in monitoring utilities such as AI suite II, which are provided by motherboard manufacturers.

"Core" temperature, also called "Tjunction", is measured at the heat source by an individual Digital Thermal Sensor (DTS) for each Core, which are factory calibrated. Since the CPU sensor is not in relatively close proximity to the heat source, there is ~5C thermal gradient or "offset" between "Core" temperature and "CPU" temperature during Prime95 Small FFT's.

This means that Intel's "CPU" temperature (Tcase specification) runs ~5C less than "Core" temperatures. More correctly, since there is always some temperature sensor discrepancies between Cores, "average" Core temperature is most important. So if Prime95 Small FFT's is run for 10 minutes at 22C Ambient, then the average Core temperature is ~77C.

Standard Ambient = 22C
Tcase (CPU Temp) = 72C
CPU / Core Offset + 5C
Tjunction (Core Temp) = 77C
Tj Max (Shutdown Temp) = 105C

Tj Max is Intel's Thermal Specification which defines the "Core" temperature at which the processor will shutdown. Excessive heat kills electronics. Most folks in the overclocking community will agree that any sustained temperatures greater than 75'ish are just too hot for a 12 hour stability test or for processor longevity.

Bottom line? Your Core temperatures are within Intel's specs. You're OK up to 75'ish, but remember that when running Prime95 Small FFT's, if you're testing below or above 22C Standard Ambient, then you need to add or subtract the difference so that your test results are corrected to Intel's standards. This way you eliminate variables, and your results will always be consistent and repeatable.

Some additional thoughts to keep in mind - Thermal Testing:

Prime95 Small FFT's is the standard for processor thermal testing, because it's a steady-state 100% workload. This is the test that Real Temp uses to test sensor movement. Prime95's default test, Blend, is a cyclic workload for testing memory stability, and is not suitable for thermal testing. Other tests such as IBT (Intel Burn Test) have segments which flood all registers with all one's, which is the equivalent of a 110% workload. While suitable for stability testing, IBT is uncharacteristic of real-world maximum loads. You can see for yourself by using the "Graphs" in SpeedFan to illustrate and compare how these tests create different thermal behaviors. On air cooling, thermal saturation is typically reached within 10 minutes, however on liquid cooling, saturation may require up to 30 minutes.

I hope this answers any questions you may have about processor temperatures.

Comp sol.gif
 

http://www.tomshardw...core-4670k.html

 

:popcorn:


Edited by terry1966, 28 January 2015 - 04:38 PM.

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#54
phillpower2

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I agree that people should make their own decision but it should be based on fact not hearsay post on third party forums, Intel is not particularly helpful as their warranty is vague but AMDs warranty terms are crystal clear;

 

AMD;
This Limited Warranty shall be null and void if the AMD microprocessor which is the subject of this Limited Warranty is used with any heatsink/fan other than the one provided herewith.
 
 
Advising members to disregard any warranty terms is not good practice but it is even less advisable when you are dealing with a $280 processor. 

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#55
terry1966

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:rofl:

 

fact is fact phil.

 

people rma intel cpu's everyday without any questions or issues about using a 3rd party cooler, whether you like to believe it or not.

 

as to the amd warranty, that's a different case because as you state it does actually mention after market heatsinks in it, but then again they do have better heatsinks to start with. ;)

 

 

you keep warning people and i'll keep telling them not to worry, that way we can both be happy and the op can decide for themselves who to believe. ;)

:thumbsup:

 

:popcorn:


Edited by terry1966, 28 January 2015 - 04:32 PM.

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#56
phillpower2

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Can't disagree with you on the RMA info but apparently it can be hit and miss on occasion as sometimes Intel can ask for the serial number off the stock cooler as well as the CPU.


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