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Trouble booting PC after power goes out. (Resolved).


Best Answer wayneman50 , 13 July 2015 - 04:41 PM

I ordered one that sends a shutdown signal to the PC. Would you recommend I also get a new hard drive since this one seems so prone to corruption? Go to the full post »


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#1
wayneman50

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I have Windows 7. Whenever the power to my PC goes out, I have a lot of trouble getting my PC to boot up.  When I power it on, it will get to the screen where I have two accounts: HP Administrator and my personal account. Whichever one I pick, the screen goes black and just sits there. Eventually I pressed ctrl-alt-del and just started clicking things. I think it was Log Off, then I logged back on that finally got me in.

 

Thanks.


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#2
phillpower2

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Hello wayneman50,

 

This could be the HDD going out so we should ensure that you have this covered before doing anything else.

 

Two things that I suggest you do asap, if you have not already done so that is, back up any important data from the HDD and if you do not have a Windows 7 installation DVD disk create a HP Recovery disk or USB flash drive, "how to" here

 

Post back with an update when you are ready.


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#3
wayneman50

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Thank you for your response. Yes, I have HP recovery discs and have been backing up my important files for years. 

 

I hope I was clear in my explanation. I am referring to times when power to my house goes out due to a storm, or maybe I accidently unplug the wrong fuse.


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#4
phillpower2

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Recovery disks and data backed up information acknowledged  :thumbsup:

 

I did read your OP as you intended and the guidance above was the norm for such behaviour, safe in the knowledge that you have recovery media and your data backed up I now suggest that you test the HDD.

 

Run the HDDs diagnostics tool;
Make sure you select the tool that is appropriate for the brand of your hard drive but if unsure of the brand Seatools works well with most of them http://www.tacktech.com/display.cfm?ttid=287
Depending on the program it'll create a bootable floppy or a bootable DVD/CD.
If the downloaded file is the .iso type use ImgBurn to burn the .iso file to a DVD/CD disk depending on your OS (select "Write image file to disc" option) and make the disk bootable.

RE ImgBurn: please use the custom install and uncheck the attached foistware such as "Install Entrusted Toolbar etc


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#5
wayneman50

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This is just doing diagnostics, right? We're not wiping any data or anything drastic at this point, are we?

 

BTW, I just saw Terminator Genisys and thought it was terrific.


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#6
wayneman50

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I called HP and they told me this info about my hard drive:

 

– gnrc  400 gb 600 7.2 k  SAD3  DTO

 

I didn't see gnrc as a choice of brands on the web site you provided, so I tried Sea Tools. On the Basic Tests dropdown, there are a number of choices. Which one do I choose?

SMART Test

Short Drive Self Test

Drive Information

Short Generic
Long Generic

 

Thanks.


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#7
phillpower2

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Testing the HDD does not involve wiping any data, the reason why backing up data before testing the drive is always recommended is because a flaky HDD can fail at any time and most certainly when running diagnostics on it as a stress test is part of the procedure.
 
Soon as I can lighten the workload I will be off to watch the new Terminator myself  :thumbsup:
 
Short Generic first and then the Long Generic please, this because it is possible for a drive to pass one but not the other which can lead to a false sense of security.
 
You are welcome  :)

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#8
wayneman50

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Are you familiar with Windows Backup utility? I created a System Image. From what I found on Microsoft's web site, a System Image contains the entire hard drive contents, correct?


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#9
phillpower2

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Not used the Windows Backup utility myself so cannot comment on how it performs but you are correct in that it does create an exact image of all data on a drive.

 

Have you run any tests yet.


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#10
wayneman50

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Short and Long Generic both passed.


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#11
phillpower2

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That is good news  :thumbsup:

 

How is the computer behaving atm.


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#12
wayneman50

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It can be slow right after starting up, but once up, it does pretty well.


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#13
phillpower2

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Slow start up times are often caused by unnecessary programs loading on boot, please see the canned text below provided courtesy of colleague ztruker to see if it helps speed things up;

 

Use msconfig to determine what is causing the problem

These are good tutorials on using msconfig in XP, Vista or Windows 7:
How to use msconfig in Windows XP
How to use msconfig in Windows Vista
How to use msconfig in Windows 7 and Windows 8

Click on Start then Run, type msconfig and press Enter.
Click on the Startup tab (for Windows 8, the Startup tab has a link to open Task Manager/Startup tab. Use that.) make a note of what is currently starting then click the Disable Allbutton.
Reboot and see if it runs better.
If yes then use msconfig to enable several items at a time till you find the culprit.


If no, start msconfig and click on the Services tab.
Check the Hide All Microsoft Services box, record what is currently starting then click the Disable All button.
Again, do a regular boot, see if it runs normal.
If yes then use msconfig to enable services until you find the culprit.


Once you've found the culprit, uninstall it or find out how to eliminate it from your system. Simply disabling it in msconfig is a temporary fix at best.
Enable everything else you disabled.  


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#14
wayneman50

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I would like to pursue your suggestion, but first can we determine the cause of my difficulty booting the PC after power is cut off?


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#15
phillpower2

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The computer continually being shut down prematurely due to loss of power will result in Windows becoming damaged and/or corrupt + fragmentation of files, upon reboot the said files are having to be put back into place by Windows before it can load correctly, sorry but I can't explain it any better.


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