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Underclocking a GPU

GPU Underclocking Graphics Power

Best Answer TheZorcs , 26 August 2015 - 05:08 AM

Well i shall hold off on underclocking! Thanks anyway for letting me know how to do so. appreciate it ^^ Go to the full post »


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#1
TheZorcs

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So.. Everyone knows about Overcloking GPU's for increased performance on everything you play.

 

Would it be a good idea to Underclock a GPU to make it work less, hence less work for the GPU fan

 

I would like to also know, if i should do this.. (I'd be using MSI afterburner to underclock) IS there any consquences? Do can i risk damaging something? 

or is it completely safe to do this?

 

and thanks in advance for advice and answers..

 

This is my GPU: http://puu.sh/jF1o3/e5deb64fbb.png(Including the 2 monitors being used, with info)

 

My gpu can reach 75 C when playing Dishonored on 1280x1024 resolution, maybe a bit more depending on area.

 

or around 83 on 1440x900 resolution

 

(Quality is on lowest)   I'm assuming that underclocking a GPU would obviously make it work less, and guessing that it would lower temperature aswell?


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#2
Dashing star

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I feel like these cards are meant to run perfectly fine at stock settings and should last a while leaving at stock. I don't think it make sense to underclock unless your temps were crazy high for some reason. You should leave it at stock. I'm sure you could even overclock it a bit and it would still last the usual amount of time. Whatever speed your card manufacturer released it at is perfectly safe to run at that speed and if you did have a problem it should be covered by warranty.


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#3
TheZorcs

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When i was playing dishonored, the temp went to 83 C Speccy was showing RED indicating that it's in the dangerzone. It's too hot. So it is reaching crazy high temperatures 

I'm not one for overclocking. I prefer preserving something rather than shortning it.

 

I don't have enough cooling, or powerful enough cooling to overclock, i'm afraid to play any "more graphic" intensive games. because i know that Dishonored is not intensive what so ever. And the temp goes up way too high.

 

I heard that this card commonly runs at 65-70 C under high stress.  seeming as my card doesn't even run under "high" stress, i never play on high graphics on any game.

 

Card can goto 80 C but when it goes near 90.. IS when you should worry. is what i've heard regarding temperatures of this card. right now my card is at 48-51 C doing nothing at all. 

 

If i boot up any other game that's requiring more power it's gonna rise even more ( from 48-51 to - 75-80ish ), Oh.. and the fan speed was running at 75% when it was at 83 C.The fan didn't see to do much at all to prevent the heat.

 

Also. I believe i didn't get my questions answered regarding wether it's safe or not to underclock.


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#4
Dashing star

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Nope nothing wrong with underclocking at all.

Go ahead and use profiles with Afterburner and switch between them when needed

If the voltage is too low, itll just probably artifact on you or freeze - just reboot and adjust

If it's still running too hot, the thermal paste needs to be replaced. Don't waste your time downclocking.


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#5
TheZorcs

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Okay. good to know. Do you have any other recommendations?

 

I don't like the fact that my GPU fan runs at 75% when the gpu temp is at 83C.. Isn't it supposed to go down by then?

 

 

EDIT: I should probably change the thermal paste if the fan isn't cooling, right?


Edited by TheZorcs, 18 August 2015 - 04:55 AM.

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#6
Dashing star

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Yes. I give my recommendations below. Before that as you ask,

 

 

I don't like the fact that my GPU fan runs at 75% when the gpu temp is at 83C.. Isn't it supposed to go down by then?

 

Yes, it will go down when you Underclock it.

 

A quote from google,

 

 

 

CPU underclocking:
For microprocessors, the purpose is generally to decrease the need for heat dissipation devices or decrease the electrical power consumption. This can provide increased system stability in high-heat environments, or can allow a system to run with a lower airflow (and therefore quieter) cooling fan or without one at all.

 

Also you ask,

 

 

EDIT: I should probably change the thermal paste if the fan isn't cooling, right?

 

Yes. You should do it to reduce the temp.

 

Now finally, My recommendations:

 

 

Hot tips for reducing your computer's temp. virtually:

 

  • Underclock Graphics Card. You will eventually lose performance, but the gained longer lifetime of your components covers the losses. Note for gamers: human eye can only see roughly ~24 FPS. Most of the Graphics Cards currently sold offer hundreds of FPS. This is simply a waste.
  • Downclock your Processor. I do not give advice to this, because the ways and methods are bound to your exact equipment. Google is your friend with this method.
  • Increase FAN-speeds. SpeedFan is an excellent program for this. You can control the spinning speeds (rPm - rounds per minute) of all the FANs connected to your motherboard. Increasing the speed will also increase noise level, but reduces the over-heating dramatically.
  • Update your drivers. This might sound weird, but indeed they do have something to do with temperatures. There are processes in the software that you can not control. Running those processes faster and smoother with newer drivers reduces the usage of the specific component.

 

Reduce your computer's temperatures physically

In this part I will demonstrate what to do inside your computer case. Always, before starting to operate please remove all the static charge in you:

 

Disconnect all the cables connected to your computer case.

 

Place the computer to a solid, flat surface. Touch the metallic frame of your computer with either hand - this removes the small "voltage in you".

 

Also remember to handle all the components with extremely "soft hand". Every component of your computer is designed to be able to be removed with a soft touch - if something seems stuck, you are doing something wrong.

 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Tools needed:

- A screwdriver
- A wrench
- Vacuum cleaner (and) a bottle of compressed air (1-5 euros / bottle)
- A dry towel
- A tube of thermal glue (2-12 euros)

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

  1. Remove the power-cable. Also disconnect every cable that is connected to your case (eg. USBs / Display device).
  2. Remove the static charge in you (as advised above)
  3. Remove both side-plates from your case. Turn it side-ways so you will have the motherboard upwards and components pointing at you.
  4. Turn on the vacuum cleaner, set it to full power and suck all the "flying" dirt and dust in your case. Do not hit the components but let the mouth of the vacuum cleaner be some millimeters above them.
  5. After a short "round" with the vacuum cleaner, put it away and remove the static charge off you again.
  6. Disconnect every cable inside the case. If you are unsure of how to re-build it, please use a camera / notepad to make a reminder. If there are bunches of cables connected with a cable tie, you can freely cut it with scissors. Also note that some of the cables have a small "lock" in the end of them, do not try to force them off - look for locks.
  7. Remove your Graphics card by opening 1-3 screws from the frame, and unlocking it from the base.
  8. Cleaning of the GPU:
  9. Wipe all the visible area with the dry towel.
  10. Use the bottle of the compressed air to blow all the dirt and dust from the inner holes. Finally catch all the "stuff" with vacuum cleaner. Be sure not to directly hit the component with either of the tools.
  11. Try to remove all the dust from the FAN's blades.
  12. Remove your motherboard by opening 4-12 (usually) screws in the bottom. Carefully lift it off and place it to a solid and flat surface. It might be heavy, depending on the size of your processor-cooler.
  13. Remove RAM-memory sticks. These 1-8 narrow sticks are extremely sensitive and should be handled with the softest hand.

Cleaning of the RAM(s):

 

  1. Use the dry towel to gently rub the metallic contact plates.
  2. Remove the processor-cooler. This FAN - which is used to transfer the heat off from the processor under it - can be either a small passive metallic box or a huge pile of bronze plates covering half of the motherboard. The processor-cooler is usually attached with 4-6 screws connected to the same amount of female screws under the motherboard.
  3. When you detach the processor-cooler, you will reveal the processor itself. The processor is a small metallic piece under it, with usually some sort of thermal glue in the surface.
  4. Lack of the thermal glue is one of most common reasons of the overheating of your processor.
  5. Before applying a new drop of the thermal glue, clean up the cooler itself.

 

Cleaning of the processor-cooler (CPU-FAN):

 

  1. Use the bottle of the compressed air in every small hole of the cooler to blow all the dirt and dust off. After carefully removing the visible dirt, proceed to wipe the FAN's blades with the dry towel.
  2. Finalize this operation by sucking the loose "stuff" with the vacuum cleaner. You can hit the metallic areas of the cooler, but do not touch the FAN.

 

Re-applying the thermal glue:

 

  1. First of all you need to remove the old glue off the both processor-cooler and processor itself. Use the dry towel to do this.
  2. Most of the glues are made so they dissolve with water, but some might not. To avoid troubles with this, do not use your house's best towel for this.
  3. After carefully removing the old glue, proceed to the applying of the new one:

 

  • Drop two (2) drops of glue to the middle of the processor's surface. The diameter of the "pile" should be 1-2 mm. Do not spread it.
  • Try to attach the processor-cooler directly on its correct spot not to spread the glue unevenly.
  • With the wrench and screwdriver, mount the processor-cooler strictly to the motherboard. Make sure to use some force in this operation, as it is extremely important for your processor-cooler not to move / shake when your computer is turned on.

 

  1. Attach the RAM-stick(s).
  2. Attach the motherboard back to it's original location, and mount the Graphics Card to it.
  3. Before connecting all the cables, use the bottle of the compressed air to remove the dust and dirt of all the possible FANs located in the sides of your case.
  4. Connect all the cables to their original locations and attach the side-plates to your case.

 

Tip to the end:

 

Make sure your case is ventilated intelligently. The processor-cooler of your system should be blowing air either straight up (if the case is on its side) or towards the FAN to its left side (if the case is standing normally). The FAN on the upper side of the back-plate should be blowing air out. If you have a FAN in the roof of your case, make sure it is also blowing air out.

 

You can use cable ties to increase the air-flow by tying the cables to several bunches.


Edited by Dashing star, 18 August 2015 - 06:02 AM.

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#7
TheZorcs

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Thanks a lot for the long list of great recommendations! I shall keep these recommendations in mind!, currently i do not have compressed air (I know where to get some.)

 

as for the Thermal paste, I am not familiar with which type i should get. "Arctic silver 5/4/2" I don't know for certain. I'm assuming different paste has different effect?

 

Now for the underclocking, MSI Afterburner has that ability. Do I adjust BOTH Memory clock, and Core clock? or just one of them?

 

http://puu.sh/jFJal/e416ee7218.jpg<-- Showing MSI afterburner (Though i am quite certain you seen it before, and have knownledge of how it works)

 

Also. Do i need to check "Unlock core voltage" and that stuff in order to underclock? or will it still let me?

 

Also Does underclocking a GPU, make the voltage stay at the current level? and if so, do i need to lower the voltage in that case?

 

or am i just good to go and lower the core clock and memory clock with nothing else happening?


Edited by TheZorcs, 18 August 2015 - 08:03 AM.

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#8
Dashing star

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For Thermal paste you should see here for good one.

 

Give me some time to review about voltages.

 

Be patient!  :geek:


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#9
TheZorcs

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Alright! Take your time :) i'll be patient.


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#10
Dashing star

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Advantage:

 

* Reduced heat from your device.
* Good battery life.

 

Disadvantage:

 

* Extreme undervolting will make your device unstable and some times even end up with a boot loop.

 

you may be able to lower some of the core voltage, though of course just like overclocking, you'll need to run stability test for underclocking (which at times is a more meaningful art)

 

Try to adjust the core voltage and see simultaneously the core clock values changed!


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#11
TheZorcs

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ooh gosh.. that sounds like trouble to me..since i am an amateur at this... I have a feeling that if i attempt this i'm just gonna make things 30times worse..


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#12
Dashing star

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ooh gosh.. that sounds like trouble to me..since i am an amateur at this... I have a feeling that if i attempt this i'm just gonna make things 30times worse..

 

:oops:  If you are not sure please didn't do this. It is easy to make things worse but it is difficult to revert back normal things. :no:

 

Regards


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#13
TheZorcs

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✓  Best Answer

Well i shall hold off on underclocking! :) Thanks anyway for letting me know how to do so. appreciate it ^^


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#14
Dashing star

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Thanks for updating!  :thumbsup:

 

Post back if you have issues  :)

 

Regards  :wave:


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