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D drive and contents gone - system extremely slow


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#1
delman

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Spent hours yesterday resizing hundreds of pictures to show on a large screen TV. Stored the resized pictures on the "D" drive, which I believe is a partition on the Samsung HD160JJ/P hard drive. Total space consumed was about 15GB.

I then ran a "Disk Cleanup" and a defrag on "D", both of which ended successfully. Tried to backup the pictures on a flash but got an error on a .MOV file which halted the backup.

It was late so I shut the machine down.

This morning the machine, running XP took forever to boot-up and even longer to do any type of service. When I opened "My Computer" the "D" drive was listed but showed no info......no, capacity used or available. W tried to open the drive I got nothing.

I ran "Device Manager" which said the Samsung hard drive was working properly, however there was no information listed in the Volume section.

At this point I appear to be able to use the system but every service takes 15-30 seconds......and I have apparently lost all the work I had done yesterday......fortunately I had an earlier backup so I haven't lost the pictures.

 

I spent the past 4 hours trying to trouble shoot this with no results. 

 

Would appreciate any help or suggestions concerning if and how this can be fixed.

 

I used Geeks-to-Go back in 2011, my contact was Macboatmaster who was extremely helpful, so I feel confident you'll give me the right advice.

 

 

 


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#2
Dashing star

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I used Geeks-to-Go back in 2011, my contact was Macboatmaster who was extremely helpful, so I feel confident you'll give me the right advice.

 

You need help with only Macboatmaster?

 

Regards  :)


 


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#3
Dashing star

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I am afraid of your hard disk went bad..  :(

 

Run chkdsk /f /r in command prompt to see whether your hard disk is good.

 

Regards


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#4
delman

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Thanks for the advice Dashing Star....and no I don't need to get help from Macboatmaster.

.

I tried to run chkdsk following a re-boot and got this system response:

 

The type of the file system is NTFS.

Cannot lock current drive.

 

Chkdsk cannot run because the volume is in use by another process. 

 

.....so I'm not sure if the drive is bad or not....would it be worth running msconfig following a re-boot to see what processes are active and possibly tying up the drive?


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#5
Dashing star

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Try this,

 

step 1:

 

From an Elevated Command Prompt in Safe Mode

chkdsk D: /r 

The type of the file system is NTFS.
Cannot lock current drive.

Chkdsk cannot run because the volume is in use by another
process.  Would you like to schedule this volume to be
checked the next time the system restarts? (Y/N)

Press the the letter y and then press the Enter Key.
Restart the computer for chkdsk.exe to run

 

step 2:

 

1.  Open Computer by clicking the Start button, and then clicking Computer.

2.  Right-click the hard disk drive that you want to check, and then click Properties.

3.  Click the Tools tab, and then, under Error-checking, click Check Now.  If you are prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.

To automatically repair problems with files and folders that the scan detects, select Automatically fix file system errors. Otherwise, the disk check will simply report problems but not fix them.

To perform a thorough disk check, select Scan for and attempt recovery of bad sectors. This scan attempts to find and repair physical errors on the hard disk itself, and it can take much longer to complete.

To check for both file errors and physical errors, select both Automatically fix file system errors and Scan for and attempt recovery of bad sectors.

 

step 3:

 

At the command prompt, type the following line, and then press ENTER:
sfc /scannow
When the scan is complete, test to see whether the issue that you are experiencing is resolved


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#6
delman

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Sorry it took so long to get back.......I tried everything you suggested, actually a number of times over the past week+, with unpredictable results.

Without boring you with the details, I've given up trying to fix this problem and ordered a new Lenovo today.

 

Your advice did provide a good learning experience for me and that is truly appreciated.

 

Thanks!


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#7
Dashing star

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Hello delman,

 

Your Update is appreciated!  :thumbsup:

 

Have fun with new laptop! :rockon:

 

Regards  :wave:


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