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Is it bad to have a PSU that supplies too much power? (Resolved)


Best Answer EmishOrc , 30 January 2016 - 06:08 PM

Other way round (Less Power than Needed) can hurt your components if it's supplying not enough power.  Go to the full post »


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#1
76broadband

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Can a PSU that supplies too much power (I mean more power than needed) harm the components of the motherboard?
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#2
EmishOrc

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✓  Best Answer

Other way round (Less Power than Needed) can hurt your components if it's supplying not enough power. 


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#3
76broadband

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Other way round (Less Power than Needed) can hurt your components if it's supplying not enough power. 

Understood; thank you for the early reply!


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#4
phillpower2

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Can a PSU that supplies too much power (I mean more power than needed) harm the components of the motherboard?

 

EmishOrc is quite correct but perhaps a little more info would help yourself and others that may read your thread to understand PSU output better.

 

The MB and other hardware will only draw from a PSU the power that is required, you may have a 1000W PSU but a system that only requires 500W will not draw any more than that.

 

A malfunctioning PSU can suddenly spike and put out excessive power and fry one or more components, one reason why efficiency ratings are so important.

 

Not all PSUs can actually produce the claimed power rating, this is more common on cheap, lesser and unknown brands.

 

Claimed wattage is no good if it is not consistent, the bare minimum that I would ever suggest is a Bronze efficiency rated PSU and only from a reputable brand such as Antec, Corsair, EVGA or Seasonic, there are other reputable brands out there but they tend to be rather expensive but offer no more than the aforementioned.

 

Add on video cards when used determine the wattage of the PSU that is required, in this instance you must not only make sure that you have the correct wattage output but also the right amount of amps on the +12V rail. 


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#5
76broadband

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Can a PSU that supplies too much power (I mean more power than needed) harm the components of the motherboard?

 

EmishOrc is quite correct but perhaps a little more info would help yourself and others that may read your thread to understand PSU output better.

 

The MB and other hardware will only draw from a PSU the power that is required, you may have a 1000W PSU but a system that only requires 500W will not draw any more than that.

 

A malfunctioning PSU can suddenly spike and put out excessive power and fry one or more components, one reason why efficiency ratings are so important.

 

Not all PSUs can actually produce the claimed power rating, this is more common on cheap, lesser and unknown brands.

 

Claimed wattage is no good if it is not consistent, the bare minimum that I would ever suggest is a Bronze efficiency rated PSU and only from a reputable brand such as Antec, Corsair, EVGA or Seasonic, there are other reputable brands out there but they tend to be rather expensive but offer no more than the aforementioned.

 

Add on video cards when used determine the wattage of the PSU that is required, in this instance you must not only make sure that you have the correct wattage output but also the right amount of amps on the +12V rail. 

 

Understood; thank you for the additional information


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#6
phillpower2

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You are most welcome 76broadband  :)


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#7
EmishOrc

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It would give you a clear idea, but phill has added the additional parts to my answer.


Edited by EmishOrc, 31 January 2016 - 04:49 PM.

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