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Starting Problem With Dell E153FP Monitor (Resolved)


Best Answer phillpower2 , 01 February 2016 - 08:05 AM

Hello 76broadband, A flaky on/off button or power button board are my first thoughts, the on/off button you can inspect and perhaps spray with an electrical circuit cleaning type aerosol but u... Go to the full post »


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#1
76broadband

76broadband

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I have a Dell E173FPc monitor (manufactured in 2004), and recently a persistent problem has started.

 

When I plug in the monitor to an electric outlet, it starts restarting itself. I see the green and orange lights alter between each other, then the monitor shuts off for a few seconds and starts over with this problem (while it is off because of the problem, there is no light indicating sleep/wake).

 

I have tried exchanging the power cable with a new one, and this actually fixed the problem, for a while. After a few hours, the same problem started happening again.

 

Is there any solution to this? Perhaps changing the capacitors will solve this problem?

 

Thanks in advance for any help.


Edited by 76broadband, 31 January 2016 - 08:16 PM.

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#2
phillpower2

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✓  Best Answer

Hello 76broadband,

 

A flaky on/off button or power button board are my first thoughts, the on/off button you can inspect and perhaps spray with an electrical circuit cleaning type aerosol but unless you are a qualified electrician or TV repair specialist I would not recommend you open up the monitor yourself, they can hold enough residual charge to do you serious harm and worse case scenario even cause death, not being dramatic here either.

 

The alternative is to have a suitably qualified person inspect the monitor but you would most likely find that you could purchase a new screen for what this would cost.

 

Have you tried the Dell diagnostics, see below;

 

Monitor Specific Troubleshooting
 
Self-Test Feature Check (STFC)
 
Your monitor provides a self-test feature that allows you to check if your monitor is functioning properly. If your monitor and computer are properly connected but the monitor screen remains dark, run the monitor self-test by performing the following steps: 
 
Turn off both your computer and the monitor. 
Unplug the video cable from the back of the computer. To ensure proper Self-Test operation, remove Analog (blue connector) cable from the back of computer. 
Turn on the monitor. 
The floating 'Dell - self-test Feature Check' dialog box should appear on-screen (against a black background) if the monitor cannot sense a video signal and is working correctly. While in self-test mode, the power LED remains green and the self-test pattern will scroll through the screen continually. 
 
This box also appears during normal system operation if the video cable becomes disconnected or damaged. 
Turn off your monitor and reconnect the video cable; then turn on both your computer and the monitor.
If your monitor screen remains blank after you use the previous procedure, check your video controller and computer system; your monitor is functioning properly. 

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#3
76broadband

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Hello 76broadband,

 

A flaky on/off button or power button board are my first thoughts, the on/off button you can inspect and perhaps spray with an electrical circuit cleaning type aerosol but unless you are a qualified electrician or TV repair specialist I would not recommend you open up the monitor yourself, they can hold enough residual charge to do you serious harm and worse case scenario even cause death, not being dramatic here either.

 

The alternative is to have a suitably qualified person inspect the monitor but you would most likely find that you could purchase a new screen for what this would cost.

 

Have you tried the Dell diagnostics, see below;

 

Monitor Specific Troubleshooting
 
Self-Test Feature Check (STFC)
 
Your monitor provides a self-test feature that allows you to check if your monitor is functioning properly. If your monitor and computer are properly connected but the monitor screen remains dark, run the monitor self-test by performing the following steps: 
 
Turn off both your computer and the monitor. 
Unplug the video cable from the back of the computer. To ensure proper Self-Test operation, remove Analog (blue connector) cable from the back of computer. 
Turn on the monitor. 
The floating 'Dell - self-test Feature Check' dialog box should appear on-screen (against a black background) if the monitor cannot sense a video signal and is working correctly. While in self-test mode, the power LED remains green and the self-test pattern will scroll through the screen continually. 
 
This box also appears during normal system operation if the video cable becomes disconnected or damaged. 
Turn off your monitor and reconnect the video cable; then turn on both your computer and the monitor.
If your monitor screen remains blank after you use the previous procedure, check your video controller and computer system; your monitor is functioning properly. 

 

I'm not able to let the STFC test run. When I plug in the monitor, it tries to power on but can't. The power button's light goes from orange to green in a matter of seconds, and the monitor just turns off and starts that whole process over. The screen is off the whole time this is happening.

 

I know the computer's graphics card is working, as I have connected it to a different monitor and it worked.

 

Perhaps I will get a different monitor, considering that (as you said) it would cost the same amount of money to get it repaired as if I bought a new one.

 

Thank you for your help!


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#4
phillpower2

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Perhaps I will get a different monitor, considering that (as you said) it would cost the same amount of money to get it repaired as if I bought a new one.

 

The safest and least expensive option  :thumbsup: 

A flaky on/off button or power button board are my first thoughts,

 

A better explanation than I could offer copy/paste below;

 

Dry contact may mean the following in electronics:

  • No current: A dry contact is the synonym of volt free - it is not "wetted" by a voltage source. Dry contact can refer to a secondary set of contacts of a relay circuit which does not make or break the primary current being controlled by the relay. Usually some other contacts or devices have the job of starting or stopping the primary current being controlled. For example, a reed relay matrix switch is normally switched with all contacts dry. After the contacts are all connected, a wire spring relay is energized and connects a supervisory scan point, or main switch, through which the primary current being controlled then flows. Dry contacts are primarily employed in 49 volt or less (low voltage) distribution circuits.

 

You are welcome btw  :)


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