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Task Manager in Win 10

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#1
aburr

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Just a question about task manager in Win 10 on a 64 bit desk top.

In The performance tag there is a quantity called "Up time"  Presumably the time the operating system is working.

Can it be reset? if so, how?


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#2
Ztruker

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Up time is how long it's  been since your computer was booted. The only way to reset it is to reboot.


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#3
britechguy

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Ztrucker,

 

         I was going to post the same response that you did, but when I did a "Before & After" reboot test yesterday I found that Windows 10 does not handle uptime in the same way as prior versions of Windows did.  It is a total uptime figure and is non-volatile.  Just before posting this I did another "Before & After" and the pertinent part of the screen shots from same are in the image below.

 

         I have no idea if/whether that value can be reset or not at this point.

 

Before&After.jpg

 

 


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#4
Ztruker

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I just did a restart and mine went from over 9 hours to 0 so a restart did reset it for me. I can't see how it could work any other way.


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#5
britechguy

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Ztrucker,

 

          Clearly it does work some other way, though I don't know how one transitions between the two.  There is clearly the ability to access some form of non-volatile memory for total uptime (or, perhaps, the amount of uptime is written to disc on shutdown and read back in on startup).  I literally just shut down my machine about 20 minutes ago and took this screen shot just a few minutes ago.  The day count is now 6 with a reasonable number of additional hours since I had the computer sleeping for quite a while yesterday.

 

Untitled.jpg

 

 


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#6
Ztruker

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I didn't shutdown, I restarted.

 

I'll take screen shots as you did and post.


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#7
britechguy

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Ztrucker,

 

           I think I've now found "the difference":  It's whether or not you have Fast Start enabled (which it is by default) or not.  Fast Start is a hybrid shutdown that has aspects of a full shutdown and aspects of hibernation.  Apparently one of the things it writes out as part of its hibernation file is the uptime, and reads it back in and starts from there when you power up the machine again.  I intentionally disabled it because I don't want a shut down to be anything other than a full shut down.  I use hibernate when I want to, but when I shut the machine down I want nothing pulled back in from the last session state, but want everything to be loaded from scratch.

 

           Now that Fast Start is disabled my uptime is resetting to zero when the machine is shut down.

 

          I've not found an easy way to get to the settings in question through the new Settings, but instead used good old Control Panel->Power Options->System Settings and then clicked on the link near the top to "Change settings that are currently unavailable."  When you come into this dialog the Shutdown Settings at the bottom are stippled out unless you click that link.  Then I disabled Fast Start and enabled the showing of Hibernate on my Power Menu.

 

Addendum:  I just figured out how to make your way there through the Power Settings dialog.  Bring it up -> Click "Additional Power Settings" link at the bottom, which brings up the old Power Options dialog from Control Panel.  You can then click on either the what to do when you press the power button or what to do when you close the lid link at the upper left to get the Power Options System Settings sub-dialog to open and follow the procedure I already mentioned abovel


Edited by britechguy, 11 October 2015 - 12:47 PM.

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#8
Ztruker

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Ah, good find. I had to disable Fast Startup or my Lenovo K450 would not completely power off. The light for the Power switch would not go out until I did this.
 
I just followed Brink's tutorial:  How to Turn On or Off Fast Startup in Windows 10
 


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#9
aburr

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Thanks for the info. my computer downloaded an update and now uptime rests


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