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ASUS N56U Network Password Won't Reset!


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#1
interpolarity

interpolarity

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So I had an old ASUS N56U router I was trying to use as a wireless repeater/extender. We are struggling to get a steady signal in the bedroom which is the farthest from the router. It is the only place it can be because the modem is plugged in there and there is no other live cable in the house to better position it. So initially I tried to set up the router as an Access Point in repeater mode but that didn't work. Then I decided to follow an online tutorial for installing custom firmware on it called Padavan. I downloaded the correct version and after doing a hard reset on the router, I updated the firmware. It was successful except one problem I cannot figure out... The router outputs a 2.4 GHz signal called ASUS. The problem? It is password protected and I NEVER set a password for it. I did several hard resets and nothing worked. It always comes back with a password. I tried guessing and it only accepted 8+ characters. It is NONE of the passwords I would have set and I have NO idea what it is. I just want to access the router settings (even if I could somehow access it through ethernet) and turn that router into an extender/repeater. IF this is not a possibility and I've magically rendered my router useless, then please recommend me a solution to get steady Wi-Fi in the whole house. Thank you.
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#2
SpywareDr

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"Steady Wi-Fi" is an illusive goal..The Wi-Fi signal is going through the air and is subjected to all kinds of interference.

 

Wikipedia: WiFi > Interference

Interference

For more details on this topic, see Electromagnetic interference at 2.4 GHz.

Wi-Fi connections can be disrupted or the internet speed lowered by having other devices in the same area. Many 2.4 GHz 802.11b and 802.11g access-points default to the same channel on initial startup, contributing to congestion on certain channels. Wi-Fi pollution, or an excessive number of access points in the area, especially on the neighboring channel, can prevent access and interfere with other devices' use of other access points, caused by overlapping channels in the 802.11g/b spectrum, as well as with decreased signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) between access points. This can become a problem in high-density areas, such as large apartment complexes or office buildings with many Wi-Fi access points.

Additionally, other devices use the 2.4 GHz band: microwave ovens, ISM band devices, security cameras, ZigBee devices, Bluetooth devices, video senders, cordless phones, baby monitors, and (in some countries) Amateur radio all of which can cause significant additional interference. It is also an issue when municipalities or other large entities (such as universities) seek to provide large area coverage.


Even bad electrical connections can cause broad RF spectrum emissions.
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#3
interpolarity

interpolarity

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"Steady Wi-Fi" is an illusive goal..The Wi-Fi signal is going through the air and is subjected to all kinds of interference.

 

Wikipedia: WiFi > Interference

 

Interference

For more details on this topic, see Electromagnetic interference at 2.4 GHz.

Wi-Fi connections can be disrupted or the internet speed lowered by having other devices in the same area. Many 2.4 GHz 802.11b and 802.11g access-points default to the same channel on initial startup, contributing to congestion on certain channels. Wi-Fi pollution, or an excessive number of access points in the area, especially on the neighboring channel, can prevent access and interfere with other devices' use of other access points, caused by overlapping channels in the 802.11g/b spectrum, as well as with decreased signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) between access points. This can become a problem in high-density areas, such as large apartment complexes or office buildings with many Wi-Fi access points.

Additionally, other devices use the 2.4 GHz band: microwave ovens, ISM band devices, security cameras, ZigBee devices, Bluetooth devices, video senders, cordless phones, baby monitors, and (in some countries) Amateur radio all of which can cause significant additional interference. It is also an issue when municipalities or other large entities (such as universities) seek to provide large area coverage.


Even bad electrical connections can cause broad RF spectrum emissions.

 

 

 

OK, so no disrespect but this doesn't help me at all. I don't need to know why my WiFi isn't working there (I actually already know why it isn't working well). What I need to know is the following:

 

1. Why is my router putting a password on the wireless network even after several hard resets (and even clearing nvram)?

2. If I can't fix this router, what is the best solution, other than running a wire all across my house, to make the internet work a little better? (I am willing to take a dip in speed, I just need a connection that isn't dropping every 5 seconds)

 

Thank you.


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