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Current Booster

current booster circuit

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#1
ziadtalge

ziadtalge

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Hello,

 

I am working on a project and i have an output of 3.6V 100mA, I figured how to boost the output voltage to 5V and i already bought the circuit from Amazon. Any idea on how to boost the current from 100mA to 2A?  What i bought from amazon was this item: http://www.amazon.co...ailpage_o00_s00

 

I am not sure if it will be able to boost the current to my application.

 

Any Help?

 

Regards,

Ziad


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#2
Kemasa

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If you look at the specs, it can put out a max of 2A, but the input has to be able to provide the current.


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#3
ziadtalge

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Exactly, this is why I am asking if there is any solution for boosting currents.


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#4
Kemasa

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You can't boost current from nothing. The power input has to be greater than the power output. You can boost the voltage, but then the current output goes down. You can drop the voltage and increase the current, but you can't increase the voltage AND increase the current.

 

The power in can not exceed the power out (voltage * current = watts).


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#5
ziadtalge

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Don't you think a darlington pair circuit would amplify my current?


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#6
terry1966

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the way you increase current is by lowering the resistance across the circuit.

 

voltage=current x resistance,

so at the moment your circuit is 5volts=0.1amps x 50ohms

power=0.5 watts

 

to get your 2amps out you will need to decrease the resistance across the circuit to 2.5ohms.

power would = 10 watts

 

now can you do that? i have no idea, been way to long since i've messed with electronics to give you an answer on how to go about it.

 

what is your power source for this circuit? batteries?, solar panel? mains?

 

:popcorn:


Edited by terry1966, 13 February 2016 - 08:48 AM.

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#7
ziadtalge

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The power source is a solar panel, I am not sure on how to decrease the resistance of my circuit in order to have a higher power...


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#8
terry1966

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connecting things in parallel (not in series) is the route you'll need to take, be that connecting more solar panels to give you the same volts in but more current or connecting resistors across the circuit.

 

maybe connecting a single 2ohm resistor across from the + input (assume 3.5v in) to the + output (5v measured out) of the device you've bought will give you close to your desired results of 2amp out at 5 volt.

eg:- http://www.parts-exp...olerance--016-2

 

no idea on what total effect that will have on the voltage step up though or if you'll have heat issues/failures because of the added resistor.

 

like i said been way to long since i've messed with electronics to offer any reliable detailed advice to solve your problem but can't see why adding the linked resistor won't solve your problem if my memory isn't playing tricks with me, which it seems to do more often as i get older.

 

:popcorn:

 

link that will help you understand how parallel/series circuits work. :- http://www.gcsescience.com/pe20.htm


Edited by terry1966, 14 February 2016 - 12:23 PM.

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#9
Kemasa

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You can short the output, which will result in a higher current draw, but that is pointless. What you are attempting to power will take the current that is needed to run at the proper voltage. You don't need to change that. If you want to power more items, then it will work as long as you have the ability to provide enough input power.


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