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I have a question about installing software and other

Software using linux

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#1
Marchalla

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My question is how do I install software by opening a terminal and using certain types of commands? My problem is that it requires a couple of things and I need to know more about it. The command line and sudo commands, also the part about a password I'm working on. I need to get these down before I can use this way of installing a program.


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#2
terry1966

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what distro are you using and what software do you want to install?

 

there are a number of different commands you could use depending on distro,

does it use debs or rpms? where are you getting the software from, is it in an installed repo or do you need to get it from the internet?

 

eg to install firefox in ubuntu from an installed repo.

sudo apt-get install firefox

to install firefox in suse after su to root, also from an installed repo.

zypper install firefox

if you need to download the packages first, then you'd probably use the wget command but there are others you can use like curl.

 

the best place to learn usually is in the documentation of your distro but here are a few links you could find helpful.

 

http://lowfatlinux.com/

http://linux-bible.com/

 

:popcorn:

 

My problem is that it requires a couple of things and I need to know more about it.

i take it by this you mean you've tried to install some software but found it needs some dependent packages installed first before it will work?

 

this is where i search for and get any missing packages i may need to install :- http://software.opensuse.org/132/en

 

near the top where it says package search and you see the green search button by the side of that click on the spanner to select your distro (not all distros are listed so you'll need to know a compatible distro to the one your using.) then type or paste in the package your missing and hit the search button.

 

also the part about a password I'm working on.

not sure exactly what you mean by this but when you install a distro you are either asked to create and enter a user password and a root password or just a root user password, it is the root password or user password (if that's all you created.) that you need to use to install software when asked for one.


Edited by terry1966, 23 April 2015 - 06:31 AM.

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#3
Marchalla

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Okay sure I have Mint 12 Lisa freshly installed. It has a deb installer for software which is new to me. The PC I just got and it has a new OS and I've never really tried Linux. I think I have down the user name and that part is simple. Could you tell me more about the root password such as is it important in the different ways of using command lines? Is the root password the part where I can begin the basics of better using this system? Just want to add I'm finding very useful the links that were just provided. This may solve any issues for now.


Edited by Marchalla, 23 April 2015 - 04:53 AM.

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#4
terry1966

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root is like an administrator in windows.

 

in linux you'll find you can not make any system changes without first becoming root or a superuser and being asked for a password. the password it expects you to enter is one you created when you installed the distro.

 

some distro's by default you need to enter 2 passwords, a user password and a root password during install, other distro's you only need to enter a user password during install which it then uses to become a superuser and gain roots powers to change things.

 

sudo is the command that lets you stop being a normal user with the limited permissions that entails and lets you become a superuser that can change anything in the os.

 

more about what root is and the way sudo works here :- https://help.ubuntu....munity/RootSudo

 

mint is a derivative of ubuntu so you'll find any documentation that shows how to do something in ubuntu will also usually apply in mint and vice versa.

 

you'll find once you've setup your system and installed everything you want/need then you'll rarely need sudo permissions so will never be asked or need to enter the password during everyday use, if you are asked for it make sure you know what needs it and why, is it something your doing or who knows one day it may be because some new malware is trying to install itself on your machine (never heard of such a case yet on linux tho. but like i said one day who knows. :D ).

 

:popcorn:


Edited by terry1966, 23 April 2015 - 06:39 AM.

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#5
Marchalla

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So far so good it seems to work using some of the tips. I tried using sudo and it worked but the programs did not install.

I tried to install the chrome browser and I also tried to install wine. I had trouble with the software manager it won't complete the installing of software.

Everytime I open something important like software manager the prompt for password allways comes on when trying to install any.


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#6
terry1966

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yes that's how it should work because your installing things you will usually need to enter the password.

 

with linux if you need any help then you really need to explain what you've done and post any error messages you got, it's those error messages that will usually tell you exactly what the problem is like a missing package you need to install.

 

also with linux you usually want to install some repositories first and then install the programs you need contained in those repos.

 

your using mint 12 which is an old version (no idea how old though.) so you might want to consider installing the latest version which i believe is mint 17.1

 

this is how to install chrome. :- http://community.lin...orial/view/1774

i recommend downloading the user guide and giving that a good read. :- http://community.lin...utorial/view/20

this is the mint community tutorials page :- http://community.lin...tutorial/search

and the mint community is probably one of the best places to go and get any help with using mint too.

 

you can always keep posting here of course and i or some other member will try and sort out any problems you may be having. :D

 

:popcorn:

 

just had a thought you said it's a new machine and came with mint installed so do you actually know the password it keeps asking you for? i assumed you were the one who set it up so would have needed to enter your user name and that password during setup.

 

if not then that will have to be the first thing you need to do :- http://community.lin...torial/view/339


Edited by terry1966, 23 April 2015 - 03:27 PM.

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#7
Marchalla

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Sure the pc is a refurbished one with a newly installed OS. The tutorials I've been starting to go through may take a little while to learn it. I did try to install a few programs

like virtual box also wine and chrome I have the software packages I downloaded. The synaptic manager is a little new to me but I'm working on getting basic stuff down.

Hopefully it won't be too long and I'll learn a few things about it. It seems that the packages in the synaptic manager could be explained a little bit like which way

should I do this. I have a little problem with the software manager. It won't complete any downloads and it always needs to prompt for log in credentials.

I don't really find these things in the user guides so far but I'm working on it. Thank you!


Edited by Marchalla, 23 April 2015 - 05:15 PM.

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#8
terry1966

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I have a little problem with the software manager. It won't complete any downloads and it always needs to prompt for log in credentials.

 

that sounds like it is trying to get stuff from a bad repository, maybe it's no longer in use, like i said mint 12 is an old version so you may be better off installing the newest version or see about upgrading it to the newest version before you really start to get into things.

 

linux is free so won't cost you anything except maybe a dvd or cd to burn the installation media onto if you don't have a usb stick you can use.

 

:popcorn:

 

http://community.lin...tutorial/view/2

A new version of Linux Mint is released every 6 months. It usually comes with new features and improvements but there's nothing wrong with sticking with the release you already have. In fact, you could skip many releases and stick with the version that works for you.

 

Each release receives bug fixes and security updates for about 18 months (or 3 years in the case of "Long Term Support" releases such as Linux Mint 13). The development team is also focused on the latest release. If bug fixes and security updates are important to you, you should regularly upgrade to the latest releases, otherwise there's nothing wrong with keeping things as they are.

yep i'd definitely install the latest version first and forget about using mint 12, i think you'll find it will make things easier for you in the long run.


Edited by terry1966, 24 April 2015 - 12:53 AM.

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#9
Marchalla

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Sure I'm thinking of that and probably will thank you.


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#10
NaaYaa

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In Linux distributions, two major versions of package management tools exist:

 

RPM Package Manager (RPM)
Debian package manager
 
Mint is based on Ubuntu/Debian so it uses the Debian package manager. The command you are looking for is apt-get. Here you have more information about it: apt-get

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#11
Marchalla

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Thank you! I'm no longer working with that system but I still want to learn it.


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#12
NaaYaa

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No problem, just ask if you have any questions :-) 


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#13
virtualsrvnet

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Nice learnings.

 

 

 

 

Best regards,

http://www.virtual-server.net


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#14
imort

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My question is how do I install software by opening a terminal and using certain types of commands? My problem is that it requires a couple of things and I need to know more about it. The command line and sudo commands, also the part about a password I'm working on. I need to get these down before I can use this way of installing a program.

 

Didn't sure what do you mean about 'installing a program'

You can use both desktop package manager (if you have a desktop installed) or using 'apt-get install' or 'yum install' depending from your distribution.

Of course you'll need to know package name to install it.

You also will need the root privileges to install any program.


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