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PC temporarily crashed during storm.

Crash power outage surge

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#1
SuperSapien

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Last night I was up with a bad case of insomnia and there was a brief storm during which the power for my desktop timed out temporarily I have a UPS surge protector and I didn't hear it beep which would indicate there was a major surge but I feel uneasy now. What should I do? :bashhead: :confused: :blush:


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#2
dsenette

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if the system didn't shut down, then the UPS likely did it's job. would be nice to know what make/model UPS you have to see it's capabilities. but typically if it's got surge protection as well as battery backup it should be able to filter most types of power events from harming your computer (it's kind of what they're for). 

 

best thing to do would be to check with the UPS manufacturer to see if they have any kind of diagnostic steps that can be done with that style UPS to make sure it's still in good working order.

 

typically, with a normal surge protector, once they're tripped by a surge....they need to be replaced. usually the surge protection in a UPS DOESN'T have that same requirement, but it's best to check with the manufacturer to be sure


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#3
SuperSapien

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if the system didn't shut down, then the UPS likely did it's job. would be nice to know what make/model UPS you have to see it's capabilities. but typically if it's got surge protection as well as battery backup it should be able to filter most types of power events from harming your computer (it's kind of what they're for). 

 

best thing to do would be to check with the UPS manufacturer to see if they have any kind of diagnostic steps that can be done with that style UPS to make sure it's still in good working order.

 

typically, with a normal surge protector, once they're tripped by a surge....they need to be replaced. usually the surge protection in a UPS DOESN'T have that same requirement, but it's best to check with the manufacturer to be sure

Its a Cyberpower 550va.

And ever since that night Netrunner OS (Linux) has been kind of buggy although Windows 7 seems fine.


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#4
dsenette

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if the system didn't shut down, then the UPS likely did it's job. would be nice to know what make/model UPS you have to see it's capabilities. but typically if it's got surge protection as well as battery backup it should be able to filter most types of power events from harming your computer (it's kind of what they're for). 

 

best thing to do would be to check with the UPS manufacturer to see if they have any kind of diagnostic steps that can be done with that style UPS to make sure it's still in good working order.

 

typically, with a normal surge protector, once they're tripped by a surge....they need to be replaced. usually the surge protection in a UPS DOESN'T have that same requirement, but it's best to check with the manufacturer to be sure

Its a Cyberpower 550va.

And ever since that night Netrunner OS (Linux) has been kind of buggy although Windows 7 seems fine.

 

if there was an electrical event, you'd imagine that both OS's would be effected by any hardware damage on a dual boot system. the two things are likely unrelated.


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#5
SuperSapien

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if the system didn't shut down, then the UPS likely did it's job. would be nice to know what make/model UPS you have to see it's capabilities. but typically if it's got surge protection as well as battery backup it should be able to filter most types of power events from harming your computer (it's kind of what they're for). 

 

best thing to do would be to check with the UPS manufacturer to see if they have any kind of diagnostic steps that can be done with that style UPS to make sure it's still in good working order.

 

typically, with a normal surge protector, once they're tripped by a surge....they need to be replaced. usually the surge protection in a UPS DOESN'T have that same requirement, but it's best to check with the manufacturer to be sure

Its a Cyberpower 550va.

And ever since that night Netrunner OS (Linux) has been kind of buggy although Windows 7 seems fine.

 

if there was an electrical event, you'd imagine that both OS's would be effected by any hardware damage on a dual boot system. the two things are likely unrelated.

 

Ive been using Windows for the last few days now and everything is running fine but on Linux certain apps launch slowly especially sandboxed (Firejail) ones but it wasn't much of an issue until my desktop temporarily powered down my guess is that certain processes & app where damaged during this event not to mention I was already experiencing some minor issues because I was using Bleachbit to liberally.

I'll probably have to reinstall Linux on my second HDD. But I'm not sure if this will effect Windows at all? 


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#6
westom

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Last night I was up with a bad case of insomnia and there was a brief storm during which the power for my desktop timed out temporarily I have a UPS surge protector  :blush:

Describe timeout. A blackout?  A power off?  A temporary freeze of the internet?  Screen going into screen saver mode?

 

What so concerns you?  I do not see anything that says damage.

 

Meanwhile the UPS is not a surge protector.  For if it was, then someone can post numeric specifications that say so.  A UPS is temporary and 'dirty' power so that a computer can operate (ie save unsaved data) during a blackout.  That is not a surge protector.

 

Furthermore, a blackout does not cause Operating System damage in any properly designed computer.

 

Any protector that fails or is damaged by a surge was grossly undersized - a profit center.  Some protectors are $3 power strip with ten cent protector parts.  A surge, too tiny to overwhelm protectoin inside any computer, can also destroy a grossly undersized protector.  Then naive sonsumers use wild speculation - "My protector sacrificed itself to save my computer." 

 

The myth is popular because so many expensive and undersized protectors are damaged by surges too tiny to destroy any other household appliance.  Even protection inside clocks, dishwasher, kitchen and bathroom GFCIs, and smoke detectors were more than sufficient to protect from a surge that destroys a grossly undersized and obscenely profitable protector.

 

Again, what has you so worried? And why?


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#7
SuperSapien

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Last night I was up with a bad case of insomnia and there was a brief storm during which the power for my desktop timed out temporarily I have a UPS surge protector  :blush:

Describe timeout. A blackout?  A power off?  A temporary freeze of the internet?  Screen going into screen saver mode?

 

What so concerns you?  I do not see anything that says damage.

 

Meanwhile the UPS is not a surge protector.  For if it was, then someone can post numeric specifications that say so.  A UPS is temporary and 'dirty' power so that a computer can operate (ie save unsaved data) during a blackout.  That is not a surge protector.

 

Furthermore, a blackout does not cause Operating System damage in any properly designed computer.

 

Any protector that fails or is damaged by a surge was grossly undersized - a profit center.  Some protectors are $3 power strip with ten cent protector parts.  A surge, too tiny to overwhelm protectoin inside any computer, can also destroy a grossly undersized protector.  Then naive sonsumers use wild speculation - "My protector sacrificed itself to save my computer." 

 

The myth is popular because so many expensive and undersized protectors are damaged by surges too tiny to destroy any other household appliance.  Even protection inside clocks, dishwasher, kitchen and bathroom GFCIs, and smoke detectors were more than sufficient to protect from a surge that destroys a grossly undersized and obscenely profitable protector.

 

Again, what has you so worried? And why?

 

My PC & monitor turned off for a few seconds and I believe my lamp did as well so it was likely a blackout also I was running a bunch of applications when this happened. So if a blackout doesn't cause OS damage what about a surge? I'm just trying to narrow down everything and I agree it doesn't appear damaged but I'm not very hardware savvy that's why I'm here. BTW my UPS doubles as a surge protector: http://www.cyberpowe...P550SLG&x=0&y=0


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#8
westom

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My PC & monitor turned off for a few seconds and I believe my lamp did as well so it was likely a blackout also I was running a bunch of applications when this happened. So if a blackout doesn't cause OS damage what about a surge? I'm just trying to narrow down everything and I agree it doesn't appear damaged but I'm not very hardware savvy that's why I'm here. BTW my UPS doubles as a surge protector: http://www.cyberpowe...P550SLG&x=0&y=0

 

 

So you had a blackout (near to or zero volts).  Not a surge (many thousands of volts).  Your UPS (if functional) means nothing should have powered off.  Caution - a UPS is typically made so cheaply that its battery typically lasts for only three years.

 

Is it a surge protector?  Did you read subjective claims where lying is legal?  Or did you read its specification numbers where they cannot lie?  That UPS may absorb 290 joules and never more than 590.  A surge that tiny is often safely absorbed by a computer's power supply; converted to low voltage DC to power its own semiconductors.  Yes, it claims surge protection - so tiny as to be virtually zero.  Scammers need you to only read subjectively - and never demand spec numbers.

 

What is also a surge protector?  Tie knots in a power cord.  That also is a surge protector.  Then ask for the numbers.

 

Power up your computer.  Pull the UPS power cord from a wall receptacle.  That computer should work completely uninterrupted if the UPS is functional.

 

Surges damage hardware - not software.  What hardware damage exists?  Unfortunately protectors located too close to a computer and too far from earth ground can even compromise protection inside computers.  Just another reason why informed homeowners properly earth one 'whole house' protector.  Because if anything needs protection, then everything needs protection - including dishwasher, clocks, LED bulbs, dimmer switches, TV, microwave, smoke detectors, bathroom and kitchen GFCIs, etc.

 

Most who recommend surge protectors do not know what they do, ignore numbers, and are easily scammed by hearsay.  UPS has one function - temporary and 'dirty' power during a blackout.  To protect unsaved data; not to protect hardware.


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#9
SuperSapien

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My PC & monitor turned off for a few seconds and I believe my lamp did as well so it was likely a blackout also I was running a bunch of applications when this happened. So if a blackout doesn't cause OS damage what about a surge? I'm just trying to narrow down everything and I agree it doesn't appear damaged but I'm not very hardware savvy that's why I'm here. BTW my UPS doubles as a surge protector: http://www.cyberpowe...P550SLG&x=0&y=0

 

 

So you had a blackout (near to or zero volts).  Not a surge (many thousands of volts).  Your UPS (if functional) means nothing should have powered off.  Caution - a UPS is typically made so cheaply that its battery typically lasts for only three years.

 

Is it a surge protector?  Did you read subjective claims where lying is legal?  Or did you read its specification numbers where they cannot lie?  That UPS may absorb 290 joules and never more than 590.  A surge that tiny is often safely absorbed by a computer's power supply; converted to low voltage DC to power its own semiconductors.  Yes, it claims surge protection - so tiny as to be virtually zero.  Scammers need you to only read subjectively - and never demand spec numbers.

 

What is also a surge protector?  Tie knots in a power cord.  That also is a surge protector.  Then ask for the numbers.

 

Power up your computer.  Pull the UPS power cord from a wall receptacle.  That computer should work completely uninterrupted if the UPS is functional.

 

Surges damage hardware - not software.  What hardware damage exists?  Unfortunately protectors located too close to a computer and too far from earth ground can even compromise protection inside computers.  Just another reason why informed homeowners properly earth one 'whole house' protector.  Because if anything needs protection, then everything needs protection - including dishwasher, clocks, LED bulbs, dimmer switches, TV, microwave, smoke detectors, bathroom and kitchen GFCIs, etc.

 

Most who recommend surge protectors do not know what they do, ignore numbers, and are easily scammed by hearsay.  UPS has one function - temporary and 'dirty' power during a blackout.  To protect unsaved data; not to protect hardware.

 

Well I tried upluging my UPS and my PC didn't power off so its working but it's strange that during that storm it briefly turned off. :unsure: BTW the surge suppression for my UPS is 890 Joules: http://www.cyberpowe...imageI=#tab-box


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#10
westom

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Edited by westom, 13 September 2015 - 06:51 PM.

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#11
westom

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BTW the surge suppression for my UPS is 890 Joules:

 

 

Now view numbers I correctly provided.  Those numbers apply to a protector rated at 890 joules.  

 

Even 890 joules is near zero when destructive surges can be tens or hundreds of thousands of joules.

 

Was the PC doing something stressful (ie playing a movie)?


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#12
SuperSapien

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BTW the surge suppression for my UPS is 890 Joules:

 

 

Now view numbers I correctly provided.  Those numbers apply to a protector rated at 890 joules.  

 

Even 890 joules is near zero when destructive surges can be tens or hundreds of thousands of joules.

 

Was the PC doing something stressful (ie playing a movie)?

 

I was in Linux running Virtualbox and playing music with Clementine music player.


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#13
westom

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I was in Linux running Virtualbox and playing music with Clementine music player.

 

 

When the system crashed?  Or when the test did not crash?


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#14
SuperSapien

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I was in Linux running Virtualbox and playing music with Clementine music player.

When the system crashed?  Or when the test did not crash?
When the system crashed during the storm.
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#15
westom

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I was in Linux running Virtualbox and playing music with Clementine music player.

When the system crashed?  Or when the test did not crash?
When the system crashed during the storm.

 

Duplicate that when the UPS is unplugged.  Test should duplicate or exceed a load that existed back then.  Also useful is to discover how long the UPS can provide power from its battery.  That should be something like ten minutes.


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