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New (empty) 64GB flash drive has 57.6GB free - 6.4GB has what?


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#1
Plutox

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Well that's my question - what is taking up that 6.4 GB space?

 

(This is also on Bleeping Computers.)


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#2
Rikai

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This is the difference between the prefix Giga and Gibi. The advertised size of "64GB" is not 65536MB (64 x 1024MB in a GB), as you are led to believe. Instead, it is 64,000, bringing it to about 62.5. The missing size could be due to the way the drive is formatted, or possibly an improper formatting at the factory.


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#3
Plutox

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Thanks for your response,

 

The Giga/Gibi difference is new to me. I went to properties and there it had 'Used space 10KB whatever that is. I have been informed that some restore/backup software functions can be on a drive.

 

The manufacture's/seller's website has this link which gives some 'explanations':-

http://www.verbatim-...capacity/?con=2


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#4
Rikai

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The reason is that Windows reports a size based on the power of 2, which is binary. The manufacturer reports the size based on the power ten, which is the SI scale.


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#5
Hoxtro9988712

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To put it simply decimal and binary translates to the same amount of storage capacity. Lets say you wanted to measure the distance from A to B. The distance is 1 kilometer or .621 miles. It is the same distance, but it's reported different due to measurement.

 

Capacity Calculation Formula

Decimal capacity / 1,048,576 = Binary MB capacity 
Decimal capacity / 1,073,741,824 = Binary GB capacity
Decimal capacity / 1,099,511,627,776 = Decimal TB capacity

 

​Your flash drive is 64GB so something is taking that space up. People like us think in 10's while computers think in 2 which is binary.

 

​I have an article for you here to look at. It might give you an understanding of why there is less space than advertised: http://lifehacker.co...amount-of-space


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#6
Plutox

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Thank for all your responses.

 

The link is good and  informative and have cleared up the my query very well. Job done!


Edited by Plutox, 04 December 2015 - 08:42 AM.

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#7
Hoxtro9988712

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Glad I could help :D


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